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Can someone explain to me (in detail) how to multiply two __int64 objs and check if the result will fit in __int64.

Note: Do not use any compiler or processor dependent routines.

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7  
Isn't __int64 itself Microsoft Visual Studio specific? – Peter G. Apr 30 '11 at 8:21
    
@Peter yes, I suppose it is. – There is nothing we can do Apr 30 '11 at 8:30
2  
Technically, signed integer overflow (or underflow) is undefined behavior, so you're going to have to make an assumption about the underlying platform if you want to define the behavior. – GManNickG Apr 30 '11 at 8:33
    
    
I was surprised that no one has provided an assembler solution so far, as here it would just be a matter of testing the overflow bit after the multiplication (even though it would be heavily architecture dependent, of course). Unfortunately I'm rusty on assembler and don't know Visual C++'s assembler syntax, but this answer to a question @rwong linked to does the 64-bit multiplication for x86_64... all that's missing is the test for the overflow flag. – DarkDust Apr 30 '11 at 8:42

not assuming a and b are positive:

__int64 a,b;
//...
__int64  tmp_result = abs(a) * abs(b) ;
if (
    ( a && b ) &&
    (
     ( tmp_result < abs(a) || tmp_result < abs(b) ) ||
     ( tmp_result / abs(a) != abs(b)) ||
     ( a == TYPE_MIN && b != 1) ||
     ( b == TYPE_MIN && a != 1)
    )
   )
   std::cout << "overflow";
__int64 result = a * b;

EDIT: Adding corner cases to code.

EDIT: In my opinion just ( a && a * b / a != b) is enough.

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+1. Better...... – Nawaz Apr 30 '11 at 8:25
    
@Mihran what will happen when you do abs on TYPE_MIN? – There is nothing we can do Apr 30 '11 at 8:26
1  
It doesn't work, consider a = b = 1+2^33, then a*b = 1 + 2^34 + 2^66 = 1 + 1^34, it overflowed, but you don't detect it. – ybungalobill Apr 30 '11 at 8:29
    
@There is nothing we can do @ybungalobill both bugs are fixed. – Mihran Hovsepyan Apr 30 '11 at 8:36
    
also need to catch the a == 0 || b == 0 case before your if statement. – rwong Apr 30 '11 at 8:39

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