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I have a div that contains three elements, and I am having problems correctly positioning the last one. The div at the left has to be at the left, the one in the middle needs to be centered, and the third one needs to be to the right.

So, I have something like:

#left-element {
    margin-left: 9px;
    margin-top: 3px;
    float:left;
    width: 13px;
}

#middle-element {
    margin:0 auto;
    text-align: center;
    width: 300px;
}

#right-element {
    float:right;
    width: 100px;
}

My html looks like this:

   <div id="container-div">
        <div id="left-element">
            <img src="images/left_element.png" alt="left"/>
        </div>
        <div id="middle-element">
            I am the text inside the middle element
        </div>
        <div id="right-element">
            I am the text in right element
        </div>
    </div>

Any ideas?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
And the problem is? – Zirak Apr 30 '11 at 13:59
    
What is the width of the container-div? – Arjan Apr 30 '11 at 14:08

You haven't included css for your container div, but whenever it contains floating elements you should hide overflow like so:

#container {
  overflow: hidden;
  width: 100%; /* for good measure */
}

When you position the middle div you are setting margins that span the entire container, so any further elements are getting positioned on the line below. Note, at least for most modern browsers, further. If you reorder your elements, like so:

<div id="container">
    <div id="left-element">
        <img src="images/left_element.png" alt="left"/>
    </div>
    <div id="right-element">
        I am the text in right element
    </div>
    <div id="middle-element">
        I am the text inside the middle element
    </div>
</div>

You should find it works. Better method, as I'm not quite sure whether that is supposed to work, would be to use css positioning. Apply the following css:

#container {
  overflow: hidden;
  width: 100%;
  min-height: 36px; /* Remember absolute positioning is outside the page flow! */
  position: relative;
}
#left-element {
  position: absolute;
  left: 9px;
  top: 3px;
  width: 13px;
}
#middle-element {
  margin: 0 auto;
  text-align: center;
  width: 300px;
}
#right-element {
  position: absolute;
  right: 0px;
  top: 0px;
  width: 100px;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Of course, that is presuming the middle element is of an unknown height or variable font size. Otherwise you could just apply margin-top: -##px; to the right-element ;) – lpd Apr 30 '11 at 14:43
    
overflow:hidden is not a good method of clearing the floats because it cause unexpected issues with CSS3 properties. Clearfix is the better way to go. fordinteractive.com/2009/12/goodbye-overflow-clearing-hack – Brent Friar Apr 30 '11 at 14:46

I think you problem is that you floated the left and right element but not the center one. Try something like this:

CSS:

<style>
    #container { display:block; margin:0; padding:0; width:640px; height:400px; outline:1px solid #000; }
        #left-element { float:left; display:block; margin:10px; padding:0; width:200px; height:380px; background:#ccc; }
        #middle-element { float:left; display:block; margin:10px 0; padding:0; width:200px; height:380px; background:#eaeaea; }
        #right-element { float:left; display:block; margin:10px; padding:0; width:200px; height:380px; background:#ddd; }
</style>

HTML:

<div id="container">
    <div id="left-element">Left Element</div>
    <div id="middle-element">Middle Element</div>
    <div id="right-element">Right Element</div>
</div>
share|improve this answer
1  
You'd need to add a float clearing method to this so you can avoid specifying the height of the container div, but otherwise you identified the problem, the center div id not floated so it is still a block level element. – Brent Friar Apr 30 '11 at 14:48
    
You're right Brent. I usually use some kind of clearfix style, applied as a class to the container. I'm used to writing all my styles in less now so writing longform like this without my mixins and variables, I sometimes overlook that stuff. – Jonathan Miller Apr 30 '11 at 16:40

The problem is specifically that the middle div has a width set but is not floated, meaning it is still a block level element. Even though the div itself does not go the entire width of the container, it is still treated as such. You need to do 2 things - float the middle div, then clear the floats so the container grows with the height of the child divs. The clearfix method is preferred since it does not cause issues with CSS3 properties that naturally extend outside the bounds of the element they are applied to (box-shadow, text-shadow, etc).

http://perishablepress.com/press/2009/12/06/new-clearfix-hack/

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