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I admit I had difficulties coming up with a reasonable description for this. I cannot think of a good term that would describe precisely what I'm looking for. Perhaps this could be called a slicing iterator.

Let's say I have something like this:

struct S
{
    int i;
    char *s;
    float f;
};

std::vector<S> v(10);

What I'm looking for is a way to construct an iterator, that would point to a member of S. I'd like to be able to pass it to something like std::min_element without creating a predicate in each case. Something that might look like this:

std::min_element(slicing_iterator(v.begin(), S::f), slicing_iterator(v.end(), S::f));

Is there any template trick that I could use to achieve this? Or perhaps it's already done somewhere in Boost or some other library?

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Isn't pointer-to-member what you want? –  nbt Apr 29 '11 at 10:52
    
What would be the desired result of calling this min_element? Is it going to be an iterator that dereferences to the minimal float, or the iterator that dereferences to the S that contains the minimal S::f? –  Cubbi Apr 29 '11 at 11:03
    
It would be another slicing_iterator pointing to the element with the smallest f. It cannot be anything else, since the only way to iterate the sequence is to ++ the given iterators. –  detunized Apr 29 '11 at 11:05
    
@detunized: What Cubbi probably meant, is that if slicing_iterator dereferences directly to the S instance, min_element won't work as you intend, since it will try to compare all those S's in your vector. If it dereferences to S::f, on the other hand, you won't be able to get to the S using the standard iterator interface. –  Boaz Yaniv Apr 29 '11 at 11:11
    
BTW, what compiler are you using? If your compiler supports lambdas, that would be the way to go. –  Boaz Yaniv Apr 29 '11 at 11:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

If you're looking for an iterator that converts S into its S::f, this could certainly be done using boost (what can't be?):

std::cout << *std::min_element(
               boost::make_transform_iterator(v.begin(), boost::bind(&S::f, _1)),
               boost::make_transform_iterator(v.end(), boost::bind(&S::f, _1))
              ) << '\n';

test: https://ideone.com/jgcHr

But if you're looking for the S whose S::f is the smallest in the vector, the predicate is the most reasonable approach.

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This looks good. –  detunized Apr 29 '11 at 11:09

If you don't want to create a predicate function for each case, I would suggest not to look for a slicing operator, but to implement your predicate as a lambda function (either using Boost or C++0x). Here you will find a detailed explanation

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cpp/Sort.aspx

(this is about std::sort, but the comparison in std::min_element works equally.)

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Will something like this do the job?

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

struct S
{
    int i;
    float f;

    S() : i(0), f(0.0f) {}
    S(int i_, float f_) : i(i_), f(f_) {}
};

template <typename Iterator, typename T, typename M>
class SlicingIterator : public std::iterator<typename Iterator::iterator_category,M>
{
private:
    Iterator m_it;
    M T::*m_m;
public:
    SlicingIterator(const Iterator& it, M T::*m)
    :   m_it(it), m_m(m)
    {}

    const M operator*() const
    {
        return (*m_it).*m_m;
    }

    bool operator!=(const SlicingIterator& rhs) const
    {
        return m_it != rhs.m_it;
    }

    SlicingIterator& operator++()
    {
        ++m_it;
        return *this;
    }

    bool operator<(const SlicingIterator& rhs) const
    {
        return m_it < rhs.m_it;
    }
};

template <typename Iterator, typename T, typename M>
SlicingIterator<Iterator,T,M> slicing_iterator(const Iterator& it, M T::*m)
{
    return SlicingIterator<Iterator,T,M>(it, m);
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<S> vec;
    vec.push_back(S(23,9));
    vec.push_back(S(17,10));
    std::copy(slicing_iterator(vec.begin(), &S::f), slicing_iterator(vec.end(), &S::f), std::ostream_iterator<float>(std::cout, " "));
    return 0;
}
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This looks very good too. And no Boost. Thanks. –  detunized Apr 29 '11 at 11:32

In addition to what is already suggested you may do it almost exactly like your code sample does.

Example:

template< class IterT, class ObjT, class MemberT >
class slicing_iterator;

template< class IterT, class ObjT, class MemberT >
inline bool operator==(
                  const slicing_iterator<IterT,ObjT,MemberT>& a,
                  const slicing_iterator<IterT,ObjT,MemberT>& b
                  );

template< class IterT, class ObjT, class MemberT >
inline bool operator!=(
                  const slicing_iterator<IterT,ObjT,MemberT>& a,
                  const slicing_iterator<IterT,ObjT,MemberT>& b
                  );

template< class IterT, class ObjT, class MemberT >
class slicing_iterator
{
    IterT m_iter;
    MemberT ObjT::* m_member;

public:
    slicing_iterator( IterT iter, MemberT ObjT::*member ) :
        m_iter(iter), m_member(member)
    {
    }

    slicing_iterator& operator++() { ++m_iter; return *this; }
    slicing_iterator& operator--() { --m_iter; return *this; }

    MemberT& operator*() { return static_cast<ObjT&>(*m_iter).*m_member; }
    const MemberT& operator*() const { return static_cast<const ObjT&>(*m_iter).*m_member; }

    MemberT* operator->() { return &m_iter->*m_member; }
    const MemberT* operator->() const { return &m_iter->*m_member; }

private:
    friend bool operator== <IterT,ObjT,MemberT>(
                      const slicing_iterator<IterT,ObjT,MemberT>& a,
                      const slicing_iterator<IterT,ObjT,MemberT>& b
                      );
    friend bool operator!= <IterT,ObjT,MemberT>(
                      const slicing_iterator<IterT,ObjT,MemberT>& a,
                      const slicing_iterator<IterT,ObjT,MemberT>& b
                      );
};

template< class IterT, class ObjT, class MemberT >
inline bool operator==(
                  const slicing_iterator<IterT,ObjT,MemberT>& a,
                  const slicing_iterator<IterT,ObjT,MemberT>& b
                  )
{
    return a.m_iter == b.m_iter  &&  a.m_member == a.m_member;
}

template< class IterT, class ObjT, class MemberT >
inline bool operator!=(
                  const slicing_iterator<IterT,ObjT,MemberT>& a,
                  const slicing_iterator<IterT,ObjT,MemberT>& b
                  )
{
    return a.m_iter != b.m_iter  ||  a.m_member != a.m_member;
}

template< class IterT, class ObjT, class MemberT >
inline slicing_iterator<IterT,ObjT,MemberT>
make_slicing_iterator( IterT iter, MemberT ObjT::*member )
{
    return slicing_iterator<IterT,ObjT,MemberT>( iter, member );
}

struct S
{
    int i;
    char *s;
    float f;
};

int main(void)
{
    std::vector<S> v(10);

    std::min_element(
             make_slicing_iterator(v.begin(), &S::f),
             make_slicing_iterator(v.end(), &S::f)
             );
    return 0;
}

At first I didn't notice - it looks similar to what @Stuart Golodetz suggested but the advantage is that operator< doesn't have to be defined for iterator type (e.g. std::list::iterator). It makes this implementation universal.

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