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Lets say, the code looks something like this:

if(!$test) {
  header("Location: somefile.html");
  ...some PHP code....
  header("Location: anotherfile.html");
}

Is 'some PHP code' above executed? If yes, then what happens to further HTTP response(s) therein (eg.: the second 'header' statement in the code)?

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3  
Have you tried ? – hsz Apr 29 '11 at 15:07
1  
Well it redirects to somefile.html and stops. But I am curious about what happens in the background. – check123 Apr 29 '11 at 15:08
3  
You can configure some browsers not to follow the redirection, so if you protect a secured page with that, well someone can still access the page... tricky – Matthieu Napoli Apr 29 '11 at 15:15
    
@Matthieu: Helpful insight! – check123 Apr 29 '11 at 15:18
up vote 15 down vote accepted

Yes - the code will be executed.

The header() will configure the headers to be returned, not send them right away.

  • If there is no output between the 2 calls, then only the last one will be taken into account.

  • However, if you output anything before the second call, then the headers will be sent, and the second call will result in an error (headers already sent).

A classic mistake is : redirect and not exit() right after that, which can cause security problems.

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1  
Well, redirect followed by die()...precisely what I am doing! – check123 Apr 29 '11 at 15:18
2  
Well then that's good ! What I do is use a self made function for this (something named redirect($url)) that will change the headers and exit. That way you only use this, never header(), and don't have to worry about forgetting exit(). – Matthieu Napoli Apr 29 '11 at 15:21

the rule is when doing a header redirect put an exit right after:

if(!$test) {
  header("Location: somefile.html");
  exit;
  //wont ever run
  ...some PHP code....
  header("Location: anotherfile.html");
}

if you don't put the exit there is a chance that code following might run.

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Yes, 'some PHP code' will run. The Location header is just like any other header. It can only be sent if the script is done executing. Thus, any code in between, assuming there is no exit, has to be run before the header matters.

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some other code is executed.

header("Location: xxx");

doesnt stop execution of the code. and it might take some time for the browser to respond.

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header("Location: http://www.google.com");
$test = "Hi!";
header("Location: http://www.yahoo.com?t=" . $test);

This code takes my browser to: http://www.yahoo.com/?t=Hi!

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The code after header("location") is executed. You should use an exit(); if you don't want that :)

The redirection IS performed directly by the way, so you probably won't see the effect of things below the first header.

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