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Is there a way to check if the user is using a tablet or a phone? I've got problems with my tilt function and my new tablet (Transformer)

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are you developing a native app or web app?? you can check for the width i.e dimensions of the phone that way you would have a rough idea whether it is tablet or a phone?? –  abhijit Apr 29 '11 at 13:06
20  
You are asking the wrong question. It does not matter whether the device is a phone, tablet, television, toaster, teacup, or thermometer. What matters are the capabilities, not the marketing-defined class of the device. Please ask a fresh Android question describing what capabilities you are seeking and how to detect whether the device has such capabilities, or how to filter yourself out of the Market for devices that lack such capabilities. –  CommonsWare Apr 29 '11 at 14:32
5  
@CommonsWare: some times you want to add extra features for devices that have a larger screen. –  breceivemail May 28 '12 at 5:23
7  
@breceivemail: Which means you need to check whether the device has a larger screen. "Larger screen" != "tablet". –  CommonsWare May 28 '12 at 10:26
2  
A better answer can be found here: stackoverflow.com/a/9308284/1750829 Simple as that :-) –  Or Kazaz Apr 19 '13 at 16:23

23 Answers 23

As it has been mentioned before, you do not want to check whether the device is a tablet or a phone but you want to know about the features of the device,

Most of the time, the difference between a tablet and a phone is the screen size which is why you want to use different layout files. These files are stored in the res/layout-<qualifiers> directories. You can create an XML file in the directoy res/values-<same qualifiers> for each of your layouts and put an int/bool/string resource into it to distinguish between the layouts you use.

Example:

File res/values/screen.xml (assuming res/layout/ contains your layout files for handsets)

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<resources>
  <string name="screen_type">phone</string>
</resources>


File res/values-sw600dp/screen.xml (assuming res/layout-sw600dp/ contains your layout files for small tablets like the Nexus 7)

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<resources>
  <string name="screen_type">7-inch-tablet</string>
</resources>


File res/values-sw720dp/screen.xml (assuming res/layout-sw720dp/ contains your layout files for large tablets like the Nexus 10):

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<resources>
  <string name="screen_type">10-inch-tablet</string>
</resources>


Now the screen type is accessible via the R.string.screen_type constant.

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2  
+1, great answer because it provides more insight into why you actually want to check for tablet/phone. We're approaching a moment in which phones will become small tablets anyway ;) –  andr Jan 17 '13 at 0:30
1  
+1 nice answer working great –  Amit Hooda Mar 18 '13 at 9:56
    
Very good idea. Thanks in advance –  Mojiiz Mar 27 '13 at 8:33
    
should be accepted as an answer –  Zakharov Roman Jan 16 at 14:06
    
you are Einstein :) –  Ripal Tamboli Jun 7 at 10:15

To detect whether or not the device is a tablet use the following code:

public boolean isTablet(Context context) {
    boolean xlarge = ((context.getResources().getConfiguration().screenLayout & Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_MASK) == 4);
    boolean large = ((context.getResources().getConfiguration().screenLayout & Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_MASK) == Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_LARGE);
    return (xlarge || large);
}

LARGE and XLARGE Screen Sizes are determined by the manufacturer based on the distance from the eye they are to be used at (thus the idea of a tablet).

More info : http://groups.google.com/group/android-developers/browse_thread/thread/d6323d81f226f93f

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On both - Kindle Fire and Motorola Droid Bionic -- the SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_MASK == 15. So why would your solution work? –  Igor Ganapolsky Apr 7 '12 at 18:17
    
I believe, this results true on the Kindle Fire. I dont have a bionic on me today...but I will check in a few days when my friend comes back into town. However.....I've been testing Helton Isac's answer and it works beautifully. Please check that too. –  petey Apr 11 '12 at 14:40
4  
There's Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_XLARGE, so you don't have to use a constant, and you can use >= LARGE. –  SiPlus Jan 12 '13 at 15:35
1  
Galaxy Note seems to report SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_LARGE so it would be wrongly classified as tablet –  miguelSantirso May 25 '13 at 15:17
1  
Thank you sir for u awesome answer finally i have found the difference between xLarge and Large –  Coderji Jun 22 '13 at 12:47

This post helped me a lot,

Unfortunately I don't have the reputation necessary to evaluate all the answers that helped me.

I needed to identify if my device was a tablet or a phone, with that I would be able to implement the logic of the screen. And in my analysis the tablet must be more than 7 inches (Xlarge) starting at MDPI.

Here's the code below, which was created based on this post.

