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I am programming in python using the pygame library.

I have created a class called "terrain" and have placed in it "terrainClass.py"

When I run the code, it will create instances of the terrain class, but will not run the __init__ method. This is causing me an error as when the terrain.__init__ method is called, it cannot call it's parent's class __init__ method which initializes variables needed by the engine.

However, if I move the code into a single file, everything works fine.

Here is the code:

terrainClass.py:

import pygame

class terrain(pygame.sprite.Sprite):
    """INSERT LONG DOC STRING"""
    def __init__(self, disp, x, y, w, h, ID):
        """INSERT ANOTHER LONG DOC STRING        """
        print "initing" #This is here for debugging purposes
        pygame.sprite.Sprite.__init__(self) #Need this to run
        print "working"

main.py:

import pygame
import os.path
from terrainClass import terrain

.............



    self.bgGroup = pygame.sprite.Group()

    i = 0
    j = 0
    #Set up background, reverse j and i as first index is row and second is colum
    for j in range(len(mapInfo)): #For each subarray in mapinfo
        for i in range(len(mapInfo[j])): #For each element in the subarray
            bg = terrain(self.screen, i * tileWidth, j * tileHeight, tileWidth, tileHeight, int(mapInfo[j][i]))
            self.bgGroup.add(bg)
        i = 0

What do I need to do in order to just have the code in a separate file?

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6  
post the traceback, its there to solve problem. –  Jochen Ritzel Apr 29 '11 at 23:01
    
I don't understand the problem. Can you demo the difference between the two behaviours? –  blubb Apr 29 '11 at 23:07
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1 Answer

Your code looks fine. The location of the class should make no difference with regards to the call to __init__, if imported correctly, and it seems you do import it correctly.

Perhaps you haven't analyzed the problem enough - how do you know the constructor doesn't get called? Can you try a simple main.py without the other code, which only imports terrain and creates an instance?

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Oh, seem to have found the problem. It seems like changes to the second file are not propagating when I save the second file. So now the question is how do I tell IDLE to re-import the modules? –  user731842 Apr 30 '11 at 16:33
    
@user731842: that's a different question. I suggest you create a new SO question for it, trying to describe the exact problem with the minimal code sample –  Eli Bendersky May 1 '11 at 3:11
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