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I am trying to determine the best time efficient algorithm to accomplish the task described below.

I have a set of records. For this set of records I have connection data which indicates how pairs of records from this set connect to one another. This basically represents an undirected graph, with the records being the vertices and the connection data the edges.

All of the records in the set have connection information (i.e. no orphan records are present; each record in the set connects to one or more other records in the set).

I want to choose any two records from the set and be able to show all simple paths between the chosen records. By "simple paths" I mean the paths which do not have repeated records in the path (i.e. finite paths only).

Note: The two chosen records will always be different (i.e. start and end vertex will never be the same; no cycles).

For example:

    If I have the following records:
        A, B, C, D, E

    and the following represents the connections: 
        (A,B),(A,C),(B,A),(B,D),(B,E),(B,F),(C,A),(C,E),
        (C,F),(D,B),(E,C),(E,F),(F,B),(F,C),(F,E)

        [where (A,B) means record A connects to record B]

If I chose B as my starting record and E as my ending record, I would want to find all simple paths through the record connections that would connect record B to record E.

   All paths connecting B to E:
      B->E
      B->F->E
      B->F->C->E
      B->A->C->E
      B->A->C->F->E

This is an example, in practice I may have sets containing hundreds of thousands of records.

share|improve this question
    
The connections are called cycles, and this answer has a lot of informations for you. –  elhoim Oct 21 '09 at 7:17
3  
Please say whether you want a finite list of loop-free connections, or infinite stream of connections with all possible loops. Cf. Blorgbeard's answer. –  Charles Stewart Dec 6 '10 at 8:47

15 Answers 15

up vote 68 down vote accepted

Robert,

It appears that this can be accomplished with a breadth-first search of the graph. The breadth-first search will find all non-cyclical paths between two nodes. This algorithm should be very fast and scale to large graphs (The graph data structure is sparse so it only uses as much memory as it needs to).

I noticed that the graph you specified above has only one edge that is directional (B,E). Was this a typo or is it really a directed graph? This solution works regardless. Sorry I was unable to do it in C, I'm a bit weak in that area. I expect that you will be able to translate this Java code without too much trouble though.

Graph.java

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.LinkedHashSet;
import java.util.LinkedList;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.Set;

public class Graph {
    private Map<String, LinkedHashSet<String>> map = new HashMap();

    public void addEdge(String node1, String node2) {
        LinkedHashSet<String> adjacent = map.get(node1);
        if(adjacent==null) {
            adjacent = new LinkedHashSet();
            map.put(node1, adjacent);
        }
        adjacent.add(node2);
    }

    public void addTwoWayVertex(String node1, String node2) {
        addEdge(node1, node2);
        addEdge(node2, node1);
    }

    public boolean isConnected(String node1, String node2) {
        Set adjacent = map.get(node1);
        if(adjacent==null) {
            return false;
        }
        return adjacent.contains(node2);
    }

    public LinkedList<String> adjacentNodes(String last) {
        LinkedHashSet<String> adjacent = map.get(last);
        if(adjacent==null) {
            return new LinkedList();
        }
        return new LinkedList<String>(adjacent);
    }
}

Search.java

import java.util.LinkedList;

public class Search {

    private static final String START = "B";
    private static final String END = "E";

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // this graph is directional
        Graph graph = new Graph();
        graph.addEdge("A", "B");
        graph.addEdge("A", "C");
        graph.addEdge("B", "A");
        graph.addEdge("B", "D");
        graph.addEdge("B", "E"); // this is the only one-way connection
        graph.addEdge("B", "F");
        graph.addEdge("C", "A");
        graph.addEdge("C", "E");
        graph.addEdge("C", "F");
        graph.addEdge("D", "B");
        graph.addEdge("E", "C");
        graph.addEdge("E", "F");
        graph.addEdge("F", "B");
        graph.addEdge("F", "C");
        graph.addEdge("F", "E");
        LinkedList<String> visited = new LinkedList();
        visited.add(START);
        new Search().breadthFirst(graph, visited);
    }

