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I have 10 databases for three cities but all of them are located in one DB server with different instances and also 1 main database. each city has following databases:

1-DB1
2-DB2
3-DB3

every record which is inserted in db main has a city field.According to th city field of inserted record the same record must be inserted in three databases of specified city in inserted record in db main. Is it better to I use linked server or using separate connection string in my C# code? as you know my connection string should be changed for each database.

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Ideally I wouldn't make an application responsible for keeping databases in sync - too many things could go wrong - the application might crash, the network might go down...

You might be better off using a database trigger, that way your application only has to update one database and the trigger will do the rest. Here's an MSDN article explaining how to do it: Create Trigger

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should I use linked server in my trigger? – Raymond Morphy Apr 30 '11 at 8:30

If they're on the same database, you need neither a linked server nor a separate connection string. You can just use a 3 part name, like:

select * from db2.dbo.Table1

Which one you choose depends on the chance that your database is ever split up over different servers. If you're sure they'll remain on the same server, a 3 part name is by far easiest.

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What about If I had different instances? Should I use linked server? – Raymond Morphy Apr 30 '11 at 10:02
    
@Raymond Morphy: Yeah if they're on different instances, you'd need a linked server – Andomar Apr 30 '11 at 11:14

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