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Does anyone know what the TIMESTAMP field in v$session_longops does? The description on the documentation page just says "timestamp".

I need to get the elapsed time of some operations I monitor in longops and for short tests they are often less than 1 second, but I still want to know which ones run longer. I was hoping to use this TIMESTAMP field to capture millisecond time, but I can't find out if the TIMESTAMP field can even be used for that.

Failing that, is there any other way I could get the millisecond duration of these processes in longops?

UPDATE:

Having done some more investigation, the TIMESTAMP field appears to always have a value of NULL. Also, it's datatype is a DATE, not a TIMESTAMP...

(using Oracle 10g)

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It's called v$session_longops since its purpose is to monitor long operations :-) You could capture systimestamp before and after your operation and calculate the difference, should get you precision in 6 decimals. –  Martin Schapendonk Apr 29 '11 at 20:49
    
@Martin Schapendonk: Yeah, that's what I ended up doing. For large data sets (closer to "real"-sized ones), these operations would take long enough to register normally. It's for very small specific tests that they run too quick to be easily monitored. –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Apr 29 '11 at 21:05

4 Answers 4

Oracle maintains V$SESSION_LONGOPS - you can use DBMS_APPLICATION_INFO.SET_SESSION_LONGOPS to put entries in there and to update them, but Oracle controls how they get purged.

One wonders why you don't create your own table to store timings for all of your tests, so that you can analyze all the data at your leisure? You seem to indicate that you've got packages that contain your tests; throwing an INSERT or UPDATE statement into those packages seems pretty zero-sum compared to calls to DBMS_APPLICATION_INFO.

V$SESSION_LONGOPS predates Oracle's support of the TIMESTAMP datatype, so that's why the column is a DATE.

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I use v$session_longops because it and the supporting method (set_session_longops) were already there and did what I wanted - why add new tables and methods when what I need and want is already there? It's only now that I want millisecond timing that I can't get from v$session_longops. At this stage, there probably isn't time to add new tables and packages to maintain them. If I knew then what I know now... Still, any idea what the TIMESTAMP column is supposed to be used for? Is it for some internal Oracle use? –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Apr 29 '11 at 15:26

you can get the milliseconds like that:

SYS@PRJ_SCOTTY1-VM> select to_char(SYSTIMESTAMP, 'hh24:mi:ss:ff3') from dual;

TO_CHAR(SYSTIMESTAMP,'HH24:MI:SS:FF3')
------------------------------------------------------
16:06:10:944

SYS@PRJ_SCOTTY1-VM> select to_char(SYSTIMESTAMP, 'hh24:mi:ss:ff3') from dual;

TO_CHAR(SYSTIMESTAMP,'HH24:MI:SS:FF3')
------------------------------------------------------
16:06:12:241

SYS@PRJ_SCOTTY1-VM>

in case you need a numeric representation of the INTERVAL object you could use these functions:

  /*
  ** **************************************************************************
  */
  Function daysBetween
   (ts1 timestamp with time zone,
    ts2 timestamp with time zone,
    numDec number default 0
   )
  Return Number is
    i INTERVAL DAY(3) TO SECOND(3) := ts2 - ts1;
  Begin
    return round(
      +      extract( day    from i )
      +      extract( hour   from i )/60
      +      extract( minute from i )/60/60
      +      extract( second from i )/60/60/60
    , numDec);
  End;

  /*
  ** **************************************************************************
  */
  Function hoursBetween
   (ts1 timestamp with time zone,
    ts2 timestamp with time zone,
    numDec number default 0
   )
  Return Number is
    i INTERVAL DAY(3) TO SECOND(3) := ts2 - ts1;
  Begin
    return round(
      +      extract( day    from i )*24
      +      extract( hour   from i )
      +      extract( minute from i )/60
      +      extract( second from i )/60/60
    , numDec);
  End;

  /*
  ** **************************************************************************
  */
  Function minutesBetween
   (ts1 timestamp with time zone,
    ts2 timestamp with time zone,
    numDec number default 0
   )
  Return Number is
    i INTERVAL DAY(3) TO SECOND(3) := ts2 - ts1;
  Begin
    return round(
      +      extract( day    from i )*24*60
      +      extract( hour   from i )*60
      +      extract( minute from i )
      +      extract( second from i )/60
    , numDec);
  End;


  /*
  ** **************************************************************************
  */
  Function secondsBetween
   (ts1 timestamp with time zone,
    ts2 timestamp with time zone,
    numDec number default 0
   )
  Return Number is
    i INTERVAL DAY(3) TO SECOND(3) := ts2 - ts1;
  Begin
    return round(
      +     extract( day    from i )*24*60*60
      +     extract( hour   from i )*60*60
      +     extract( minute from i )*60
      +     extract( second from i )
    , numDec);
  End;


  /*
  ** **************************************************************************
  */
  Function msecBetween
   (ts1 timestamp with time zone,
    ts2 timestamp with time zone,
    numDec number default 0
   )
  Return Number is
    i INTERVAL DAY(3) TO SECOND(3) := ts2 - ts1;
  Begin
    return round (
      +     extract( day    from i )*24*60*60*1000
      +     extract( hour   from i )*60*60*1000
      +     extract( minute from i )*60*1000
      +     extract( second from i )*1000
    , numDec);
  End;
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I'm not sure this can be done just while querying v$session_longops - I was hoping to just augment the monitoring queries I already have. I guess I could do these calculations in the main packages I'm monitoring and then insert the data into the CONTEXT field via set_session_longops since I'm not using it for anything else... –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Apr 29 '11 at 14:58

Maybe you can use SELECT dbms_utility.get_time FROM dual; ? It returns the time in hundreds of a second and computing an elapsed time is just by a simple subtraction.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Actual solution ended up looking like this:

io_start := systimestamp;
/*do some work*/
io_end := systimestamp;
dbms_application_info.set_session_longops(rindex => io_rindex, slno => io_slno, target => 0,
                      context => extract(second from (io_end-io_start)), --for very short jobs, store the millisecond time difference in the Context field.
                      op_name => in_op_name, sofar => 1, totalwork => 1,
                      units => 'blocks', target_desc => 'block job');

Yes, I stored the millisecond duration in the context field since it seems to be available for whatever purpose the developer needs.

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