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I have a trouble getting the following result from a xml/xslt transformation:

<root>
  <node>   
    <id>1</id>
    <parentid></parentid>
    <name>file 1</name>
  <node>
  <node>   
    <id>2</id>
    <parentid></parentid>
    <name>file 2</name>
  <node>
  <node>   
    <id>3</id>
    <parentid>2</parentid>
    <name>file 3</name>
  <node>
  <node>   
    <id>4</id>
    <parentid></parentid>
    <name>file 4</name>
  <node>
  <node>   
    <id>5</id>
    <parentid>2</parentid>
    <name>file 5</name>
  <node>
</root>

i would like the output html to be something like:

 <ul>
    <li>file 1</li>
    <li>file 2</li>
       <ul>
          <li>file 3</li>
          <li>file 5</li>
       </ul>
    <li>file 4</li>
 </ul>

tnx in advance

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:output method="xml" indent="yes"/>

    <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

    <xsl:template match="/root">
        <ul>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="node[string-length(parentid)=0]" />
        </ul>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="node">
        <li>
            <xsl:value-of select="name"/>
        </li>
        <xsl:variable name="children" select="parent::*/node[parentid=current()/id]" />
        <xsl:if test="$children">
            <ul>
                <xsl:apply-templates select="$children" />
            </ul>
        </xsl:if>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>
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1  
Using an <xsl:key> has a performance advantage, which, of course, doesn't matter at all for small input. To me at least, it also has a clarity advantage, being more declarative, less procedural - but that might be a matter of personal taste. –  Lumi Apr 30 '11 at 10:18
    
True the key has a better performance for larger input, but it requires the understanding of how xsl keys work, which is not required to understand the basic working of this transformation. The Op is obvisouly a XSLT newbie, so I tried to keep it as straightforward as possible. Conceptually the two solutions are pretty much identical, neither is "procedural" (using for-each and call-template would have been procedural). –  Lucero Apr 30 '11 at 10:40
    
A declarative language can't be imperative... –  user357812 May 1 '11 at 2:46
    
@Alejandro, so how would you call the programming style when explicity using constructs with for-each and call-template? –  Lucero May 1 '11 at 15:51
    
@Lucero: Well, it depends. Regarding style there is a classification between push and pull style. I don't like brick templates (a document root rule doing all the transformation), but there is nothing conceptually wrong about using xsl:for-each and xsl:call-template instructions. –  user357812 May 1 '11 at 22:58

The key (no pun intended) is to use an <xsl:key> to set up the parent-child relationship. Once that is defined, the rest is easy.

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
    xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>
    <xsl:output indent="yes"/>

    <xsl:key name="getchildren" match="node" use="parentid"/>

    <xsl:template match="root">
        <ul>
            <xsl:apply-templates
              select="node[parentid[not(normalize-space())]]"/>
        </ul>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="node">
        <li><xsl:value-of select="name"/></li>
        <xsl:variable name="children" select="key( 'getchildren', id )"/>
        <xsl:if test="$children">
            <ul><xsl:apply-templates select="$children"/></ul>
        </xsl:if>
    </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>
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+1 I like this more: xsl:key is made for cross references. –  user357812 May 1 '11 at 2:49

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