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A (somewhat) outdated article explores ways to use decltype along with SFINAE to detect if a type supports certain operators, such as == or <.

Here's example code to detect if a class supports the < operator:

template <class T>
struct supports_less_than
{
    static auto less_than_test(const T* t) -> decltype(*t < *t, char(0))
    { }

    static std::array<char, 2> less_than_test(...) { }

    static const bool value = (sizeof(less_than_test((T*)0)) == 1);
};

int main()
{
    std::cout << std::boolalpha << supports_less_than<std::string>::value << endl;
}

This outputs true, since of course std::string supports the < operator. However, if I try to use it with a class that doesn't support the < operator, I get a compiler error:

error: no match for ‘operator<’ in ‘* t < * t’

So SFINAE is not working here. I tried this on GCC 4.4 and GCC 4.6, and both exhibited the same behavior. So, is it possible to use SFINAE in this manner to detect whether a type supports certain expressions?

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We don't need to use c++0x for checking if operator < function exists in the class. We can simply templatize that function for generic overload and use its size for negative logic. See my answer below. –  iammilind Apr 30 '11 at 5:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You need to make your less_than_test function a template, since SFINAE stands for Substitution Failure Is Not An Error and there's no template function that can fail selection in your code.

template <class T>
struct supports_less_than
{
    template <class U>
    static auto less_than_test(const U* u) -> decltype(*u < *u, char(0))
    { }

    static std::array<char, 2> less_than_test(...) { }

    static const bool value = (sizeof(less_than_test((T*)0)) == 1);
};

int main()
{
    std::cout << std::boolalpha << supports_less_than<std::string>::value << endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think it is "Substitution", but otherwise the correct answer. –  Bo Persson Apr 30 '11 at 4:39
    
Right, fixed it. I shouldn't try to spell out acronyms so early in the morning. ;) –  xDD Apr 30 '11 at 4:54
    
But this code still throws error, if a class doesn't have operator <. Questioner has just mentioned only compiled code. And I think you have pasted the same. –  iammilind Apr 30 '11 at 5:19
    
I posted a corrected and full version of the code below (because I was loathe to edit your post so thoroughly). You can use it to correct your example, and in this case I'll delete my answer. –  Matthieu M. Apr 30 '11 at 10:07
    
@iammilind: see my answer, it does work, as tested on ideone at ideone.com/a68WO –  Matthieu M. Apr 30 '11 at 10:08

This is C++0x, we don't need sizeof-based tricks any more... ;-]

#include <type_traits>
#include <utility>

namespace supports
{
    namespace details
    {
        struct return_t { };
    }

    template<typename T>
    details::return_t operator <(T const&, T const&);

    template<typename T>
    struct less_than : std::integral_constant<
        bool,
        !std::is_same<
            decltype(std::declval<T>() < std::declval<T>()),
            details::return_t
        >::value
    > { };
}

(This is based on iammilind's answer, but doesn't require that T's operator< return-type be a different size than long long and doesn't require that T be default-constructable.)

share|improve this answer
    
FYI, there's also std::declval<T>() that you can use instead of your own details::make<T>(). –  pyrtsa Aug 31 '11 at 15:54
    
@pyrtsa : Ah, indeed -- I tend to forget about declval since it's not in VC++ 2010. I'll edit. –  ildjarn Aug 31 '11 at 18:40
    
@ldjarn: For those of us who use VC++ 2010, do you mind putting back the details::make<T>() version too? –  Dilip Sep 14 '11 at 13:23
    
@Dilip : You should be able to view my answer's edit history and see the original code. –  ildjarn Sep 14 '11 at 15:43

Below simple code satisfies your requirement (if you don't want compile error):

namespace supports {
  template<typename T>  // used if T doesn't have "operator <" associated
  const long long operator < (const T&, const T&);

  template <class T>
  struct less_than {
    T t;
    static const bool value = (sizeof(t < t) != sizeof(long long));
  };  
}

