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I have a class which manages access to a binary file. I want to open this file on first request and then keep it open until the instance of my class gets disposed. I have implemented it like so:

public class SomeService : IDisposable
{
    private BinaryReader _reader;

    public int ServiceFunction(...)
    {
        if (_reader == null)
            CreateReader();

        // Do something with _reader and return a result
    }

    private void CreateReader()
    {
        var stream = new FileStream("myFile", FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read);
        _reader = new BinaryReader(stream);
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (_reader != null)
            _reader.Dispose();
    }
}

I would then use the class this way:

using (var service = new SomeService())
{
    foreach (var item in someList)
    {
        // other stuff
        if (eventuallyTrue)
        {
            int result = service.ServiceFunction(item.SomeProperty);
            // other stuff
        }
    }
}

Questions:

  • Is it enough to call _reader.Dispose() or is it also necessary to dispose the FileStream explicitely?
  • If I need to dispose the FileStream too, can I modify the Dispose method like this:

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (_reader != null)
        {
            if (_reader.BaseStream != null)
                _reader.BaseStream.Dispose();
            _reader.Dispose();
            // Does the order of disposing matter here ?
        }
    }
    
  • Or do I need to hold the FileStream in a separate class variable private FileStream _stream and dispose this stream later?

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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Disposing of the _reader is enough.

But that is because of a peculiar 'feature' of the reader, it assumes ownership of the stream.

So as a general pattern for 2 related or unrelated Disposables it will not do. And therefore I would store the Stream as _stream and Dispose it in the end too, just to be safe and consistent. It certainly won't hurt.

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Disposing the reader will automatically dispose the underlying stream so you don't need to do it explicitly.

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The current implementation of BinaryReader.Dispose and StreamReader.Dispose always forces the underlying stream to be Disposed/Closed. There is no workaround.

But:

Microsoft team is planning to fix this in the next version of .NET.

http://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/361389/allow-binaryreader-and-streamreader-to-wrap-a-stream-without-disposing-it

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Thanks for this link. I decided to follow the advice of Henk Holterman to dispose both reader and stream explicitely. The link confirms that it seems to be good to do so for future compatibility, even though it is redundant at the moment. –  Slauma Apr 29 '11 at 23:26
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