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Let's say I have two existing tables, "dogs" and "cats":

 dog_name | owner
 ---------+------
 Sparky   | Bob
 Rover    | Bob
 Snoopy   | Chuck
 Odie     | Jon

 cat_name | owner
 ---------+------
 Garfield | Jon
 Muffy    | Sam
 Stupid   | Bob

How do I write a query with this output?

 owner | num_dogs | num_cats
 ------+----------+---------
 Bob   |     2    |    1
 Chuck |     1    |    0
 Sam   |     0    |    1
 Jon   |     1    |    1

The answer I've got is the next query

select owner, sum(num_dogs), sum(num_cats) from
  (select owner, 1 as num_dogs, 0 as num_cats from dogs
   union
   select owner, 0 as num_dogs, 1 as num_cats from cats)
group by owner

but the problem is that sql doesn't support "select * from (select...)" type of query

Instead, there has to be a table name after "from".

Unfortunately I can't afford myself to have temporary table or a table created with "select into" clause. I need some workaround for the proposed solution where a nested select clause is formed in this way.

What's your opinion?

Cheers

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What kind of database engine is this? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Feb 24 '09 at 22:29
    
it seems to me your "dogs" and "cats" tables are begging to be combined into a "pets" table with the columns (name, owner, type). then you'd do select owner, type, count(name) from pets group by owner, type. I think. Didn't test the query. –  rmeador Feb 24 '09 at 23:03

10 Answers 10

up vote 4 down vote accepted

My SQL does, just need to name the table... What database are you using?

 select owner, sum(num_dogs), sum(num_cats) from
  (select owner, 1 as num_dogs, 0 as num_cats from dogs
   union all
   select owner, 0 as num_dogs, 1 as num_cats from cats) as g
 group by owner
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry. I was sure I tried it. It works fine with naming after parenthesis. thanks. –  kobac Feb 24 '09 at 22:12
    
This query is incorrect. As is it assumes the the whole list of owners is in both tables. Even if you change it to LEFT OUTER JOIN, you are assuming the list of owners is wholly in the primary table. To get the accurate list you need to use the UNION ALL approach. –  Will Rickards Feb 24 '09 at 22:14
    
You're right. I copied his sql and just added an alias –  Tom Ritter Feb 24 '09 at 22:20
    
This produces incorrect results... must be UNION ALL. –  user53794 Feb 24 '09 at 22:32
create table cats (cat_name varchar(8), owner varchar(8))
create table dogs (dog_name varchar(8), owner varchar(8))
create table owners (owner varchar(8))

insert into owners values ('Jon')
insert into owners values ('Bob')
insert into owners values ('Chuck')
insert into owners values ('Sam')

insert into dogs values ('Sparky', 'Bob')
insert into dogs values ('Rover', 'Bob')
insert into dogs values ('Snoopy', 'Chuck')
insert into dogs values ('Odie', 'Jon')

insert into cats values ('Garfield', 'Jon')
insert into cats values ('Muffy', 'Sam')
insert into cats values ('Stupid', 'Bob')

select 
    owners.owner,
    count(distinct dog_name) as num_dogs,
    count(distinct cat_name) as num_cats
from 
    owners
        left outer join dogs on dogs.owner = owners.owner
        left outer join cats on cats.owner = owners.owner
group by owners.owner

Note that count(dog_name) should probably be count(dog_id)... multiple dogs can have same name different owners (heck... same name same owner is probably allowed).

Note the addition of DISTINCT to the count(..) to correct problem.

share|improve this answer
    
this solution doesn't give a correct answer. –  kobac Feb 24 '09 at 22:46
    
Uhm... yes it does: owner num_dogs num_cats Bob 2 1 Chuck 1 0 Jon 1 1 Sam 0 1 –  user53794 Feb 25 '09 at 0:08
  1. I'd say you need to add UNION ALL io just UNION to make this query work.
  2. You need to name your inner select.

    SELECT * FROM (SELECT * FROM Table) MyInnerSelect

A better solution would be to create a table Owner and join the dog & cat tables.

share|improve this answer

"but the problem is that sql doesn't support "select * from (select...)" type of query"

Sure it does. you just need to give it a name like "select * from (select...)a"

share|improve this answer

Here's another method, just for fun.

select o.owner, nd.numdogs, nc.numcats
from owners o
left join (select owner, count(dog_name) as numdogs
           from dogs
           group by owner) nd on nd.owner=o.owner
left join (select owner, count(cat_name) as numcats
           from cats
           group by owner) nc on nc.owner=o.owner
share|improve this answer
    
SQL execution plan comes out faster than currently accepted answer, too :) –  Blorgbeard Feb 24 '09 at 22:49

You need to alias the subquery.

select owner, sum(num_dogs), sum(num_cats)
from (
    select owner, 1 as num_dogs, 0 as num_cats from dogs
    union all
    select owner, 0 as num_dogs, 1 as num_cats from cats
) a
group by owner

Notice the a immediately following the subquery.

share|improve this answer
    
This would be correct if it had a union all –  Sam Saffron Feb 24 '09 at 23:01

You need to alias the subquery:

select sq.owner, sum(sq.num_dogs), sum(sq.num_cats) from
    (select owner, 1 as num_dogs, 0 as num_cats from dogs
     union
     select owner, 0 as num_dogs, 1 as num_cats from cats
    ) as sq
group by sq.owner
share|improve this answer
select
coalesce (d.owner, c.owner),
count(distinct d.dog_name) as num_dogs,
count(distinct c.cat_name) as num_cats
from dogs d
full join cats c on d.owner = c.owner
group by coalesce (d.owner, c.owner)

only because I don't like unions and sub selects for some reason... :)

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Another take on this, more for highlighting different ways than necessarily performance.

In SQL Server -

SELECT 
ISNULL(c.owner, d.owner) AS owner, 
COUNT(d.dog_name) num_dogs, 
COUNT(c.cat_name) num_cats
FROM
dogs d
FULL OUTER JOIN 
cats c
ON 
d.owner = c.owner
GROUP BY
c.owner, d.owner
ORDER BY
ISNULL(c.owner, d.owner)
share|improve this answer

Can you create an owners table with all of the owner names? If so, the following query will give you the output you're after:

SELECT
     owners.owner,
     count(distinct dog_name),
     count(distinct cat_name)
FROM
     (
     Owners
     LEFT JOIN cats ON
          owners.owner = cats.owner
     )
LEFT JOIN dogs ON
     Owners.owner = dogs.owner
GROUP BY
     Owners.owner;
share|improve this answer

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