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I created ssl certificate using IIS 5.1 and generated a file certreq.txt. Now what is the next step to use this file. I am a developer and working on a site that is host on my local machine. Is is necessary to get license from any CA?

Please guide me ASAP.

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Please note that you do not get a license from the CA. You get your certificate signed by the CA. –  8DH May 1 '11 at 19:51
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3 Answers

You can create a self-signed cert, but that will not be very elegant for end users if this is a public website as there is the prompt about cert validity. Otherwise, yes you need to obtain a cert from a CA. I find the best is Verisign, although DEFINITELY not the cheapest. Others are Godaddy, CheapDomain, and pretty much any registrar can help with it.

The link is for 5.1, but you can find tutorials on all versions. For testing I would go the self signed route.

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The certificate generated from IIS, is a self-signed certificate, which can be used to test your website. However, if you run a public website from a self-signed certificate, every user will get a warning that the site is not safe. You will eventually need to get a license from a CA when you are ready to publish your site. Your domain host should provide an SSL certificate service, for something like $50-150/yr.

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Thanks for response. I only want to test my site on my personal pc until i deploy it on the server. I want to open a page with https:// . Now what i have to do? Just create certreq.txt, and give url to that page like https://. But what will be the impact of that certreq.txt file on that perticular webpage? –  liaqat Apr 29 '11 at 18:28
    
I will get license when i will deployee the site, but for testing what is the next step after creating self-signed certificate certreq.txt through iis? Please help me, as my work is stuck bcoz of this... –  liaqat Apr 29 '11 at 18:35
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You can either self sign the certificate or send it to the CA to avoid the do-not-trust this site prompt. SSLTools Manager is a nifty app that can send your csr to a CA. Not sure about the self-signing feature though.

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