Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Are following snippets exactly equal? If no what is the deference?

var x = (function() {
    ... //a
    return function(){
        ... //b
    };
})();

vs.

var x;
{
    ... //a
    x = function(){
        ... //b
    };
}
share|improve this question
    
@JohnS please don't paste code into the title like that. Post your code into the body. –  JohnP Apr 30 '11 at 11:23
    
@JohnP You are right but your title is too generic, it's like "What's the problem with my code?" –  JohnS Apr 30 '11 at 11:24
    
@JohnS but that is what you're asking. Pasting the code into the title does not make it readable. Feel free to come up with a better problem statement for your question –  JohnP Apr 30 '11 at 11:25
    
@JohnP Have you seen: stackoverflow.com/questions/336859/… –  JohnS Apr 30 '11 at 11:31
    
@JohnS That's 3 years old. I've only been active for a couple of months. Also that question title is much more readable than what you had put up. Like I said before, please do update your question if you have a better title :) It just needs to be clear and readable –  JohnP Apr 30 '11 at 11:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There is a major difference: In JavaScript, blocks don't induce a new variable scope. Therefore, you can't define private variables in the // a code block. Compare

var x = (function() {
    var v = 42;
    return function(){
        return v;
    };
})();
// v; would yield ReferenceError: v is not defined, so you need to call x

and

var x;
{
    var v = 42;
    x = function(){
        return v;
    };
}
// v is 42 here, that's not what's intended.
share|improve this answer

One major difference is that at the time of executing ...//a , x doesn't exist. Now in your case, in both cases it is undefined but generally speaking it's possible to access x variable during ...//a while in the first case it's not.

Otherwise in your circumstances it's pretty same. After all in your case the code is basically refactored into a separate function just like in any other language.

share|improve this answer
2  
One more thing: {var z = 1;} will create a variable z in the window namespace, while (function(){var z = 2;}()) will not pollute the global namespace. That's why the function option is preferred –  Dan Manastireanu Apr 30 '11 at 11:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.