/**
 * Checks if the device is a tablet or a phone
 * 
 * @param activityContext
 *            The Activity Context.
 * @return Returns true if the device is a Tablet
 */
public static boolean isTabletDevice(Context activityContext) {
    // Verifies if the Generalized Size of the device is XLARGE to be
    // considered a Tablet
    boolean xlarge = ((activityContext.getResources().getConfiguration().screenLayout & 
                        Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_MASK) == 
                        Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_XLARGE);

    // If XLarge, checks if the Generalized Density is at least MDPI
    // (160dpi)
    if (xlarge) {
        DisplayMetrics metrics = new DisplayMetrics();
        Activity activity = (Activity) activityContext;
        activity.getWindowManager().getDefaultDisplay().getMetrics(metrics);

        // MDPI=160, DEFAULT=160, DENSITY_HIGH=240, DENSITY_MEDIUM=160,
        // DENSITY_TV=213, DENSITY_XHIGH=320
        if (metrics.densityDpi == DisplayMetrics.DENSITY_DEFAULT
                || metrics.densityDpi == DisplayMetrics.DENSITY_HIGH
                || metrics.densityDpi == DisplayMetrics.DENSITY_MEDIUM
                || metrics.densityDpi == DisplayMetrics.DENSITY_TV
                || metrics.densityDpi == DisplayMetrics.DENSITY_XHIGH) {

            // Yes, this is a tablet!
            return true;
        }
    }

    // No, this is not a tablet!
    return false;
}
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The best solution that i found, thank you Helton Isac! Perhaps can you add (for a better solution) a check for the inchs of the screen? anyway, a 10 for this solution –  Aracem Mar 12 '12 at 11:17
4  
I really disagree. This is a method to find a certain screen size. Again, as I have answered, there IS NO difference between a tablet and a phone. This is not an answer to the question. It is not possible to differentiate because there is no 1 difference. If you need to code for certain features (like you seem to do for certain screen sizes), then do so, but do not call it tablet vs phone. Topic starter seemed to put the line @ certain tilt functionality. Read @commonware 's comment on the question thourougly. –  Nanne Mar 12 '12 at 13:02
    
I do agree with Nanne, but as I said, in my Application I need to show two panels if the screen are large enough to do it. And I can't use layouts in this case, because the screen logic was in the Java side. –  Helton Isac Mar 13 '12 at 11:36
2  
Helton, thx for this. Thought I'd say that this returns: Kindle Fire : false, Moto Xoom (v1) : true, Galaxy Note : false, Galaxy Tab 10.1 limited : true –  petey Apr 12 '12 at 19:10
    
Aside from the argument, Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_XLARGE = 4 according to developer.android.com/reference/android/content/res/… which can be used instead for API level less than 9. –  trgraglia Sep 6 '12 at 16:46

Why not calculate the size of the screen diagonal and use that to make the decision whether the device is a phone or tablet?

private boolean isTablet()
{
    Display display = getWindowManager().getDefaultDisplay();
    DisplayMetrics displayMetrics = new DisplayMetrics();
    display.getMetrics(displayMetrics);

    int width = displayMetrics.widthPixels / displayMetrics.densityDpi;
    int height = displayMetrics.heightPixels / displayMetrics.densityDpi;

    double screenDiagonal = Math.sqrt( width * width + height * height );
    return (screenDiagonal >= 9.0 );
}

Of course one can argue whether the threshold should be 9 inches or less.

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This is not working... simply some phones report the wrong density values and the computation in inches fails - see there: stackoverflow.com/questions/2193457/… –  STeN Mar 25 '12 at 8:52

there is no difference. You should define what you think is the difference, and check for that. Is a galaxy tab a phone? or a tablet? and why?

You should define what specific features you are looking for, and code for that.

It seems you are looking for 'tilt'. I think this is the same as the accelerometer (is that a word?). You can just check if the device supports it, using:

public class Accel extends Activity implements SensorListener {
...
  SensorManager sensorMgr = (SensorManager) getSystemService(SENSOR_SERVICE);
  boolean accelSupported = sensorMgr.registerListener(this,
        SENSOR_ACCELEROMETER,
        SENSOR_DELAY_UI);
...
}

(from http://stuffthathappens.com/blog/2009/03/15/android-accelerometer/ . i have not tested it)

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I've got problems with my tilt function and my new tablet (Transformer) –  Benny Apr 29 '11 at 13:08
    
