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I've the follwing 2 versions of ANSI compliant SQL(column/table names changed to protect confidential data), of which one of them satisfies my requirement by following the right logic while the other doesn't.

1)ANSI Join 1-Works

SELECT b.COLUMN_A,
  COUNT(a.COLUMN_A)
FROM TABLE1 a
RIGHT OUTER JOIN
  (SELECT COLUMN_A FROM TABLE2 WHERE COLUMN_X='TEST') b
ON  a.COLUMN_A = b.COLUMN_A
AND a.COLUMN_B in (SELECT FROM TABLE3 WHERE COLUMN_Y=5)  --WORKS
GROUP BY b.COLUMN_A

1) gives output like this:

COLUMN_A  COUNT(COLUMN_A)
--------------------------
A       0
B       0
C       1
D       1
E       0

2)ANSI Join 2-Doesn't work

SELECT b.COLUMN_A,
  COUNT(a.COLUMN_A)
FROM TABLE1 a
RIGHT OUTER JOIN
  (SELECT COLUMN_A FROM TABLE2 WHERE COLUMN_X='TEST') b
ON  a.COLUMN_A = b.COLUMN_A
WHERE
a.COLUMN_B in (SELECT FROM TABLE3 WHERE COLUMN_Y=5)      --DOESN'T WORK
GROUP BY b.COLUMN_A

3)Oracle's proprietary join-Doesn't work

SELECT b.COLUMN_A,
  COUNT(a.COLUMN_A)
FROM TABLE1 a,(SELECT COLUMN_A FROM TABLE2 WHERE COLUMN_X='TEST') b
WHERE
a.COLUMN_A(+) = b.COLUMN_A
AND a.COLUMN_B in (SELECT FROM TABLE3 WHERE COLUMN_Y=5) --DOESN'T WORK
GROUP BY b.COLUMN_A

2) & 3) gives output like this:

COLUMN_A  COUNT(COLUMN_A)
--------------------------
C       1
D       1

I understand (2,ANSI) & (3,PROPRIETARY) are equivalent. But Is there any equivalent proprietary SQL for (1,ANSI)?. Any help would be most welcome. Thanks. Edit: I've updated the question with the sample output.

share|improve this question
    
You might consider adding information to make it clear, what the desired output looks like, and what you are getting in the bad situations. – EvilTeach Apr 29 '11 at 15:00
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You probably want to change this condition:

AND a.COLUMN_B in (SELECT FROM TABLE3 WHERE COLUMN_Y=5)

to either this:

AND a.COLUMN_B (+) in (SELECT FROM TABLE3 WHERE COLUMN_Y=5)

or this:

AND (a.COLUMN_B IS NULL OR a.COLUMN_B in (SELECT FROM TABLE3 WHERE COLUMN_Y=5))

But in general, I would say do outer joins with the ANSI syntax. Even as someone who learned Oracle syntax first and is very comfortable with it, ANSI is much clearer for outer joins.

share|improve this answer
1  
Concur on using ANSI join syntax. Using Oracle-style outer joins you can run into ORA-01417, which requires nesting (outer joining to a subquery) or ANSI joins. – Adam Musch Apr 29 '11 at 15:13
    
Thanks. This works!. I agree that proprietary syntax is not very neat. Just wanted to know in what way it's capable of doing what ANSI join does. – komedit1 Apr 29 '11 at 15:15

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