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a, b, c = 0, 1, 2
[a, b, c].find(&:zero?) # => 0

Is there any method that finds the first element for which the block returns false?

[a, b, c].the_method(&:zero?) # => 1

In other words, it would behave the same way as:

[a, b, c].reject(&:zero?).first
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reject(...).first seems like what you're after -- what's wrong with that? –  Joseph Weissman Apr 29 '11 at 19:38
3  
what about using Proc ? [a, b, c].find{|i| i != 0 } –  konus Apr 29 '11 at 19:45
2  
@Joe the problem with that is you loop through the entire collection and create a full array of all matching values, and then throw them all out. The beauty of find is that it stops iterating as soon as it find the first matching value. –  Phrogz Apr 29 '11 at 20:03
2  
In general no, but here: [1,2,3].find(&:nonzero?) # => 1 :-) –  Marc-André Lafortune Apr 29 '11 at 20:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There is not, but you could create one either the clean-ish way:

a = [0,2,1,0,3]

module Enumerable
  def first_not(&block)
    find{ |x| !block[x] }
  end
end

p a.first_not(&:zero?)
#=> 2

...or the horribly-amusing hack way:

class Proc
  def !
    proc{ |o,*a| !self[o,*a] }
  end
end

p a.find(&!(:zero?.to_proc))
#=> 2

...or the terse-but-terribly-dangerous way:

class Symbol
  def !
    proc{ |o,*a| !o.send(self,*a) }
  end
end

p a.find(&!:zero?)
#=> 2

But I'd advocate just skipping the tricky Symbol#to_proc usage and saying what you want:

p a.find{ |i| !i.zero? }
#=> 2
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As far as I can tell there is not a standard method to do this (given that find_all and reject reference each other, but find does not reference anything). If you need it frequently (especially if the reject is too slow) you can write your own

module Enumerable

  def first_reject(&block)
    find {|a| not (block.call(a)) }
  end

end
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I do, however, agree with Phrogz that just writing out the function is usually best. –  Kathy Van Stone Apr 29 '11 at 22:13

If you're using Ruby 2.0, you may be able to do lazy.reject(&:zero?).first without the performance penalty of going through the full array.

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