Kind of a silly answer imo - of course there is a difference. Galaxy = phone. Why? Because it's a "smartphone" according to the manufacturer for one. If you're hinting that he needs to check for size, or ability to call, or... anything - just say that. –  Dave Apr 29 '11 at 13:11
3  
I disagree, it might not work for all mobiles, while some tablets do have these sensors. That's why my initial answer about no difference. Anyway, I've added some code you should try. –  Nanne Apr 29 '11 at 13:34
2  
The problem is, that because tablets are "build" in landscape mode the x and y axis of the accelerometer are flipped when you expect your app to run in portrait mode. This can mess things up quite a bit :) So it IS vital that you check weather you are running on a tablet or not. –  androidika Jun 1 '11 at 4:59
1  
But then it is the other way around => if that is the only thing what makes a device a tablet, you should find out how the x/y axis works, not the other way around. I doubt by the way that this is true for all tablets and/or phones? –  Nanne Jun 1 '11 at 6:11

Based on Robert Dale Johnson III and Helton Isac I came up with this code Hope this is useful

public static boolean isTablet(Context context) {
    TelephonyManager manager = 
        (TelephonyManager)context.getSystemService(Context.TELEPHONY_SERVICE);
    if (manager.getPhoneType() == TelephonyManager.PHONE_TYPE_NONE) {
        //Tablet
        return true;
    } else {
        //Mobile
        return false; 
    }
}

public static boolean isTabletDevice(Context activityContext) {
    // Verifies if the Generalized Size of the device is XLARGE to be
    // considered a Tablet
    boolean xlarge = 
         ((activityContext.getResources().getConfiguration().screenLayout & 
           Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_MASK) == Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_XLARGE);

    // If XLarge, checks if the Generalized Density is at least MDPI (160dpi)
    if (xlarge) {
        DisplayMetrics metrics = new DisplayMetrics();
        Activity activity = (Activity) activityContext;
        activity.getWindowManager().getDefaultDisplay().getMetrics(metrics);

        // MDPI=160, DEFAULT=160, DENSITY_HIGH=240, DENSITY_MEDIUM=160,
        // DENSITY_TV=213, DENSITY_XHIGH=320
        if (metrics.densityDpi == DisplayMetrics.DENSITY_DEFAULT
                  || metrics.densityDpi == DisplayMetrics.DENSITY_HIGH
                  || metrics.densityDpi == DisplayMetrics.DENSITY_MEDIUM   
                  || metrics.densityDpi == DisplayMetrics.DENSITY_XHIGH) {

             // Yes, this is a tablet!
             return true;
        }
    }

    // No, this is not a tablet!
    return false;
}

So in your code make a filter like

if(isTabletDevice(Utilities.this) && isTablet(Utilities.this)){
    //Tablet
} else {
    //Phone
}
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Samsung 7" has telephony.. so this is not completely correct –  Vlad Jan 31 '13 at 16:26

My assumption is that when you define 'Mobile/Phone' you wish to know whether you can make a phone call on the device which cannot be done on something that would be defined as a 'Tablet'. The way to verify this is below. If you wish to know something based on sensors, screen size, etc then this is really a different question.

Also, while using screen resolution, or the resource managements large vs xlarge, may have been a valid approach in the past new 'Mobile' devices are now coming with such large screens and high resolutions that they are blurring this line while if you really wish to know phone call vs no phone call capability the below is 'best'.

TelephonyManager manager = (TelephonyManager)context.getSystemService(Context.TELEPHONY_SERVICE);
        if(manager.getPhoneType() == TelephonyManager.PHONE_TYPE_NONE){
            return "Tablet";
        }else{
            return "Mobile";
        }
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5  
Some tablet can phone and have a GSM or CDMA type...So your solution is not perfect too. –  arnouf Sep 11 '12 at 10:17

Use this method which returns true when the device is a tablet

public boolean isTablet(Context context) {  
        return (context.getResources().getConfiguration().screenLayout   
                & Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_MASK)    
                >= Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_LARGE; 
    }
share|improve this answer
    
This solution is e.g. not working on a Emulator with API 18 and Nexus 7 1200 x 1920 xhdpi ! –  Ingo Oct 13 at 5:27

For those who want to refer to Google's code of deciding which devices will use a Tablet UI can refer to below:

  // SystemUI (status bar) layout policy
        int shortSizeDp = shortSize
                * DisplayMetrics.DENSITY_DEFAULT
                / DisplayMetrics.DENSITY_DEVICE;

        if (shortSizeDp < 600) {
            // 0-599dp: "phone" UI with a separate status & navigation bar
            mHasSystemNavBar = false;
            mNavigationBarCanMove = true;
        } else if (shortSizeDp < 720) {
            // 600-719dp: "phone" UI with modifications for larger screens
            mHasSystemNavBar = false;
            mNavigationBarCanMove = false;
        } else {
            // 720dp: "tablet" UI with a single combined status & navigation bar
            mHasSystemNavBar = true;
            mNavigationBarCanMove = false;
        }
        }
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1  
what is the value of shortSize ? –  kc ochibili Sep 5 '13 at 5:15