    private void breadthFirst(Graph graph, LinkedList<String> visited) {
        LinkedList<String> nodes = graph.adjacentNodes(visited.getLast());
        // examine adjacent nodes
        for (String node : nodes) {
            if (visited.contains(node)) {
                continue;
            }
            if (node.equals(END)) {
                visited.add(node);
                printPath(visited);
                visited.removeLast();
                break;
            }
        }
        // in breadth-first, recursion needs to come after visiting adjacent nodes
        for (String node : nodes) {
            if (visited.contains(node) || node.equals(END)) {
                continue;
            }
            visited.addLast(node);
            breadthFirst(graph, visited);
            visited.removeLast();
        }
    }

    private void printPath(LinkedList<String> visited) {
        for (String node : visited) {
            System.out.print(node);
            System.out.print(" ");
        }
        System.out.println();
    }
}

Program Output

B E 
B A C E 
B A C F E 
B F E 
B F C E 
share|improve this answer
4  
Please note that this is not a breadth-first traversal. With breadth first you first visit all nodes with distance 0 to the root, then those with distance 1, then 2, etc. –  mweerden Sep 12 '08 at 20:48
12  
Correct, this is a DFS. A BFS would need to use a queue, enqueuing level-(N+1) nodes to be processed after all level-N nodes. However, for the OP's purposes, either BFS or DFS will work, as no preferred sorting order of paths is specified. –  Matt J Oct 21 '08 at 17:25
1  
Casey, I've been looking for a solution to this problem for ages. I have recently implemented this DFS in C++ and it works a treat. –  AndyUK Nov 10 '08 at 11:16
3  
Disadvantage of recursion is if you will have deep graph (A->B->C->...->N) you could have StackOverflowError in java. –  Ruslan Dzhabbarov Aug 15 '12 at 20:23
    
Ported the solution to c# and worked perfectly. Had to user an implementation of LinkedHashSet in C# but worked great. –  user1415567 Sep 12 at 21:55

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) online Dictionary of Algorithms and Data Structures lists this problem as "all simple paths" and recommends a depth-first search. CLRS supplies the relevant algorithms.

A clever technique using Petri Nets is found here

share|improve this answer
1  
Could you help me with a better solution? a DFS takes forever to run: stackoverflow.com/q/8342101/632951 –  Pacerier Dec 1 '11 at 18:28

Here is the pseudocode I came up with. This is not any particular pseudocode dialect, but should be simple enough to follow.

Anyone want to pick this apart.

  • [p] is a list of vertices representing the current path.

  • [x] is a list of paths where meet the criteria

  • [s] is the source vertex

  • [d] is the destination vertex

  • [c] is the current vertex (argument to the PathFind routine)

Assume there is an efficient way to look up the adjacent vertices (line 6).

     1 PathList [p]
     2 ListOfPathLists [x]
     3 Vertex [s], [d]

     4 PathFind ( Vertex [c] )
     5     Add [c] to tail end of list [p]
     6     For each Vertex [v] adjacent to [c]
     7         If [v] is equal to [d] then
     8             Save list [p] in [x]
     9         Else If [v] is not in list [p]
    10             PathFind([v])
    11     Next For
    12     Remove tail from [p]
    13 Return
share|improve this answer
    
Can you please shed some light on step 11 and step 12 –  bozo user Feb 13 '13 at 8:37
    
Line 11 just denotes the end block that goes with the For loop that begins on line 6. Line 12 means to remove the last element of the path list before returning to the caller. –  Robert Groves Feb 13 '13 at 15:00
    
What is the initial call to PathFind - do you pass in the source vertex [s]? –  bozo user Feb 25 '13 at 1:39
    
In this example yes, but keep in mind that you may not want to write real code that maps one-to-one with this pseudocode. It's meant more to illustrate a thought process rather than well designed code. –  Robert Groves Feb 25 '13 at 6:12

I have solved a similar problem to this recently, instead of all solutions I was only interested in the shortest.

I used a 'breadth first' iterative search which used a queue of status' each of which held a record containing a current point on the graph and the path taken to get there.

you start with a single record in the queue, which has the starting node and an empty path.

