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Can you please explain what's going on in this buggy example:

Base base; Derived* d = reinterpret_cast<Derived*> (&base);
d->method();
d->virtual_method();

//output: Derived-method() Base-virtual_method() 

I would expect this code to behave the other way around. Probably the compiler shares a single memory layout for Base and Derived, and of course the vtable is common.

  • When d->method is invoked I would expect the compiler to say "I'm just calling method at offset 0 with respect to my pointer. The pointer points to Base object, the only object around.
  • When d->virtual_method is invoked the compiler should say I am going to resolve it through the vtable, and thus the Derived method should be called (though the Base object is the only one around, the layout extends to Derived).

So I am expecting to see:

//output: Base-method() Derived-virtual_method()
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Could you post the rest of your code please? Your question is impossible to answer without seeing the declaration and implementation of Base and Derived. –  Greg Hewgill Apr 30 '11 at 3:45
    
The real code is far too complicated. Just define a Base and Derived objects with the obvious semantics. The void method and the void virtual method will print "<class>-<method name>". class Base { public: void method(); virtual void virtual_method(); }; class Derived : public Base { ... }; –  DominiqueT Apr 30 '11 at 3:57
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

base is a Base object; you reinterpret its bytes as a Derived object and then attempt to use it as if it were a Derived object. The behavior when you do this is undefined. Your program might crash; it might appear to do the right thing; it might make your computer light on fire.

Note that it is never correct to use reinterpret_cast to cast up and down a class hierarchy. You must use static_cast or dynamic_cast (or, if you are converting to a base class, no cast may be necessary).


To explain why you see this particular behavior, though: when you call a nonvirtual member function (as you do with d->method(), assuming method is a nonvirtual member function of Derived), the function that gets called is determined at compile time, not at runtime.

Here, the compiler knows that d points to a D object (because you've lied to the compiler and said that it is), so it generates code that calls Derived::method(). There is no "offset with respect to a pointer" at all. No computation needs to be done because the function to be called is known when the program is compiled.

Only when you call a virtual member function is a table lookup required (and even then, the lookup is only required when the compiler doesn't know the dynamic type of the object on which the member function is being called).

When you call d->virtual_method(), Base::virtual_method gets called. Why? In this particular implementation of C++, the first few bytes of an object of a class type that has virtual member functions (a polymorphic class type) contain a tag (called a "vptr" or a "virtual table pointer") that identifies the actual type of the object. When you call a virtual member function, then at runtime that tag is inspected and the function that is called is selected based on that tag.

When you reinterpret base as a Derived object, you don't actually change the object itself, so its tag still states that it is a Base object, hence why Base::virtual_method gets called.

Remember, though, that all this just happens to be what happens when you compile this code with a particular version of a particular compiler. The behavior is undefined and this is just one way that the undefined behavior can manifest itself.

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The same behavior exists when just using a C-style cast, without any reinterpret_casts. The output is the same with the gcc compiler as well. I think there is something deeper here than undefined behavior. –  DominiqueT Apr 30 '11 at 3:49
    
A C-style cast just performs some combination of static_cast, const_cast, and reinterpret_cast, depending on the context in which it is used. If Derived and Base are related, it will likely use a static_cast. It doesn't really matter what cast is used here because Base is not a Derived object (well, unless Derived is a base class of Base). Since it isn't a Derived object, you can't use it as a Derived object. –  James McNellis Apr 30 '11 at 3:51
    
"In this particular implementation of C++, the first few bytes of an object of a class type that has virtual member functions (a polymorphic class type) contain a tag (called a "vptr" or a "virtual table pointer") that identifies the actual type of the object. When you call a virtual member function, then at runtime that tag is inspected and the function that is called is selected based on that tag." But isn't the vptr shared across the entire hierarchy among all instances? If it is, then how can it contain a tag that identifies a particular type? –  DominiqueT Apr 30 '11 at 10:44
1  
@DominiqueT: No, each polymorphic class has its own vptr table; it usually contains offset to top, type info pointer and pointers to virtual functions (in case of virtual inheritance without virtual functions, it contains offset to top, offset of virtual base and type info pointer). Each class must have unique vptr table just from principle - any derived class might override virtual functions of its base and vptr table must (logically) contain different function pointers. –  Vitus Apr 30 '11 at 12:45
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The compiler only allocates enough memory to hold the requested object. Base might be 20 bytes, and Derived might be an extra 10 bytes on top of that (so Derived is 30 bytes in size.)

When you allocate 20 bytes for Base, and then (via Derived) access byte position 25, it's past the end of the allocated memory and (at best) you will get a crash.

The compiler cannot allocate 30 bytes for Base as you suggest, because not only would this be wasteful, but Derived could be implemented in a third party library and it may not even be known about when Base is being compiled.

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Then how come Derived-method is printing anything at all? According to this answer the Derived method should have jumped to a location with a garbage asm. –  DominiqueT Apr 30 '11 at 4:02
    
@DominiqueT: When you allocate a class you are only allocating space for the data, there is only one copy of the code. When you call the function it will run from the single copy of code, but as soon as you try to access any variables stored in Derived that's when it will access invalid memory. –  Malvineous Apr 30 '11 at 4:07
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