Usage:

supports::less_than<std::string>::value ====> true;  // ok
supports::less_than<Other>::value ====> false;  // ok: no error

[Note: If you want compile error for classes not having operator < than it's very easy to generate with very few lines of code.]

share|improve this answer
3  
Technically, if a type overloads operator < and happens to yield a type the same size as a long long [or if sizeof(bool) == sizeof(long long)], this could yield a false negative. In such a case, the overload probably isn't being used as a comparator anyhow, but its worth being aware of. –  Dennis Zickefoose Apr 30 '11 at 6:55
    
This also requires that a type be default constructable. These are not only issues worth being aware of, they're also completely trivial to fix... –  ildjarn Apr 30 '11 at 17:32
    
@ildjarn, why down vote, I checked my code. It works even if type is not default constructible. Can you point out the issue please ? –  iammilind May 1 '11 at 5:36
    
I don't know what compiler you're using, but no compiler should allow static member initializations to use non-static data members -- how would it know which instance's data member to use? The code is clearly nonsensical. –  ildjarn May 1 '11 at 7:28
    
@ildijarn, I am using ubuntu g++ and I have checked this code with -std=c++0x also. Both are working perfectly fine. Also note that, we are not exactly "using" data members; we are just instantiating the function instance (i.e. operator <). Does this code not working for your compiler or giving wrong result ? (except that long long stuff) –  iammilind May 1 '11 at 7:44

@xDD is indeed correct, though his example is slightly erroneous.

This compiles on ideone:

#include <array>
#include <iostream>

struct Support {}; bool operator<(Support,Support) { return false; }
struct DoesNotSupport{};

template <class T>
struct supports_less_than
{
  template <typename U>
  static auto less_than_test(const U* u) -> decltype(*u < *u, char(0))
  { }

  static std::array<char, 2> less_than_test(...) { }

  static const bool value = (sizeof(less_than_test((T*)0)) == 1);
};

int main()
{
  std::cout << std::boolalpha << supports_less_than<Support>::value << std::endl;
  std::cout << std::boolalpha <<
     supports_less_than<DoesNotSupport>::value << std::endl;
}

And results in:

true
false

See it here in action.

The point is that SFINAE only applies to template functions.

share|improve this answer
    
@Matthieu, even my answer also works properly. But OP has decided to accept the first answer. :) –  iammilind Apr 30 '11 at 15:02
1  
@iammilind: yours work by side-effect, since it relies on a specific size for the return type of operator<. I admit that it should work in all practical cases :) –  Matthieu M. Apr 30 '11 at 15:37
    
I fail to see an obvious different to the code in my answer. Do you mean the added include directives? If so, I left those out because they were left out in the question as well. –  xDD Apr 30 '11 at 22:10
    
@xDD: If I remember correctly there are two things: endl is missing the std:: qualifier and it's great when demonstrating a trait predicate to show both alternatives. The second does not prevent compilation, obviously. –  Matthieu M. May 1 '11 at 10:31
    
I only corrected the OP's code, as he asked. It's likely just a snippet of a larger file and that explains the missing includes, and he is probably using the std namespace. –  xDD May 4 '11 at 17:29

In C++11 the shortest most general solution I found was this one:

#include <type_traits>

template<class T, class = decltype(std::declval<T>() < std::declval<T>() )> 
std::true_type  supports_less_than_test(const T&);
std::false_type supports_less_than_test(...);

template<class T> using supports_less_than = decltype(supports_less_than_test(std::declval<T>()));

#include<iostream>
struct random_type{};
int main(){
    std::cout << supports_less_than<double>::value << std::endl; // prints '1'
    std::cout << supports_less_than<int>::value << std::endl; // prints '1'
    std::cout << supports_less_than<random_type>::value << std::endl; // prints '0'
}

Works with c++ 4.8.1 and clang++ 3.3

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