Each iteration through the code takes the item off the head of the list, and checks to see if it is a solution (the node arrived at is the one you want, if it is, we are done), otherwise, it constructs a new queue item with the nodes connecting to the current node, and amended paths that are based on the path of the previous node, with the new jump attached at the end.

Now, you could use something similar, but when you find a solution, instead of stopping, add that solution to your 'found list' and continue.

You need to keep track of a visited nodes list, so that you never backtrack on yourself otherwise you have an infinite loop.

if you want a bit more pseudocode post a comment or something, and I will elaborate.

share|improve this answer
6  
I believe if you're only interested in the shortest path, then Dijkstra's Algorithm is "the solution" :). –  vicatcu Jan 12 '10 at 22:14
1  
floyd-warshall is –  Cris Stringfellow Nov 29 '11 at 9:20

Here is a logically better-looking recursive version as compared to the second floor.

public class Search {

private static final String START = "B";
private static final String END = "E";

public static void main(String[] args) {
    // this graph is directional
    Graph graph = new Graph();
    graph.addEdge("A", "B");
    graph.addEdge("A", "C");
    graph.addEdge("B", "A");
    graph.addEdge("B", "D");
    graph.addEdge("B", "E"); // this is the only one-way connection
    graph.addEdge("B", "F");
    graph.addEdge("C", "A");
    graph.addEdge("C", "E");
    graph.addEdge("C", "F");
    graph.addEdge("D", "B");
    graph.addEdge("E", "C");
    graph.addEdge("E", "F");
    graph.addEdge("F", "B");
    graph.addEdge("F", "C");
    graph.addEdge("F", "E");
    List<ArrayList<String>> paths = new ArrayList<ArrayList<String>>();
    String currentNode = START;
    List<String> visited = new ArrayList<String>();
    visited.add(START);
    new Search().findAllPaths(graph, seen, paths, currentNode);
    for(ArrayList<String> path : paths){
        for (String node : path) {
            System.out.print(node);
            System.out.print(" ");
        }
        System.out.println();
    }   
}

private void findAllPaths(Graph graph, List<String> visited, List<ArrayList<String>> paths, String currentNode) {        
    if (currentNode.equals(END)) { 
        paths.add(new ArrayList(Arrays.asList(visited.toArray())));
        return;
    }
    else {
        LinkedList<String> nodes = graph.adjacentNodes(currentNode);    
        for (String node : nodes) {
            if (visited.contains(node)) {
                continue;
            } 
            List<String> temp = new ArrayList<String>();
            temp.addAll(visited);
            temp.add(node);          
            findAllPaths(graph, temp, paths, node);
        }
    }
}
}

Program Output

B A C E 

B A C F E 

B E

B F C E

B F E 
share|improve this answer

Solution in C code. It is based on DFS which uses minimum memory.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdbool.h>

#define maxN    20  

struct  nodeLink
{

    char node1;
    char node2;

};

struct  stack
{   
    int sp;
    char    node[maxN];
};   

void    initStk(stk)
struct  stack   *stk;
{
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < maxN; i++)
        stk->node[i] = ' ';
    stk->sp = -1;   
}

void    pushIn(stk, node)
struct  stack   *stk;
char    node;
{

    stk->sp++;
    stk->node[stk->sp] = node;

}    

void    popOutAll(stk)
struct  stack   *stk;
{

    char    node;
    int i, stkN = stk->sp;

    for (i = 0; i <= stkN; i++)
    {
        node = stk->node[i];
        if (i == 0)
            printf("src node : %c", node);
        else if (i == stkN)
            printf(" => %c : dst node.\n", node);
        else
            printf(" => %c ", node);
    }

}


/* Test whether the node already exists in the stack    */
bool    InStack(stk, InterN)
struct  stack   *stk;
char    InterN;
{

    int i, stkN = stk->sp;  /* 0-based  */
    bool    rtn = false;    

    for (i = 0; i <= stkN; i++)
    {
        if (stk->node[i] == InterN)
        {
            rtn = true;
            break;
        }
    }

    return     rtn;

}

char    otherNode(targetNode, lnkNode)
char    targetNode;
struct  nodeLink    *lnkNode;
{

    return  (lnkNode->node1 == targetNode) ? lnkNode->node2 : lnkNode->node1;

