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public class Base1
{
    public virtual void f()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Base1.f()");
    }
}

public class Derived1 : Base1
{
    // Hides Base1.f() because 'override' was not specified
    public new virtual void f()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Derived1.f()");
    }
}

public class Derived2 : Derived1
{
    // Overrides Derived1.f()
    public override void f()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Derived2.f()");

        // Call base method
        base.f();
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
        Base1 ob1 = new Derived1();
        ob1.f();

        Base1 ob2 = new Derived2();
        ob2.f();

        Derived1 ob3 = new Derived2();
        ob3.f();

        Derived2 ob4 = new Derived2();
        ob4.f();
    }
}


// Calls Derived2.f() because Derived2 overrides Derived1().f()
        Derived1 ob3 = new Derived2();
        ob3.f();

it was expecting that the

Base1 ob2 = new Derived2();
ob2.f();
  1. The derived2 function will be called but the base class function was called , what is the reason for this.
  2. Does .net uses vtables
share|improve this question
3  
Please edit your question to format it appropriately - I'd do so myself, but I can't tell what you're really trying to do at the end. –  Jon Skeet Apr 29 '11 at 11:07
1  
@Jon Please stick to the wedding Jon which you can surely get at the campsite! –  David Heffernan Apr 29 '11 at 11:08
1  
@David: Watched the wedding a while ago. Back in the tent now. –  Jon Skeet Apr 29 '11 at 11:09
1  
@Jon It's still going on as far as I can tell. I actually travelled across the Atlantic to the US to escape it but it's on every single TV channel over here! The Americans just love a British royal wedding like you wouldn't believe. –  David Heffernan Apr 29 '11 at 11:11
1  
@David: That's something I've been seriously wondering about. I can see why the British might be interested in it, and I can see why a British American might care about it. But I simply cannot understand why a regular old American would give a hoot about the British royal wedding. I certainly don't... For a minute or two, I was almost worried it might make me a bad person, but I got over it. –  Cody Gray Apr 29 '11 at 13:52

3 Answers 3

The problem here is that you're mixing things a bit too much.

Basically, here's what you have done:

  1. You define a virtual method f in the base class
  2. You descend from that base class, and create a new virtual f method
  3. You descend from the second class, and override f, this overrides the one from the second class, not the one in the base class.

So, when you say:

Base1 b = new Derived2();
b.f();

then you're always (in this case) going to call the base implementation of f, since the overridden f in Derived2 is a different f method. The name is the same, but it is still a different method.

The reason for this is that the compiler will see that the f you're calling is the one coming from the Base1 class, and so it will call that.

Since no class overrides Base1.f, that's the one you're calling.


In response to the question in the comment, strictly speaking, the class will have two virtual methods, both named f.

One, however, is shadowed by the new one introduced in Derived1.

You can, inside the class, pick which to call:

public void MethodInDerived1()
{
    f();                            // calls Derived1.f()
    base.f();                       // calls Base1.f()
}

From the outside, however, you need to "pick" by casting.

In other words:

Derived1 d = new Derived1();
d.f();                              // calls Derived1.f()
((Base1)d).f();                     // calls Base1.f()

You can also observe the methods through reflection. If you execute the following code in LINQPad, you will see that there are two methods both named f:

void Main()
{
    typeof(Derived1).GetMethods().Dump();
}

public class Base1
{
    public virtual void f()
    {
        Debug.WriteLine("Base1.f");
    }
}

public class Derived1 : Base1
{
    public virtual new void f()
    {
        Debug.WriteLine("Derived1.f");
    }
}

public class Derived2 : Derived1
{
    public override void f()
    {
        Debug.WriteLine("Derived2.f");
        base.f();
    }
}

The output from this script, truncated (there's more info out to the right):

Output from LINQPad script

share|improve this answer
    
Derived f1 will have how many virtual functions 2 or 1 –  Raghav55 Apr 29 '11 at 11:23
    
Well, strictly speaking it will have 2, but lexically you can only refer to one of them, the new one, since they have the same name. You can, however, find them using reflection. You can also call base.f to explicitly pick the base method. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Apr 29 '11 at 11:27
    
in the vtables how this information is stored because it has 2 virtual functions –  Raghav55 Apr 29 '11 at 11:30
    
As two slots, see my updated answer. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Apr 29 '11 at 11:33

The method slot used by static analysis during compilation depends on the type of the variable (or expression), not the actual object. The variable ob2 is typed as Base1, so the Base1 method slot is used. And then the correct override is selected based on the typed (essentially vtable on that slot). So the base function is used.

To use the derived2 function, the variable (or expression) must be typed as Derived1 or a subclass.

share|improve this answer

Basically, if the compile-time type of the variable you're using to call f() is Base1, it will call the base method - because nothing's actually overriding it.

If the compile-time type is Derived1 or Derived2, it will call the appropriate method in either Derived1 or Derived2 based on the execution-time type of the object... because at that point the compiler will just be issuing a virtual call to Derived1.f(), and overriding will occur at execution time.

And yes, .NET uses vtables.

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