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I have two Scala classes that look like this (paraphrased):

abstract class GenericParser[T] {
  val lineFilter : String => Boolean

  parseData()

  def parseData() : T {
    for( line <- .... if lineFilter(line) )
      // do things
  }
}

class SalesParser extends GenericParser[SalesRow] {
  val lineFilter = line => !line.startsWith("//")

  // ....
}

The problem is that lineFilter is null in parseData, presumably because parseData is called while the primary GenericParser constructor is still running, so the subclass hasn't fully initialized its members.

I can work around this by making lineFilter a def instead of a val, but is this expected behavior? It doesn't seem right that this problem should only become apparent after getting an NPE at runtime.

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1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It is indeed the expected behavior, and is exactly the same problem as in this question:

Scala 2.8: how to initialize child class

You can basically copy-paste the answer form that question. Solutions include:

  • def or lazy val instead of val
  • early initialization of lineFilter
  • redesign of your classes to avoid the “virtual method call from superclass's constructor which accesses uninitialized subclass values” problem. For instance, why would you want to store the filter function in a val or return in from a def, while it could be implemented as a method?

    abstract class GenericParser[T] {
      def lineFilter(line: String): Boolean
    
      parseData()
    
      def parseData() : T {
        for( line <- .... if lineFilter(line) )
          // do things
      }
    }
    
    class SalesParser extends GenericParser[SalesRow] {
      def lineFilter(line: String) = !line.startsWith("//")
    }
    
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I adapted this from the actual code, where lineFilter is of type Option[Function1[String,Boolean]]. This way, in parseData, I can check the value of lineFilter at the top and, based on whether it's None or Some, execute different inner loops. I could still do this with a def that returns an Option, which is what I'm doing now. –  Bill Apr 30 '11 at 14:35
    
Or, easier still, make it def lineFilter(line: String) = true in GenericParser and override def lineFilter(line: String) = !line.startsWith("//") in SalesParser. This way you don't even need an extra field to store the function, as it's a method. –  Jean-Philippe Pellet Apr 30 '11 at 14:44
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