}

int entries = 8;
struct  nodeLink    topo[maxN]    =       
    {
        {'b', 'a'}, 
        {'b', 'e'}, 
        {'b', 'd'}, 
        {'f', 'b'}, 
        {'a', 'c'},
        {'c', 'f'}, 
        {'c', 'e'},
        {'f', 'e'},               
    };

char    srcNode = 'b', dstN = 'e';      

int reachTime;  

void    InterNode(interN, stk)
char    interN;
struct  stack   *stk;
{

    char    otherInterN;
    int i, numInterN = 0;
    static  int entryTime   =   0;

    entryTime++;

    for (i = 0; i < entries; i++)
    {

        if (topo[i].node1 != interN  && topo[i].node2 != interN) 
        {
            continue;   
        }

        otherInterN = otherNode(interN, &topo[i]);

        numInterN++;

        if (otherInterN == stk->node[stk->sp - 1])
        {
            continue;   
        }

        /*  Loop avoidance: abandon the route   */
        if (InStack(stk, otherInterN) == true)
        {
            continue;   
        }

        pushIn(stk, otherInterN);

        if (otherInterN == dstN)
        {
            popOutAll(stk);
            reachTime++;
            stk->sp --;   /*    back trace one node  */
            continue;
        }
        else
            InterNode(otherInterN, stk);

    }

        stk->sp --;

}


int    main()

{

    struct  stack   stk;

    initStk(&stk);
    pushIn(&stk, srcNode);  

    reachTime = 0;
    InterNode(srcNode, &stk);

    printf("\nNumber of all possible and unique routes = %d\n", reachTime);

}
share|improve this answer

Have you looked at the Reingold algorithm (PDF) ?

share|improve this answer
    
That's a result of only theoretical interest; we're not here constrained to work in logspace so that is unnecessary and would be a very inefficient way to do it. –  ShreevatsaR Dec 7 '10 at 9:37

Here's a thought off the top of my head:

  1. Find one connection. (Depth-first search is probably a good algorithm for this, since the path length doesn't matter.)
  2. Disable the last segment.
  3. Try to find another connection from the last node before the previously disabled connection.
  4. Goto 2 until there are no more connections.
share|improve this answer

I found a way to enumerate all the paths including the infinite ones containing loops.

http://blog.vjeux.com/2009/project/project-shortest-path.html

Finding Atomic Paths & Cycles

Definition

What we want to do is find all the possible paths going from point A to point B. Since there are cycles involved, you can't just go through and enumerate them all. Instead, you will have to find atomic path that doesn't loop and the smallest possible cycles (you don't want your cycle to repeat itself).

The first definition I took of an atomic path is a path that does not go through the same node twice. However, I found out that is was not taking all possibilities. After some reflexion, I figured out that nodes aren't important, however edges are! So an atomic path is a path that does not go through the same edge twice.

This definition is handy, it also works for cycles: an atomic cycle of point A is an atomic path that goes from point A and ends to point A.

Implementation

Atomic Paths A -> B

In order to get all the path starting from point A, we are going to traverse the graph recursively from the point A. While going through a child, we are going to make a link child -> parent in order to know all the edges we have already crossed. Before we go to that child, we must traverse that linked list and make sure the specified edge has not been already walked through.

When we arrive to the destination point, we can store the path we found.

Freeing the list

A problem occurs when you want to free the linked list. It is basically a tree chained in the reverse order. A solution would be to double-link that list and when all the atomic paths been found, free the tree from the starting point.

But a clever solution is to use a reference counting (inspired from Garbage Collection). Each time you add a link to a parent you adds one to its reference count. Then, when you arrive at the end of a path, you go backward and free while the reference count equals to 1. If it is higher, you just remove one and stop.

Atomic Cycle A

Looking for the atomic cycle of A is the same as looking for the atomic path from A to A. However there are several optimizations we can do. First, when we arrive at the destination point, we want to save the path only if the sum of the edges cost is negative: we only want to go through absorbing cycles.

As you have seen previously, the whole graph is being traversed when looking for an atomic path. Instead, we can limit the search area to the strongly connected component containing A. Finding these components requires a simple traverse of the graph with Tarjan's algorithm.

