Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am writing a java TCP client that talks to a C server. I have to alternate sends and receives between the two. Here is my code.

  1. The server sends the length of the binary msg(len) to client(java)
  2. Client sends an "ok" string
  3. Server sends the binary and client allocates a byte array of 'len' bytes to recieve it.
  4. It again sends back an "ok".

step 1. works. I get "len" value. However the Client gets "send blocked" and the server waits to receive data.

Can anybody take a look.

In the try block I have defined:

            Socket echoSocket = new Socket("192.168.178.20",2400);
            OutputStream os = echoSocket.getOutputStream();       
            InputStream ins = echoSocket.getInputStream();
            BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(ins));

            String fromPU = null;


            if( (fromPU = br.readLine()) !=  null){
            System.out.println("Pu returns  as="+fromPU);  

            len = Integer.parseInt(fromPU.trim());
            System.out.println("value of len from PU="+len);

            byte[] str = "Ok\n".getBytes();
            os.write(str, 0, str.length);
            os.flush();

            byte[] buffer = new byte[len];
            int bytes;
            StringBuilder curMsg = new StringBuilder();
            bytes =ins.read(buffer);
            System.out.println("bytes="+bytes); 
            curMsg.append(new String(buffer, 0, bytes));            
            System.out.println("ciphertext="+curMsg); 
                    os.write(str, 0, str.length);
            os.flush();
            }

UPDATED:

Here is my code. At the moment, there is no recv or send blocking on either sides. However, both with Buffered Reader and DataInput Stream reader, I am unable to send the ok msg. At the server end, I get a large number of bytes instead of the 2 bytes for ok.

            Socket echoSocket = new Socket("192.168.178.20",2400);
            OutputStream os = echoSocket.getOutputStream();   
            InputStream ins = echoSocket.getInputStream();
            BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(ins));
            DataInputStream dis = new DataInputStream(ins);
            DataOutputStream dos = new DataOutputStream(os);
            if( (fromPU = dis.readLine()) !=  null){
            //if( (fromPU = br.readLine()) !=  null){
            System.out.println("PU Server returns length as="+fromPU);      
            len = Integer.parseInt(fromPU.trim());
            byte[] str = "Ok".getBytes();
            System.out.println("str.length="+str.length);
            dos.writeInt(str.length);
            if (str.length > 0) {
                    dos.write(str, 0, str.length);
                 System.out.println("sent ok");
            }
            byte[] buffer = new byte[len];
            int bytes;
            StringBuilder curMsg = new StringBuilder();
            bytes =ins.read(buffer);
            System.out.println("bytes="+bytes); 
                curMsg.append(new String(buffer, 0, bytes));            
                System.out.println("binarytext="+curMsg); 

            dos.writeInt(str.length);
            if (str.length > 0) {
                    dos.write(str, 0, str.length);
                 System.out.println("sent ok");
            }
share|improve this question
    
what do you mean by 'the client gets send blocked'? Did you try to debug? –  hage Apr 29 '11 at 8:47

2 Answers 2

Using a BufferedReader around a stream and then trying to read binary data from the stream is a bad idea. I wouldn't be surprised if the server has actually sent all the data in one go, and the BufferedReader has read the binary data as well as the line that it's returned.

Are you in control of the protocol? If so, I suggest you change it to send the length of data as binary (e.g. a fixed 4 bytes) so that you don't need to work out how to switch between text and binary (which is basically a pain).

If you can't do that, you'll probably need to just read a byte at a time to start with until you see the byte representing \n, then convert what you've read into text, parse it, and then read the rest as a chunk. That's slightly inefficient (reading a byte at a time instead of reading a buffer at a time) but I'd imagine the amount of data being read at that point is pretty small.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1: An alternative might be to use DataInputStream with readLine() and readFully(). While readLine() is not ideal, it may do what the OP wants here. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 29 '11 at 8:52
    
@Peter: Possibly. It's deprecated for a reason, but it's a good thought. Personally I wish protocol designers would stop mixing text and binary in this way. (It's fine to have text encapsulated within a binary block of a known size, of course. That's different.) –  Jon Skeet Apr 29 '11 at 8:55
    
IMHO, you certainly shouldn't mix them unless you have a very clear idea of what you are doing. i.e. only after you fully understand the requirements of text and binary and documented the protocol as needed. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 29 '11 at 9:01
    
Thanks all of you. Since Buffered Reader is probably a bad idea. I have now changed the code to use DataInput Stream.However again, the server doesnt receive the "ok"(3 bytes) but seems to get 905 bytes!(like perhaps as Jon Skeet mentions above and Sarnold below?) I Shall update the post with the code. And yes, I am in control of the protocol. So perhaps I can change the length to bytes.. –  pimmling Apr 29 '11 at 13:27
    
any ideas how to proceed?? –  pimmling May 3 '11 at 8:14

Several thoughts:

        len = Integer.parseInt(fromPU.trim());

You should check the given size against a maximum that makes some sense. Your server is unlikely to send a two gigabyte message to the client. (Maybe it will, but there might be a better design. :) You don't typically want to allocate however much memory a remote client asks you to allocate. That's a recipe for easy remote denial of service attacks.

        BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(ins));
        /* ... */
        bytes =ins.read(buffer);

Maybe your BufferedReader has sucked in too much data? (Does the server wait for the Ok before continuing?) Are you sure that you're allowed to read from the underlying InputStreamReader object after attaching a BufferedReader object?

Note that TCP is free to deliver your data in ten byte chunks over the next two weeks :) -- because encapsulation, differing hardware, and so forth makes it very difficult to tell the size of packets that will eventually be used between two peers, most applications that are looking for a specific amount of data will instead populate their buffers using code somewhat like this (stolen from Advanced Programming in the Unix Environment, an excellent book; pity the code is in C and your code is in Java, but the principle is the same):

ssize_t             /* Read "n" bytes from a descriptor  */
readn(int fd, void *ptr, size_t n)
{
    size_t      nleft;
    ssize_t     nread;

    nleft = n;
    while (nleft > 0) {
        if ((nread = read(fd, ptr, nleft)) < 0) {
            if (nleft == n)
                return(-1); /* error, return -1 */
            else
                break;      /* error, return amount read so far */
        } else if (nread == 0) {
            break;          /* EOF */
        }
        nleft -= nread;
        ptr   += nread;
    }
    return(n - nleft);      /* return >= 0 */
}

The point to take away is that filling your buffer might take one, ten, or one hundred calls to read(), and your code must be resilient against slight changes in network capabilities.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks sarnold. Once I get this bug fixed, I shall restrict the byte length. –  pimmling Apr 29 '11 at 13:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.