Please check out below code.

private boolean isTabletDevice() {
  if (android.os.Build.VERSION.SDK_INT >= 11) { // honeycomb
    // test screen size, use reflection because isLayoutSizeAtLeast is
    // only available since 11
    Configuration con = getResources().getConfiguration();
    try {
      Method mIsLayoutSizeAtLeast = con.getClass().getMethod(
      "isLayoutSizeAtLeast", int.class);
      boolean r = (Boolean) mIsLayoutSizeAtLeast.invoke(con,
      0x00000004); // Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_XLARGE
      return r;
    } catch (Exception x) {
      x.printStackTrace();
      return false;
    }
  }
  return false;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
No longer valid with ICS. Indeed, there are tablets with Android versions below 11 –  mdelolmo Feb 14 '12 at 10:57
    
This is NOT reliable. The new ICS phones have an API level > 11. –  Jason Robinson Feb 15 '12 at 16:20

Thinking on the "new" acepted directories (values-sw600dp for example) i created this method based on the screen' width DP:

 public static final int TABLET_MIN_DP_WEIGHT = 450;
 protected static boolean isSmartphoneOrTablet(Activity act){
    DisplayMetrics metrics = new DisplayMetrics();
    act.getWindowManager().getDefaultDisplay().getMetrics(metrics);

    int dpi = 0;
    if (metrics.widthPixels < metrics.heightPixels){
        dpi = (int) (metrics.widthPixels / metrics.density);
    }
    else{
        dpi = (int) (metrics.heightPixels / metrics.density);
    }

    if (dpi < TABLET_MIN_DP_WEIGHT)         return true;
    else                                    return false;
}

And on this list you can find some of the DP of popular devices and tablet sizes:

Wdp / Hdp

GALAXY Nexus: 360 / 567
XOOM: 1280 / 752
GALAXY NOTE: 400 / 615
NEXUS 7: 961 / 528
GALAXY TAB (>7 && <10): 1280 / 752
GALAXY S3: 360 / 615

Wdp = Width dp
Hdp = Height dp

share|improve this answer

E.g. have one important difference (at least for my program) between the phone and tablet. It is the default orientation of the device. Phone has a portrait orientation, the tablet - landscape. And respectively method to determine the device:

private static boolean isLandscapeDefault(Display display) {
    Log.d(TAG, "isTablet()");
    final int width = display.getWidth();
    final int height = display.getHeight();

    switch (display.getOrientation()) {
    case 0: case 2:
        if(width > height) return true;
        break;
    case 1: case 3:
        if(width < height) return true;
        break;
    }
    return false;
}

EDITED: Following the discussions with Dan Hulme changed the name of the method.

share|improve this answer
    
Not all tablets have a default landscape orientation. And if the "default" orientation matters to your program, it's probably wrong in other ways. See this Android Developers' Blog post for an example. –  Dan Hulme Oct 28 '12 at 12:31
    
Please, can you give specific examples of tablets, which in the default orientation the width is less than the height? And of course you know better what should be my app :D. –  Silver Nov 10 '12 at 18:15
    
The Nexus 7 would be one example. But you don't have to take my word for it: read the article I linked, which explains it all. –  Dan Hulme Nov 10 '12 at 18:30
    
I think should change the name of my method. In fact, more importantly (at least for my app ;) ) default device orientation, and my method is adequate for this task. Also very correctly identified the problem @Nanne answer, see above. –  Silver Nov 11 '12 at 16:49
    
@Silver Galaxy Tab 7", Nexus 7, Chinese tabs, etc... –  Frederic Yesid Peña Sánchez Apr 11 '13 at 18:43

Well, the best solution that worked for me is quite simple:

private boolean isTabletDevice(Resources resources) {   
    int screenLayout = resources.getConfiguration().screenLayout & Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_MASK;
    boolean isScreenLarge = (screenLayout == Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_LARGE);
    boolean isScreenXlarge = (screenLayout == Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_XLARGE);
    return (isScreenLarge || isScreenXlarge);
}

Used like this:

public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    [...]
    if (this.isTabletDevice(this.getResources()) == true) {
        [...]
    }
}

I really don't want to look at the pixels sizes but only rely on the screen size.

