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// stock.h

#ifndef STOCK_H
#define STOCK_H

// declare Stock Class
class Stock
{
private:
    string StockExchange;
    string Symbol;
    string Company;
    double Price;
    int Shares;
public:
    Stock();
    Stock(string stockExchange, string symbol, string company, double price, int shares);
    void displayStockInfo();
    void setStockInfo(string stockExchange, string symbol, string company, double price, int shares);
    double getValue();
    bool operator < (Stock & aStock);
    bool Stock::operator > (Stock & aStock);
};

#endif

[break]

//main.cpp

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <fstream>

#include "stock.h"

using std::string;
using std::endl;
using std::cout;
using std::setw;
using std::ifstream;


// *******************************
// Stock class

Stock::Stock() {
    StockExchange = "";
    Symbol = "";
    Company = "";
    Price = 0.0;
    Shares = 0;
}

Stock::Stock(string stockExchange, string symbol, string company, double price, int shares) {
    StockExchange = stockExchange;
    Symbol = symbol;
    Company = company;
    Price = price;
    Shares = shares;
}


// end Stock class
// *******************************

...

My error says something along the lines of "no instance of overloaded function Stock::Stock(string stockExchange, string symbol, string company, double price, int shares) exists."

What am I doing wrong? I see it in my header file.

share|improve this question
    
"My error says..." Says where? Errors like that are usually reported at the point of the call. I don't see any calls in the code you provided. –  AndreyT Apr 29 '11 at 17:53
1  
Post the code and the actual error message at the line that the compiler reports the error. –  nbt Apr 29 '11 at 17:54
    
Reduce your code to the smallest example needed to demonstrate the error, and re-post the result in its entirety. –  NPE Apr 29 '11 at 17:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You've not included <string> header file in stock.h header file, even though you're using std::string in it. Maybe that is causing this error message (if that is the case, then I would say its really a bad message).

Another problem is that in Stock class definition, you've written this:

bool Stock::operator > (Stock & aStock);

which is wrong. Remove Stock:: from it, and make it like this:

bool operator > (const Stock & aStock);
               //^^^^ add this also (better)

Stock:: is required when defining the function outside the class.

share|improve this answer
    
Is this because an undeclared type is automatically an int? –  schoetbi Apr 29 '11 at 17:57
    
@schoetbi Not in c++. –  nbt Apr 29 '11 at 18:00
    
Seems like that was the problem. I'm very confused where to put #include s and similar things. Should they go in the header files? What happens if my header files #include <string> then my main.cpp also contains #include <string>. Won't I get a compiling error? –  Skinner927 Apr 29 '11 at 18:01
1  
@schoetbi: No. There's no such rule in C++ (neither in C). Undeclared type leads to a compile error. –  AndreyT Apr 29 '11 at 18:01
1  
@Skinner927 - No, you won't get a compiling error. For all of the standard headers, you are allowed to include them as many times as you like, in any order that you like. For your own headers, you may want to investigate include guards. –  Robᵩ Apr 29 '11 at 18:19

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