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For the following piece of code:

#include<stdlib.h>
#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int x;
    x = rand()%100;
    printf("The Random Number is: %i", x);

return 0;
}

It always seems to print the random number as 83. Why is this?

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1  
Because you didn't initialize the PRNG. You need to set the seed based on something that varies, such as the time. But I recommend avoiding the integrated c PRNG completely. –  CodesInChaos Apr 30 '11 at 13:03
    
@CodeInChaos: What is the 'PRNG'? You are talking to a complete C n00b here. –  jones May 1 '11 at 8:31
    
I just want to repeat that most implementations of rand are very bad and break down even in simple simulations. –  CodesInChaos May 1 '11 at 9:07
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6 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Most random number generators are repeatable. You need to seed the generator before using it which you typically do using the system time.

#include <time.h>
srand(time(NULL));
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3  
Note that initializing the PRNG from the time is not always ok: that gives you a predictable seed. In particular, cryptography requires unpredictable random numbers, but the C library doesn't deliver that anyway. –  Gilles Apr 30 '11 at 13:17
1  
It's also very likely that repeated runs will be less than a second apart... –  R.. Apr 30 '11 at 13:53
1  
Note that merely using time tends to fail miserably on highly threaded systems (like a web server), where two different threads might run at the same time (within the accuracy of time()). –  Sklivvz Apr 30 '11 at 14:08
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Obligatory XKCD reference:

enter image description here

As people have said, you need to seed the pseudo random number generator properly.

The trouble is, it still only generates pseudo random numbers. Most "true" random number generators require access to some physical phenomenon that is random in nature (for example, clock skews or temperature fluctuations).

Otherwise, the XKCD reference is not too far from the truth. Nor is Dilbert.

enter image description here

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Thanks, I like the pop-culture references! –  jones May 1 '11 at 8:30
    
@jones: You're welcome! Random numbers are a slippery slope once you start looking into them. The xkcd and Dilbert comics obviously know this and draw a line in the sand early on. :-) –  Peter K. May 1 '11 at 15:01
    
@downvoter: Why? Downvoting without explanation is --- at best --- rude or, in my opinion, cowardly. Nothing in my post is, as far as I can see dishonest or not answering the question (stackoverflow.com/faq). –  Peter K. May 1 '11 at 23:18
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Because the pseudo-random number generator used by rand is always initialized with the same seed.

In order to initialize it with a different seed, you can use the srand function, and initialize it as, say, srand(time(NULL)).

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Because 83 is a random number, isn't it ?

More seriously, it is useful to have programs providing a repeatable behavior so by default, rand always returns the same sequence of numbers if you don't change the seed.

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2  
+1 for one good reason why you don't always want random random numbers! –  Oli Charlesworth Apr 30 '11 at 13:39
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Seed the random number generator by including <time.h> and calling srand(time(0)); (edited thanks to my commenters)

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1  
Cast is useless and ugly. –  R.. Apr 30 '11 at 13:06
    
@R. Time is of type time_t. I don't believe that's guaranteed to be an unsigned int, though it usually is. –  jonsca Apr 30 '11 at 13:08
2  
@jonsca: time_t is guaranteed to be an arithmetic type, so it'll be converted to the right type anyway. (If time_t was allowed to be something else, the cast wouldn't work, so it's useless either way.) –  Gilles Apr 30 '11 at 13:15
    
@Gilles I had always gotten warnings with it before, but for some reason they're not popping up. I'll have to look into that. Thanks for making an actual statement. –  jonsca Apr 30 '11 at 13:17
3  
@jonsca: Rule of thumb for casts in C: if you get a compiler warning and adding a cast silences the warning, you're fixing the symptom and keeping the problem. In most cases that need casts, the compiler isn't smart enough to warn you. –  Gilles Apr 30 '11 at 13:19
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You can not generate a random number which is truly random until and unless your random number generator has access to a truly random physical phenomenon as quoted earlier by peter. But for a general use you can use C's standard library functions for generating random numbers. Here is a sample code for generating random number between two limits(max and min):

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

#define MIN 1
#define MAX 5
#define QUANTITY 5

int main()
{
     int i;
     //stores the time in seconds
     time_t seconds;
     //getting the system time
     time(&seconds);
     //initializing the random generator with system time
     //as the seed value
     srand((long)seconds);

     for(i = 0; i < QUANTITY; i++)
     {
           printf("%f\t",((float)rand())/RAND_MAX*(MAX-MIN)+MIN);
     }
     printf("\n");

     return 0;
}
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