Works well as Nexus 7 (LARGE) is detected as a tablet, but not Galaxy S3 (NORMAL).

share|improve this answer

This method is a recommend by Google. I see this code in Google Offical Android App iosched

public static boolean isTablet(Context context) {
        return (context.getResources().getConfiguration().screenLayout
                & Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_MASK)
                >= Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_LARGE;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This solution is e.g. not working on a Emulator with API 18 and Nexus 7 1200 x 1920 xhdpi ! –  Ingo Oct 13 at 5:27
    
you should test on real device :) –  hqt Oct 13 at 6:20
    
I have tested on Emulator and the result of "isTablet(Context context) was false. Try by self on Emulator. –  Ingo Oct 13 at 15:57

I think a tablet has a min and max 600 px width and height,
so need to know the screen density and the height/width in dp,
to retrieve the value :

DisplayMetrics metrics = new DisplayMetrics();
activity.getWindowManager().getDefaultDisplay().getMetrics(metrics);
Display display = ((WindowManager)getSystemService(Context.WINDOW_SERVICE)).getDefaultDisplay();
int width = display.getWidth(); 
int height = display.getHeight(); 
float density = metrics.density;  
if((width/density>=600 && height/density>=600))
 isTablette = true;
else
 isTablette = false;

share|improve this answer
    
This is not right because Samsung galaxy s3 resultion 720 x 1280. –  Nikhil Oct 11 '12 at 6:32

I know this is not directly an answer to your question, but other answers here give a good idea of how to identify screen size. You wrote in your question that you got problems with the tilting and this just happened to me as well.

If you run the gyroscope (or rotation sensor) on a smartphone the x- and y-axis can be differently defined than on a tablet, according to the default orientation of that device (e.g. Samsung GS2 is default portrait, Samsung GT-7310 is default landscape, new Google Nexus 7 is default portrait, although it is a tablet!).

Now if you want to use Gyroscope you might end up with a working solution for smartphones, but axis-confusion on some tablets or the other way round.

If you use one of the solutions from above to only go for screen-size and then apply

SensorManager.remapCoordinateSystem(inputRotationMatrix, SensorManager.AXIS_X, 
    SensorManager.AXIS_Y, outputRotationMatrix);

to flip the axis if it has a large or xlarge screen-size this might work in 90% of the cases but for example on the Nexus 7 it will cause troubles (because it has default portrait orientation and a large screen-size).

The simplest way to fix this is provided in the RotationVectorSample that ships with the API demos by setting the sceenOrientation to nosensor in your manifest:

<activity
    ...
    android:screenOrientation="nosensor">
...
</activity>
share|improve this answer

This is the method that i use :

public static boolean isTablet(Context ctx){    
    return = (ctx.getResources().getConfiguration().screenLayout & Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_MASK) >= Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_LARGE; 
}
share|improve this answer

If you want to make application in different resolution, you can create different layouts for different density.

share|improve this answer

I think this is the easiest way to be honest. This will check the screen size that's being used:

Display display = getWindowManager().getDefaultDisplay(); 
int width = display.getWidth();
int height = display.getHeight();

Best of luck!

share|improve this answer

I run both forgivegod & Volker Voecking's snippest on Motorola XOOM. The screenDiagonal on XOOM is 8.9, not the exactly result I expected. Due to so many size of android tablet, so hard to define it's tablet or phone just by the screenDiagonal.

Therefore I think forgivegod's solution could be more consistent on most android devices out there.

share|improve this answer

The smart solution is to create WebView and get User-Agent from him. Then check if he contain "Mobile".

public static boolean isTablet(Context context) {
    String user_agent = new WebView(context).getSettings().getUserAgentString();
    boolean mobile = user_agent.contains("Mobile");
    return ((context.getResources().getConfiguration().screenLayout
        & Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_MASK)
        >= Configuration.SCREENLAYOUT_SIZE_LARGE)&&(!mobile);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This solution is e.g. not working on a Emulator with API 18 and Nexus 7 1200 x 1920 xhdpi ! –  Ingo Oct 13 at 5:28
    
Ingo, than WebKit in emulator working not so well as you expected. –  Dmitry Velychko Oct 20 at 22:32

I'm recommend android library 'caffeine' That's contain get Phone or tablet, and 10inch~!

very easy use.

the library is here.

https://github.com/ShakeJ/Android-Caffeine-library

and use

DisplayUtil.isTablet(this);
DisplayUtil.isTenInch(this);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for Caffeine :-) –  Pascal Jan 23 at 10:10
1  
-1 for Caffeine. Some bad code in there :P –  Jared Rummler Jun 14 at 0:03

Following code worked for me absolutely as expected, regardless of the screensize and density of the devices.

        String userAgent = new WebView(YourActivity.this).getSettings().getUserAgentString();
    if (userAgent.contains("Mobile")) {
        // It is a Mobile
    } else {
        // It is a Tablet
    }
share|improve this answer

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