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On the following code, how can i rewrite the for loop by using a std::for_each instruction. I tried to use boost::lambda::_1, boost::bind, but I could not make it working.

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>
#include <cstdlib>

int main() 
{ 
  std::vector<int(*)(const char*)> processors; 
  processors.push_back(std::atoi); 
  processors.push_back(reinterpret_cast<int(*)(const char*)>(std::strlen)); 

  const char data[] = "1.23"; 

  for(std::vector<int(*)(const char*)>::iterator it = processors.begin();
      it != processors.end(); ++it) 
    std::cout << (*it)(data) << std::endl;
}

Any hint to help me solve this problem are welcome.

EDIT: Solution

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <boost/function.hpp>
#include <boost/lambda/lambda.hpp>
#include <boost/lambda/bind.hpp>

int main() 
{ 
  std::vector<boost::function<int(const char*)> > processors; 
  processors.push_back(std::atoi); 
  processors.push_back(std::strlen); 

  const char data[] = "1.23"; 

  namespace bl = boost::lambda;
  std::for_each(processors.begin(), processors.end(),
      std::cout << bl::bind(bl::_1, data) << "\n");
}
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4  
Note that casting between function-pointer types and then dereferencing them is undefined. –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 30 '11 at 0:50
    
What went wrong when you used std::for_each? What did you pass to for_each as the third parameter... i.e. the thing to do for each element of the range? –  Brian Rothstein Apr 30 '11 at 0:53
1  
Since you're already using Boost's functional implementation, you should be able to use boost::function<int(const char*)> instead of int(*)(const char*). It will handle the return-type conversion for std::strlen (from size_t to int). –  James McNellis Apr 30 '11 at 0:59
    
@Brian: I actually did tried something like that boost::bind(std::cout << boost::bind(_1, data) << "\n" and std::cout << (int(*)(const char*))boost::lambda::_1(data) << "\n" –  Phong Apr 30 '11 at 1:01
    
@James: you are right, I made the change. –  Phong Apr 30 '11 at 1:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If boost::lambda and '\n' instead of endl are allowed, does the following code meet the purpose?

namespace bl = boost::lambda;
std::for_each( processors.begin(), processors.end()
             , std::cout << bl::bind( bl::_1, data ) << '\n' );
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Yes i did tried it before but there is a compile error: it looks like it is not capable to recognize the type of bl::_1. –  Phong Apr 30 '11 at 5:35
    
Strange... For your information, the above code worked when I tested on VC2005 and ideone(gcc4.3.4). –  Ise Wisteria Apr 30 '11 at 8:07
    
I will check again –  Phong Apr 30 '11 at 8:13
    
You are right!, I misunderstood: boost::bind and boost::lambda::bind. It is working perfectly. Now i understand why all my previous attempt did fail. –  Phong Apr 30 '11 at 8:21
    
Glad it helped :-) –  Ise Wisteria Apr 30 '11 at 10:04
void blah(int (*func)(const char *), const char *data)
{
    std::cout << func(data) << std::endl;
};

...

std::for_each(processors.begin(), processors.end(), boost::bind(blah, _1, data));
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Thx for the answer, But i would like to avoid creating another class for this purpose. –  Phong Apr 30 '11 at 1:03
    
@Phong: See updated answer. –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 30 '11 at 1:10
    
I see..., Is it poosible to reproduce blah function using a boost::bind function ? I know it wont be really pretty. but it is for improving my understanding of boost::bind. –  Phong Apr 30 '11 at 2:41
    
I found my answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/5838679/… –  Phong Apr 30 '11 at 8:21

You might find it easier to use BOOST_FOREACH:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <boost/foreach.hpp>
#include <boost/function.hpp>

int main()
{
    typedef boost::function<int(const char*)> ProcessorFunc;
    std::vector<ProcessorFunc> processors;
    processors.push_back(std::atoi);
    processors.push_back(std::strlen);

    const char data[] = "1.23";

    BOOST_FOREACH(ProcessorFunc& proc, processors)
    {
        std::cout << proc(data) << std::endl;
    }

}

Or you could use a ranged-based for loop from C++0x.

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