Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I apologize because this topic comes up a lot, but I have not been able to have this adequately explained in anything I've read today.

I am trying to make a simple collection class (and learn about javascript prototyping at the same time) designed to store objects with a "name" property and lets its members be accessed by index or value. So far I've got this:

function Collection() {}
Collection.prototype.constructor = Collection;
Collection.prototype._innerList = [];
Collection.prototype._xref = {};
Collection.prototype.count = function () { return this._innerList.length; };
Collection.prototype.add = function (obj) {
    this._xref[obj.name] = this._innerList.push(obj) - 1;
}
Collection.prototype.get = function (id) {
    if (typeof id == "string") {
        return this._innerList[this._xref[id]];
    } else {
        return this._innerList[id];
    }
};

http://jsfiddle.net/YrVFZ/

The problem:

var foo = new Collection();
foo.add({name: "someitem", value:"hello world"});   // foo.count()== 1

var bar= new Collection();
bar.add({name: "someotheritem", value:"hello world"}); // bar.count()== 2

Hmm...

Basically, the new instance bar is created with all the properties having the current values of the data in foo. I know I can fix this by putting _xref, etc. inside the constructor, but I'm trying to understand how prototyping works. If I create a new instance, and make changes to the data in that instance, why would those values carry over when I create another new instance?

If I make further changes to a property from the prototype of foo or bar they are independent, so it doesn't seem as if I'm somehow referencing the same instance of anything. So what is causing bar to be instantiated with the current values from foo?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Consider a classroom full of students. Putting something on the prototype is like putting something on the white board for them all to see. When you're declaring

Collection.prototype._innerList = [];

you're giving every collection that property; regardless of calling new Collection() any changes to the white board affects all students. However, if you define it within the constructor, or one of the functions as this.variableName = [], each copy will have its own variableName, like handing each student a handout. Obviously, there's some cases when it's okay to have something on the white board, such as instructions that will be universal from student to student, but if each item is going to be different for each student, it should be an individual property. Hope this explanation makes sense...

You want to be doing this.

function Collection() {
    if (!this instanceof Collection)
        return new Collection();
    this._innerList = [];
    this._xref = {};

    return this;
}

Collection.prototype.count = function() {
    return this._innerList.length;
};
Collection.prototype.add = function(obj) {
    this._xref[obj.name] = this._innerList.push(obj) - 1;
}
Collection.prototype.get = function(id) {
    if (typeof id == "string") {
        return this._innerList[this._xref[id]];
    } else {
        return this._innerList[id];
    }
};

var foo = new Collection();
foo.add({name: "someitem", value:"hello world"});   
console.log(foo.count()); // 1

var bar= new Collection();
bar.add({name: "someotheritem", value:"hello world"});
console.log(bar.count()); // 1

http://jsfiddle.net/vXbLL/

Edit

Not really relevant to your question, but it's something I do so I will throw it out there. Whenever I'm doing something on the prototype, if I'm not returning something, I return this. It allows chaining, so you could do instance.function1().function2().function3() as long as function1 and function2 return this.

share|improve this answer
2  
So basically, if you use a field in a prototype it functions like a static field? –  Jamie Treworgy Apr 29 '11 at 22:07
    
Yeah, anything on the prototype is only in memory once. –  Robert Apr 29 '11 at 22:09
1  
Great, thanks. Makes sense. There is so much written out there but none of it seems oriented towards people like me who can't seem to stop thinking about things in an conventional OO inheritance way. Also can you explain the first bit? Does that just allow you to create a new instance without the word new? –  Jamie Treworgy Apr 29 '11 at 22:13
    
Yeah, it's just a catch if you forget the new. It's better to use the new, but I include that out of habit. –  Robert Apr 29 '11 at 22:37
add comment

You can think of a prototype as giving all objects of that class shared variables. Like static variables in a c++ class if that makes any sense. That's ok to do for functions because they're all the same for each instance of the class. However, if you want the object to have its own non-shared variable, you shouldn't use the prototype. One simple way to do it is to assign them in the constructor method like this:

function Collection() 
{
this._innerList = [];
this._xref = {};
}

Collection.prototype.count = function () { return this._innerList.length; };
Collection.prototype.add = function (obj) {
    this._xref[obj.name] = this._innerList.push(obj) - 1;
}
Collection.prototype.get = function (id) {
    if (typeof id == "string") {
        return this._innerList[this._xref[id]];
    } else {
        return this._innerList[id];
    }
};

var foo = new Collection();
foo.add({name: "someitem", value:"hello world"});   // foo.count()== 1
document.write(foo.count(),"<br>");

var bar= new Collection();
bar.add({name: "someotheritem", value:"hello world"}); // bar.cou
document.write(bar.count(),"<br>");
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, also a good explanation. The other guy was here first but I gave you an upvote. –  Jamie Treworgy Apr 29 '11 at 22:13
    
Ack. Always a bridesmaid, never a bride :-) Thanks for the upvote. –  Brian Rothstein Apr 30 '11 at 1:27
    
A better answer, I think. The comparison with statics makes it clear. –  GolezTrol Dec 17 '12 at 19:20
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.