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I came across the following in How to Think Like a Computer Scientist (here):

def recursive_sum(nested_num_list):
    sum = 0
    for element in nested_num_list:
        if type(element) == type([]):
            sum = sum + recursive_sum(element)
        else:
            sum = sum + element
    return sum

I was shocked by the use of type(element) == type([]). Not only is it bad practice, but this function won't work for any other sequence types. Polymorphism is the typical way of avoiding type comparisons, but can't be used here. How could one avoid the type comparison in such a case? I considered:

def recursive_sum(nested_sum_list):
    sum = 0
    for element in nested_num_list:
        try:
            sum += element
        except TypeError:
            sum += recursive_sum(element)
    return sum

which makes the function applicable to other sequences, but is still kinda gross. Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
duck typing FTW! – Tom Apr 29 '11 at 19:10
up vote 2 down vote accepted

"sum" functions takes an iterable, so I would check the element implements the __iter__ method or not,using "hasattr" builtin function.

Like this:

def recursive_sum(nested_num_list):
    sum = 0
    for element in nested_num_list:
        if hasattr(element, '__iter__'):
            sum = sum + recursive_sum(element)
        else:
            sum = sum + element
    return sum
share|improve this answer
2  
Note that there are iterables that don't have the __iter__ attribute. To test if an object is iterable, use either try: iter(x); except TypeError: ... or isinstance(x, collections.Iterable). – Sven Marnach Apr 29 '11 at 19:14
    
iter(x) would return True for string, which you would want to avoid if your real purpose list-like collection flattening. isinstance(x, collections.Sequence) is a better choice – Imran Apr 29 '11 at 19:19
    
@Imram: In the case of a recursive sum no strings should occur anywhere in the nested sequence, but it is perfectly sensible to have a list containing generators, like [repeat(3, 10), repeat(1, 5)]. That's why I would prefer to test for Iterable here. – Sven Marnach Apr 29 '11 at 19:24
    
Sven - Any examples of iterables don't have __iter__? I can post a separate question for this if desired. – Bryan Head Apr 29 '11 at 19:37
1  
@Bryan: This has been discussed on SO before. Unfortunately, the only example I remember right now are strings, somehow voiding the point of my first comment to this post... – Sven Marnach Apr 29 '11 at 19:55

You can check if an element is a sequence by using isinstance(element, collections.Sequence).

share|improve this answer
    
Strings are sequences. If you want to not treat them as such, you'd have to make an exception for them. – Boaz Yaniv Apr 29 '11 at 22:51

For the flattening of an aribtrarily nested list, you will always need some kind of check to test if an element is itself an iterable or a leaf node. I wouldn't combine the flattening with computing the sum in one function, but rather define a generator function that only does the flattening:

def flatten(x):
    try:
        it = iter(x)
    except TypeError:
        yield x
    else:
        for i in it:
            for j in flatten(i):
                yield j

This way, you will have all the ugly bits contained in a single function. For a nested sequence x, you can now do

sum(flatten(x))

to get the recursive sum.

share|improve this answer

Things that are true of a list:

>>> import collections
>>> hasattr(element, '__getitem__')
True
>>> not hasattr(element, 'keys')
True
>>> isinstance(element, collections.Sequence)
True
>>> hasattr(element, '__iter__')
True

Things that are true of a string:

>>> string = '1234'
>>> hasattr(string, '__getitem__')
True
>>> not hasattr(string, 'keys')
True
>>> isinstance(string, collections.Sequence)
True
>>> hasattr(string, '__iter__')
False
share|improve this answer

What you see here isn't polymorphism in any language I know. += for lists means one thing, for numbers another thing. You'd like += for lists to mean something unusual (sum up all elements and return the sum) - but this is only meaningful for your specific example. For other (most, I'd say) uses of lists, the original meaning of += is much more convenient.

To make this behave truly polymorphically, you can derive from list and make += mean what you want - then you won't need these hacks.

BTW:

if type(element) == type([]):

Should be rewritten to:

if isinstance(element, list):
share|improve this answer
    
In a statically typed language, you could just overload the function with a function that has a different type signature. – Bryan Head Apr 29 '11 at 19:28

The purpose of this function is not to be universally applicable for adding nested structures, it was simply created to illustrate recursion.

Adding more complex sequence type checking, try and except, or the ability to add something other than numbers would make the function less useful as a learning tool for recursion.

That being said, isinstance(element, (list, tuple)) would probably be more appropriate here, and it wouldn't add any complexity.

share|improve this answer

You were checking if the element can be added to a int, which is not what you wanted.

The try is not bad though: Try to use it as a iterable - if it works then it is a iterable:

def recursive_sum(nested_sum_list):
    sum = 0
    # this raises TypeError if element is not a sequence
    for element in nested_num_list: 
        try:
            sum += recursive_sum(element)
        except TypeError:
            sum += element
    return sum

There is also a typeclass for iterables:

import collections
print isinstance(element, collections.Iterable)

which basically just searches for a __iter__ method.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice, but grossly inefficient - most sub-elements are probably numbers, not lists, so the exception will be thrown a lot – Eli Bendersky Apr 29 '11 at 19:08
    
This was actually the first thing that came to mind, but then I realized that "checking if the element can be added to a int" was functionally equivalent for the vast majority of cases, computationally superior, and (arguably) semantically more accurate. It does invert the logic of the original function, but that's fine. Anyway, thanks for presenting this alternative. – Bryan Head Apr 29 '11 at 19:24
    
@Bryan Head: Yeah, it probably makes more sense in this function, but you asked a different question: How to identify iterables, and I tried to answer that question :-) – Jochen Ritzel Apr 29 '11 at 19:31

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