Combining Atomic Paths and Cycles

At this point, we have all the atomic paths that goes from A to B and all the atomic cycles of each node, left to us to organize everything to get the shortest path. From now on we are going to study how to find the best combination of atomic cycles in an atomic path.

share|improve this answer

I think you should describe your real problem behind this. I say this because you ask for something time efficient, yet the answer set to the problem seems to grow exponentially!

Therefore I wouldn't expect a better algorithm than something exponential.

I'd do backtracking and going through the whole graph. In order to avoid cycles, save all visited nodes along the way. When you go back, unmark the node.

Using recursion:

static bool[] visited;//all false
Stack<int> currentway; initialize empty

function findnodes(int nextnode)
{
if (nextnode==destnode)
{
  print currentway 
  return;
}
visited[nextnode]=true;
Push nextnode to the end of currentway.
for each node n accesible from nextnode:
  findnodes(n);
visited[nextnode]=false; 
pop from currenteay
}

Or is that wrong?

edit: Oh, and I forgot: You should eliminate the recursive calls by utilizing that node stack

share|improve this answer
    
My real problem is exactly as I described, only with much larger sets. I agree this seems to grow exponentially with the size of the set. –  Robert Groves Dec 7 '10 at 3:56

Here is The C Code That i tried with minimum time complexity. This is just implementation of the proper algorithm. Hope you would like that.

/* Checking Connection Between Two Edges */

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#define MAX 100

/*
  Data structure used

vertex[] - used to Store The vertices
size - No. of vertices
sz[] - size of child's
*/

/*Function Declaration */
void initalize(int *vertex, int *sz, int size);
int root(int *vertex, int i);
void add(int *vertex, int *sz, int p, int q);
int connected(int *vertex, int p, int q);

int main() //Main Function
{ 
char filename[50], ch, ch1[MAX];
int temp = 0, *vertex, first = 0, node1, node2, size = 0, *sz;
FILE *fp;


printf("Enter the filename - "); //Accept File Name
scanf("%s", filename);
fp = fopen(filename, "r");
if (fp == NULL)
{
    printf("File does not exist");
    exit(1);
}
while (1)
{
    if (first == 0) //getting no. of vertices
    {
        ch = getc(fp);
        if (temp == 0)
        {
            fseek(fp, -1, 1);
            fscanf(fp, "%s", &ch1);
            fseek(fp, 1, 1);
            temp = 1;
        }
        if (isdigit(ch))
        {
            size = atoi(ch1);
            vertex = (int*) malloc(size * sizeof(int));     //dynamically allocate size  
            sz = (int*) malloc(size * sizeof(int));
            initalize(vertex, sz, size);        //initialization of vertex[] and sz[]
        }
        if (ch == '\n')
        {
            first = 1;
            temp = 0;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        ch = fgetc(fp);
        if (isdigit(ch))
            temp = temp * 10 + (ch - 48);   //calculating value from ch
        else
        {
            /* Validating the file  */

            if (ch != ',' && ch != '\n' && ch != EOF)
            {
                printf("\n\nUnkwown Character Detected.. Exiting..!");

                exit(1);
            }
            if (ch == ',')
                node1 = temp;
            else
            {
                node2 = temp;
                printf("\n\n%d\t%d", node1, node2);
                if (node1 > node2)
                {
                    temp = node1;
                    node1 = node2;
                    node2 = temp;
                }

                /* Adding the input nodes */

                if (!connected(vertex, node1, node2))
                    add(vertex, sz, node1, node2);
            }
            temp = 0;
        }

        if (ch == EOF)
        {
            fclose(fp);
            break;
        }
    }
}

do
{
    printf("\n\n==== check if connected ===");
    printf("\nEnter First Vertex:");
    scanf("%d", &node1);
    printf("\nEnter Second Vertex:");
    scanf("%d", &node2);

    /* Validating The Input */

    if( node1 > size || node2 > size )
    {
        printf("\n\n Invalid Node Value..");
        break;
    }

