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What is the best solution to show that the application is doing something?

I tried showing a progress indicator, but it did not work.

UPDATE: -------------

A progress bar works fine, but isn't what I want.

I want to show a throbber, like what Web browsers use, so as long as something is being updated it keeps turning.

Cursor can also be in crHourGlass mode.

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2  
"did not work" is imprecise. How did it not work? Your two answers have made the same assumption as to why it did not work, but we may be wrong! –  David Heffernan Apr 29 '11 at 10:55
    
The word you were looking for was throbber, so I added that to your question. You still need to tell us whether that's what you were talking about when you say your "progress indicator" didn't work, and then you need to say what happened, and what you expected to happen instead. –  Rob Kennedy Apr 29 '11 at 12:34
    
Yes. I generate the image, but can see it moving... –  DRokie Apr 29 '11 at 12:43

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Try this:

AnimateUnit

unit AnimateUnit;

interface

uses
  Windows, Classes;

type
  TFrameProc = procedure(const theFrame: ShortInt) of object;

  TFrameThread = class(TThread)
  private
    { Private declarations }
    FFrameProc: TFrameProc;
    FFrameValue: ShortInt;
    procedure SynchedFrame();
  protected
    { Protected declarations }
    procedure Frame(const theFrame: ShortInt); virtual;
  public
    { Public declarations }
    constructor Create(theFrameProc: TFrameProc; CreateSuspended: Boolean = False); reintroduce; virtual;
  end;

  TAnimateThread = class(TFrameThread)
  private
    { Private declarations }
  protected
    { Protected declarations }
    procedure Execute(); override;
  public
    { Public declarations }
  end;

var
  AnimateThread: TAnimateThread;

implementation

{ TFrameThread }
constructor TFrameThread.Create(theFrameProc: TFrameProc; CreateSuspended: Boolean = False);
begin
  inherited Create(CreateSuspended);
  FreeOnTerminate := True;
  FFrameProc := theFrameProc;
end;

procedure TFrameThread.SynchedFrame();
begin
  if Assigned(FFrameProc) then FFrameProc(FFrameValue);
end;

procedure TFrameThread.Frame(const theFrame: ShortInt);
begin
  FFrameValue := theFrame;
  try
    Sleep(0);
  finally
    Synchronize(SynchedFrame);
  end;
end;

{ TAnimateThread }
procedure TAnimateThread.Execute();
var
  I: ShortInt;
begin
  while (not Self.Terminated) do
  begin
    Frame(0);
    for I := 1 to 8 do
    begin
      if (not Self.Terminated) then
      begin
        Sleep(120);
        Frame(I);
      end;
    end;
    Frame(0);
  end;
end;

end.

Unit1

unit Unit1;

interface

uses
  Windows, Messages, SysUtils, Variants, Classes, Graphics, Controls, Forms,
  Dialogs, StdCtrls, ExtCtrls, ImgList;

type
  TForm1 = class(TForm)
    ImageList1: TImageList;
    Image1: TImage;
    Button1: TButton;
    Button2: TButton;
    procedure Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
    procedure Button2Click(Sender: TObject);
  private
    { Private declarations }
  public
    { Public declarations }
    procedure UpdateFrame(const theFrame: ShortInt);
  end;

var
  Form1: TForm1;

implementation

uses
  AnimateUnit;

{$R *.DFM}
procedure TForm1.UpdateFrame(const theFrame: ShortInt);
begin
  Image1.Picture.Bitmap.Handle := 0;
  try
    ImageList1.GetBitmap(theFrame, Image1.Picture.Bitmap);
  finally
    Image1.Update();
  end;
end;

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
begin
  AnimateThread := TAnimateThread.Create(UpdateFrame);
end;

procedure TForm1.Button2Click(Sender: TObject);
begin
  AnimateThread.Terminate();
end;

end.

The Images

image1 image2 image3 image4 image5 image6 image7 image8

animate1

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It's interesting ... just can get the images correctly, can you send those to me ? thanks. –  DRokie Apr 29 '11 at 20:56
    
You can download here: eyeclaxton.com/download/images.zip –  eyeClaxton Apr 30 '11 at 0:02

You are probably running your time consuming task in the main thread.

One option is to move it to a background thread which will allow your message queue to be serviced. You need it to be serviced in order for your progress bar, and indeed any UI, to work.

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Answer to the updated question:

  • generate an animated gif e.g. here
  • add a GIF library to your environment (JEDI JVCL+JCL)
  • insert a TImage and load the generated gif
  • make it visible if you need it
share|improve this answer
    
An animated GIF will keep 'throbbing' even if another thread is frozen. The OP asks for a throbber that he has to ping to update. –  Gregor Brandt Apr 29 '11 at 15:09
    
+1 for the animated gif site. –  Brian Frost Apr 29 '11 at 21:32

A indicator is OK. You have to call Application.ProcessMessages after changing it.

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7  
Please don't. Use 'ProgressBar.Update' instead. 'Application.ProcessMessages' has lots of potential issues you have to deal with; just calling the control's 'Update' does what you're looking to do, is faster, and has none of the issues. –  Ken White Apr 29 '11 at 11:03
2  
@Ken True, but the rest of the UI will be dead also. It won't repaint properly when regions get invalidated. The cancel button (if it exists) won't work. And so on. If you are going to run long running tasks in the main thread (and ideally you wouldn't) then the only way to make it work is ProcessMessages, with all the consequences. –  David Heffernan Apr 29 '11 at 11:17
    
@Ken: I aggree with David. I know the differences and drawbacks but IMHO as a simple solution for a Rookie it is the best way to go. –  Matthias Alleweldt Apr 29 '11 at 11:25
    
Then use this instead: procedure KeepWindowsAlive; var M: TMsg; begin if PeekMessage(M, 0, 0, 0, pm_Remove) then begin TranslateMessage(M); DispatchMessage(M); end; end; It doesn't have the side effects, and returns much more quickly than PM. I have several large, processing-intense apps that display progress and correctly deal with user responses, don't use separate threads, and don't call PM once. –  Ken White Apr 29 '11 at 11:31
    
@Ken That has all the side effects and few of the benefits! –  David Heffernan Apr 29 '11 at 11:36

"What is the best solution to show that that application is doing something?" - set mouse cursor to crHourGlass? or to create another form/frame/etc which attentions the user that the application is 'doing' something, and he needs to wait.

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From your lengthy task, you can occasionally update a visual indicator, like a progress bar or anything else. However, you need to redraw the changes immediately by calling Update on the control that provides the feedback.

Don't use Application.ProcessMessages as this will introduce possible reentrancy issues.

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