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I am trying to understand Java Iterator and Iterable interfaces

I am writing this class

class MyClass implements Iterable<String>{
    public String[] a=null;
    public MyClass(String[] arr){
        a=arr;  
    }
    public MyClassIterator iterator(){
        return new MyClassIterator(this);
    }

    public class MyClassIterator implements Iterator<String>{
        private MyClass myclass=null;
        private int count=0;
        public MyClassIterator(MyClass m){
            myclass=m;  
        }

        public boolean hasNext(){
            if(count<myclass.a.length){
                return true;
            }else{
                return false;

            }
        }
        public String next(){
            int t = count;
            count++;
            return myclass.a[t];
        }

        public void remove(){
            throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
        }
    }   
}

It seems working.

Should I have

Myclass implements Iterable<Stirng>,Iterator<String>{

}

Or I should put MyClassIterator outside MyClass as

class MyClass implements Iterable<String>{
    public String[] a=null;
    public MyClass(String[] arr){
        a=arr;  
    }
    public MyClassIterator iterator(){
        return new MyClassIterator(this);
    }


}


    public class MyClassIterator implements Iterator<String>{
        private MyClass myclass=null;
        private int count=0;
        public MyClassIterator(MyClass m){
            myclass=m;  
        }

        public boolean hasNext(){
            if(count<myclass.a.length){
                return true;
            }else{
                return false;

            }
        }
        public String next(){
            int t = count;
            count++;
            return myclass.a[t];
        }

        public void remove(){
            throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
        }
    }   

Which one is better?

Thanks

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1  
Why does your class need to do both? In general you would implement Iterable so someone can get an Iterator from your class. –  Kal Apr 29 '11 at 19:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 19 down vote accepted

You should almost never implement both Iterable and Iterator in the same class. They do different things. An iterator is naturally stateful - as you iterate using it, it has to update its view of the world. An iterable, however, only needs to be able to create new iterators. In particular, you could have several iterators working over the same original iterable at the same time.

Your current approach is pretty much okay - there are aspects of the implementation I'd change, but it's fine in terms of the separation of responsibilities.

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thanks, i updated a bit my question, which one is better, how about put MyClassInterator outside MyClass? –  icn Apr 29 '11 at 19:01
2  
@icn: Keeping MyClassIterator as a nested class is fine. (Iterator though, not Interator.) I suggest you make it a private static final class though. You don't need to be able to refer to it directly from anywhere else, after all. –  Jon Skeet Apr 29 '11 at 19:03
    
@icn: You should keep MyClassIterator inside MyClass. You should also make it private and make the method return Iterator<String>. You should also not pass in MyClass to the constructor because MyClassIterator is an inner class and has an implicit reference to the surrounding instance of MyClass, so you can just access the array a directly in it. –  ColinD Apr 29 '11 at 19:04
1  
@Jon - why would you make the inner class static? –  Stephen Swensen Apr 29 '11 at 19:10
1  
@Jon: Iterators are often (including in this case) perfect for non-static inner classes though. He's not using the implicit reference to the outer class but... he should be! =) –  ColinD Apr 29 '11 at 19:47

You were on track with your first try. MyClass only needs to implement Iterable<String>, which in turn requires you to provide an Iterator<String> implementation to return from Iterable<String>.iterator().

There's no need to put the MyClassIterator outside of MyClass because in most cases you will never even need to directly use the Iterator<String> (it's used implicitly by the for .. in .. syntax on Iterable<String>s), and in all other cases the interface is sufficient unless you actually add additional behavior to the implementation (which you likely won't ever need to do).

Here's how I'd do it, see comments inlined:

import java.util.Iterator;

class MyClass implements Iterable<String>{
    public String[] a=null; //make this final if you can
    public MyClass(String[] arr){
        a=arr; //maybe you should copy this array, for fear of external modification
    }

    //the interface is sufficient here, the outside world doesn't need to know
    //about your concrete implementation.
    public Iterator<String> iterator(){
        //no point implementing a whole class for something only used once
        return new Iterator<String>() {
            private int count=0;
            //no need to have constructor which takes MyClass, (non-static) inner class has access to instance members
            public boolean hasNext(){
                //simplify
                return count < a.length;
            }
            public String next(){
                return a[count++]; //getting clever
            }

            public void remove(){
                throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
            }
        };
    }
}
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Thanks, since we have a exception "throw new UnsupportedOperationException();", somewhere in the program we should specify that an excepriton to be throwed something like throw UnsupportedOperationException()? –  icn Apr 29 '11 at 21:09
    
Your welcome, @icn. Yes, it's probably sufficient to just mention it in the comments for iterator(). In practice it won't matter, for .. in .. is pretty much the only construct which makes direct use of Iterators in (modern) Java and it doesn't attempt to use remove. Indeed, "optional" interface members such as remove are useless at best since consumers pretty much have to assume they will throw. –  Stephen Swensen Apr 29 '11 at 22:03

You should not do Myclass implements Iterable<String>,Iterator<String>{ since iterators are single-use. With the exception of list iterators, there's no way to return them to the start.

Incidentally, you can skip the

MyClass myClass;
public MyClassInterator(MyClass m){
  myclass=m;  
}

and instead of referencing

myClass

reference

MyClass.this

Your inner class is not static, so MyClass.this will reference the instance of the enclosing class that created it.

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