    /* Checking the connectivity of nodes */

    if (connected(vertex, node1, node2))
        printf("Vertex %d and %d are Connected..!", node1, node2);
    else
        printf("Vertex %d and %d are Not Connected..!", node1, node2);


    printf("\n 0/1:  ");

    scanf("%d", &temp);

} while (temp != 0);

free((void*) vertex);
free((void*) sz);


return 0;
}

void initalize(int *vertex, int *sz, int size) //Initialization of graph
{
int i;
for (i = 0; i < size; i++)
{
    vertex[i] = i;
    sz[i] = 0;
}
}
int root(int *vertex, int i)    //obtaining the root
{
while (i != vertex[i])
{
    vertex[i] = vertex[vertex[i]];
    i = vertex[i];
}
return i;
}

/* Time Complexity for Add --> logn */
void add(int *vertex, int *sz, int p, int q) //Adding of node
{
int i, j;
i = root(vertex, p);
j = root(vertex, q);

/* Adding small subtree in large subtree  */

if (sz[i] < sz[j])
{
    vertex[i] = j;
    sz[j] += sz[i];
}
else
{
    vertex[j] = i;
    sz[i] += sz[j];
}

}

/* Time Complexity for Search -->lg* n */

int connected(int *vertex, int p, int q) //Checking of  connectivity of nodes
{
/* Checking if root is same  */

if (root(vertex, p) == root(vertex, q))
    return 1;

return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

As far as I can tell the solutions given by Ryan Fox (58343, Christian (58444), and yourself (58461) are about as good as it get. I do not believe that breadth-first traversal helps in this case, as you will not get all paths. For example, with edges (A,B), (A,C), (B,C), (B,D) and (C,D) you will get paths ABD and ACD, but not ABCD.

share|improve this answer
    
mweerden, The breadth-first traversal that I submitted will find ALL paths while avoiding any cycles. For the graph that you have specified, the implementation correctly finds all three paths. –  Casey Watson Sep 12 '08 at 14:33
    
I didn't completely read your code and assumed you used a breadth-first traversal (because you said so). However, on closer inspection after your comment, I noticed that it is in fact not. It is actually a memoryless depth-first traversal like those of Ryan, Christian and Robert. –  mweerden Sep 12 '08 at 15:01

As ably described by some of the other posters, the problem in a nutshell is that of using a depth-first search algorithm to recursively search the graph for all combinations of paths between the communicating end nodes.

The algorithm itself commences with the start node you give it, examines all its outgoing links and progresses by expanding the first child node of the search tree that appears, searching progressively deeper and deeper until a target node is found, or until it encounters a node that has no children.

The search then backtracks, returning to the most recent node it hasn’t yet finished exploring.

I blogged about this very topic quite recently, posting an example C++ implementation in the process.

share|improve this answer

Thanks Casey Watson(poster of accepted answer) for the Solution to the problem. It worked like a charm. I started this new comment thread as i was not able to comment right below your post.

For guys scratching head for C++ solution for the Casey Watson's Java solution:

http://codepad.org/YpREeCKB

share|improve this answer

This may be late, but here's the same C# version of DFS algorithm in Java from Casey to traverse for all paths between two nodes using a stack. Readability is better with recursive as always.

    void DepthFirstIterative(T start, T endNode)
    {
        var visited = new LinkedList<T>();
        var stack = new Stack<T>();

        stack.Push(start);

        while (stack.Count != 0)
        {
            var current = stack.Pop();

            if (visited.Contains(current))
                continue;

            visited.AddLast(current);

            var neighbours = AdjacentNodes(current);

            foreach (var neighbour in neighbours)
            {
                if (visited.Contains(neighbour))
                    continue;

                if (neighbour.Equals(endNode))
                {
                    visited.AddLast(neighbour);
                    printPath(visited));
                    visited.RemoveLast();
                    break;
                }
            }

            bool isPushed = false;
            foreach (var neighbour in neighbours.Reverse())
            {
                if (neighbour.Equals(endNode) || visited.Contains(neighbour) || stack.Contains(neighbour))
                {
                    continue;
                }

                isPushed = true;
                stack.Push(neighbour);
            }

            if (!isPushed)
                visited.RemoveLast();
        }
    }
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