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I have used this example to create a shopping cart : http://net.tutsplus.com/tutorials/other/build-a-shopping-cart-in-aspnet/

Its a good example, it stores the shoppingcart in the Session["cart"] state and it should all work fine.

BUT it doesn't. Event if close the browser, or try different browsers, it still maintains state?!?!

Here is the constructor + the add to cart method:

public List<CartItem> Items { get; private set; }

        // Readonly properties can only be set in initialization or in a constructor
        public static readonly ShoppingCart Instance;
        // The static constructor is called as soon as the class is loaded into memory
        static ShoppingCart()
        {
            // If the cart is not in the session, create one and put it there
            // Otherwise, get it from the session
            if (HttpContext.Current.Session["MPBooksCart"] == null)
            {
                Instance = new ShoppingCart();
                Instance.Items = new List<CartItem>();
                HttpContext.Current.Session["MPBooksCart"] = Instance;
            }
            else
            {
                Instance = (ShoppingCart)HttpContext.Current.Session["MPBooksCart"];
            }
        }
        // A protected constructor ensures that an object can't be created from outside
        protected ShoppingCart() { }

        public void AddItem(int book_id)
        {
            // Create a new item to add to the cart
            CartItem newItem = new CartItem(book_id);
            // If this item already exists in our list of items, increase the quantity
            // Otherwise, add the new item to the list
            if (this.Items.Contains(newItem))
            {
                foreach (CartItem i in Items)
                {
                    if (i.Equals(newItem))
                    {
                        i.Quantity++;
                        return;
                    }
                }
            }
            else
            {
                newItem.Quantity = 1;
                Items.Add(newItem);
            }

        }

May you please advise on what the issue might be?

I've read for about 2 hours regarding session state and everywhere it says it should be volatile when closing broser, but in this case it isn't.

Regards, Alex

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1 Answer 1

I am not so sure about using a Singleton pattern to hold an instance of a session. If you think about it the session will need to be unique for each user and each browser that accesses the website. The Singleton pattern creates a single global unique instance. I don't know how much asp.net you have done but, just in case you are fairly new to asp.net a session will be unique to a specific browser instance. That means that each browser accessing the Session["MPBooksCart"] will access their own unique copy of the data. By default an asp.net session will hold its data for 20 minutes (this can be configured in the database). If I was writing a shopping cart I would probrably just work directly with a cart table and cartitems table in a database. A very good example of a storefront website is Rob Connery's MVC Samples App. This is an ASP.Net MVC application so if you aren't familiar with MVC you may find this a little bit hard to follow.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Andrew, thank you for your response. I am fairly new to ASP.net. I think as well the singleton is the fault for this. Here is just the preview of the book site that i am building and you can see it for yourself that this version doesn't work. If you click the buy link under the book price it will do an ajax process to update the session state and put the total items above the white menu. If you close the browser you will see the number is the same or higher. mp-books.ru/html –  Alex Peta Apr 30 '11 at 12:32
    
@Alex, Unfortunately my Russian is no where near as good as your English. I like you design though. Have a look at some of the other samples for shopping carts on the web. One that I like for ASP.Net webforms (classic) is the .Net PetShop 4.0 sample application from Microsoft. –  Andrew May 1 '11 at 9:16

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