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I'm trying to make a JButton on a JDialog, but, the button will cover the entire JDialog, any help on this? This is what it looks like: enter image description here

This is how I create the JDialog and the JButton:

    class MenuStoreHandler implements ActionListener{
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e){

        Dimension dim = Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().getScreenSize();
        int screenWidth = (int) dim.getWidth();
        int screenHeight = (int) dim.getHeight();

        JDialog g = new JDialog();
        g.setTitle("The Store");
        g.setSize(200, 200);
        g.setLocation(screenWidth / 2 - 150, screenHeight / 2 - 150);


        JButton b = new JButton("Buy");
        b.addActionListener( new StoreItem1Handler() );
        b.setVisible(true);
        g.add(b);

        g.setVisible(true);
    }
}

I'm just going to post my full MrStan.class, here it is:

package Progress;

public class MrStan extends JPanel{

private Timer timer = new Timer();
public static int points;
static File h = new File("text.txt");
public ImageIcon bg = new ImageIcon("D:/MrStan/bg.png");
static JMenuBar menubar;
Formatter x;
JMenu menu;
JMenuItem menuitem;

double version = 0.3;

class todoTask extends TimerTask{
    public void run(){ 
        points += 1;
        repaint();
    }
}

public int getPoints(){
    return points;
}

public void setPoints( int points ){
    this.points = points;
}

public MrStan(){
    setIgnoreRepaint(true);

    menubar = new JMenuBar();
    menu = new JMenu("Menu");
    menu.setMnemonic(KeyEvent.VK_F);
    menu.getAccessibleContext().setAccessibleDescription("Menu");
    menubar.add(menu);

    menuitem = new JMenuItem("Store (S)", new ImageIcon("coins.png"));
    menuitem.setMnemonic(KeyEvent.VK_S);
    menuitem.addActionListener( new MenuStoreHandler() );
    menu.add(menuitem);

    menuitem = new JMenuItem("Reset Points (R)", new ImageIcon("delete.png"));
    menuitem.setMnemonic(KeyEvent.VK_R);
    menuitem.addActionListener( new MenuResetPointHandler() );
    menu.add(menuitem);

    // add a separator
    menu.addSeparator();

    menuitem = new JMenuItem("Exit (E)", new ImageIcon("cross.png"));
    menuitem.setMnemonic(KeyEvent.VK_E);
    menuitem.addActionListener( new MenuExitHandler() );
    menu.add(menuitem);

    timer.schedule(new todoTask(), 0, 2000);

}

class MenuStoreHandler implements ActionListener{
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e){

        Dimension dim = Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().getScreenSize();
        int screenWidth = (int) dim.getWidth();
        int screenHeight = (int) dim.getHeight();

        JDialog g = new JDialog();
        g.setTitle("The Store");
        g.setSize(200, 200);
        g.setLocation(screenWidth / 2 - 150, screenHeight / 2 - 150);


        JButton b = new JButton("Buy");
        b.addActionListener( new StoreItem1Handler() );
        b.setVisible(true);
        g.add(b);

        g.setVisible(true);
    }
}

class StoreItem1Handler implements ActionListener{
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e){
        System.out.println("Store-Button 1 pressed.");
    }
}

class MenuExitHandler implements ActionListener{
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e){
        System.exit(1);
    }
}

class MenuResetPointHandler implements ActionListener{
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e){
        points = 0;
        repaint();
        JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Points have been reset.");
    }
}

public void paint(Graphics g){
    g.setColor(Color.WHITE);
    bg.paintIcon(this,g,0,0);
    g.setColor(Color.BLACK);
    g.drawString("Points: " + points, 75, 95);
    g.drawString("Version: " + version, 2, 10);
}

public static void main(String[] args){

    final MrStanCreateFile g = new MrStanCreateFile();

    Runtime.getRuntime().addShutdownHook(new Thread(new Runnable(){
        public void run(){
            if(h.exists()){
                g.openFile();
                g.addRecords();
                g.closeFile();
            }else{
                System.out.println(h.getName() + "does not exist, not saving.");
            }
        }
    }, "Shutdown-thread"));

    readIt();

    //Create new JFrame
    JFrame frame = new JFrame();
    frame.setTitle("MrStan");
    frame.setSize(200, 200);
    frame.setDefaultCloseOperation( JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE );
    frame.setJMenuBar(menubar);

