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I would like to run a python script during the night and so I was thinking of using APScheduler. I'll start running it at 1am of the following night and it will run once every night

my scheduler script looks like this (scheduler.py):

from apscheduler.scheduler import Scheduler
from datetime import datetime, timedelta, time, date

def myScript():
    print "ok"

if __name__ == '__main__':
    sched = Scheduler()
    startDate = datetime.combine(date.today() + timedelta(days=1),time(1))
    sched.start()
    sched.add_interval_job(myScript, start_date = startDate, days=1)

In the shell, I do: python myScheduler.py & disown (I'm running it remotely, so I want to run it in the background and disown it. Immediately, a number (PID) appears below the line, as every other python script would do. But when I do ps -e | grep python, that number is not there. I tried to do kill -9 PID and I got a message saying that the job does not exist.

Is the scheduler running? If yes, how can I stop it? if not, what am I doing wrong?

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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

you have to keep the script running otherwise after the sched.add_interval_job(myScript, start_date = startDate, days=1), the script ends and stop. add a

import time

while True:
    time.sleep(10)
sched.shutdown()

after, and then, the scheduler will still be alive.

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exactly what I needed! Thank you Cedric! –  daydreamer Apr 3 '12 at 20:49
    
Why do you need sched.shutdown()? Will it ever get hit? –  cssndrx Jul 9 '12 at 14:31
    
@cssndrx : if you launch the application in a console (without the &), you will be able to stop it by pressing Ctrl + C, then in this case the sched.shutdown() will be reached –  Cédric Julien Jul 9 '12 at 14:37
1  
@CédricJulien Oh neat! Why is that? –  cssndrx Jul 9 '12 at 16:41
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The correct solution would be to tell the supervisor to not run as a daemon:

sched = Scheduler()
sched.daemonic = False

or

sched = Scheduler()
sched.configure({'apscheduler.daemonic': False})
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I like this solution, but it becomes impossible to kill the process without a sudo kill pid, any suggestions? –  L-R Jun 12 '13 at 15:26
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If you use version 2.1.0, you can also pass standalone=True parameter to the Scheduler constructor. Detail documents can be found here

from apscheduler.scheduler import Scheduler
from datetime import datetime, timedelta, time, date

def myScript():
    print "ok"

if __name__ == '__main__':
    sched = Scheduler(standalone=True)
    startDate = datetime.combine(date.today() + timedelta(days=1),time(1))
    sched.add_interval_job(myScript, start_date = startDate, days=1)
    sched.start()
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But for a standalone service to run it should have a job that never ends. Otherwise scheduler will end execution. And moreover it blocks your main thread and it actually becomes a pain when you are adding additional jobs after starting the scheduler. –  polavishnu Nov 15 '13 at 13:27
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here is my way:

from apscheduler.scheduler import Scheduler
def mainjob():
    print("It works!")

if __name__ == '__main__':
    sched = Scheduler()
    sched.start()
    sched.add_interval_job(mainjob,minutes=1)
    input("Press enter to exit.")
    sched.shutdown()
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