    //Set location of JFrame
    Dimension dim = Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().getScreenSize();
    int screenWidth = (int) dim.getWidth();
    int screenHeight = (int) dim.getHeight();
    frame.setLocation(screenWidth / 2 - 200, screenHeight / 2 - 200);

    //Set ContentPane to JPanel
    MrStan panel = new MrStan();
    frame.setContentPane(panel);

    //Make the user not be able to resize
    frame.setResizable(false);

    //Make the JFrame visible
    frame.setVisible(true);

}

public static void readIt(){
        MrStanReadFile r = new MrStanReadFile();
        r.openFile();
        r.readFile();
        r.closeFile();
}

}

Why is this covering my ENTIRE JDialog? I'm using the basic Layout Manager, it should just be fine.

share|improve this question
2  
Why are you still using a "null layout". Every is spending time giveing you this same advice! You have been advised the proper way to create a GUI is to use layout managers so you don't have to reinvent the wheel and solve layout problems on your own. Code Swing programs the way they where designed to be coded and you won't have these problems. Also, why are you extending JPanel? There is no need to do this. Read the Swing tutorial, follow the examples and learn how to use Swing properly so you aren't asking all these questions! – camickr Apr 29 '11 at 21:46
    
Camickr, I agree that the @OP didn't writte conventional Swing code, but actually, exteding JPanel can be useful, for example if you want to distribute the same application both as a standalone jar file for desktop usage and an Applet (you just add the same panel to a JFrame and a JApplet). I've seen this pattern being applied before. – Anthony Accioly Apr 29 '11 at 22:06
    
@Anthony Accioly, yes extending JPanel is the way you should create a GUI. Look at all the examples in the Swing tutorial. However, extending JPanel is done when you actually add components to the panel so you can then add the panel to the GUI later on. This class is used strictly to create a JDialog and it does nothing else. It has absolutely nothing to do with a JPanel. It should really just be a method that you can invoke. – camickr Apr 30 '11 at 1:30
1  
@Anthony @camickr -1 for extending JPanel just for convience: it's meant to be a concrete container for holding chidren. Every subclass that adds nothing to that base functionality is mis-using inheritance. Always. – kleopatra Apr 30 '11 at 10:04
1  
@kleopatra: One counter-point. It is not possible to create an applet without extending (J)Applet, even if no extra methods are necessary. – Andrew Thompson May 6 '11 at 16:30
up vote 3 down vote accepted
+50

Try adding the button to the contentPane first and setting the bounds later.

Container pane = dialog.getContentPane();
pane.setLayout(null);
JButton button = new JButton("Testbutton!");
pane.add(button);
button.setBounds(10,10,40,40);
share|improve this answer
    
And here is the reference: download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/uiswing/layout/none.html – Anthony Accioly Apr 29 '11 at 20:41
4  
That may be the way the tutorial does it, but it will make no difference. All that matters is that the components have a proper location and size when it comes time to paint the component. – camickr Apr 29 '11 at 21:48
    
Yeah, you are right. The real problem was the setVisible – Anthony Accioly Apr 29 '11 at 22:01
    
After some tweaking this actually worked, thanks. – Stan May 6 '11 at 17:45
    
Thanks @Stan. Don't forget to reward @camickr or me with the bounty. – Anthony Accioly May 6 '11 at 18:29

Seems to work fine for me. Did you do call setLayout(null) for the dialog?

This is what I tried

JDialog dialog = new JDialog();
dialog.setSize(300, 200);
dialog.setLayout(null);



JButton button = new JButton("Testbutton!");
button.setVisible(true);
button.setBounds(10,10,40,40);
dialog.add(button);

//Make dialog visible
dialog.setVisible(true);

And usually it's not a good practice to not use a layout manager. Things can get complicated very quickly. Layout Managers help a lot.

share|improve this answer
2  
1+. It is better to use a simple layout manager such as FlowLayout, GridLayout or BorderLayout than nothing. – Anthony Accioly Apr 29 '11 at 20:44

The real problem for you code is that you add the components to the dialog AFTER you set the dialog visible. The second setVisible() does nothing because its already visible.

That is why you should be learning from the examples in the Swing tutorial. The examples show you the proper way to create a simple GUI.

share|improve this answer

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