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The pattern to create singletons seems to be something like:

public class Singleton {
    private static final Singleton instance = new Singleton();
    private Singleton(){
    }

    public static Singleton getInstance()
    {
        return instance;
    }
}

However my problem is how do you Unit with a class like this if the Singleton Constructor does something that is not unit test friendly e.g. calls external service , jndi lookup etc.

I would think i could refactor it like:

public class Singleton {
    private static Singleton instance;
    private Singleton(){
    }

    public synchronized static Singleton getInstance()
    {
        if(instance == null)
             instance = new Singleton();
        return instance;
    }

     //for the unit tests
     public static void setInstance(Singleton s)
     {
          instancce = s;
     }
}

The problem now is that just for unit testability I have forced the getInstance to be synchronized so just for testing aspect it will have a negative impact on the real application. Is there a way around it, it seems any other sort of lazy initialization will not work because of the broken nature of double locking pattern in java.

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You have identified a key downside of the Singleton pattern: It locks you into a specific implementation of the Singleton interface. Yes, you can get around this in various ways, most terribly ugly. Instead, ask yourself if you really need a singleton at all. –  hifier May 1 '11 at 16:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could use the Factory pattern to create the singleton, and switch implementations depending on evironment.

Or, avoid using the singleton pattern, and use Dependency Injection instead.

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You can use an enum as a Singleton

enum Singleton {
    INSTANCE;
}

Say your singleton does something undesirable in unit tests, you can;

// in the unit test before using the Singleton, or any other global flag.
System.setProperty("unit.testing", "true");

Singleton.INSTANCE.doSomething();

enum Singleton {
    INSTANCE;
    {
        if(Boolean.getBoolean("unit.testing")) {
           // is unit testing.
        } else {
           // normal operation.
        }
    }
}

Note: there is no synchronised blocks or explicit lock needed. The INSTANCE will not be loaded until the Class is accessed. Provided you only use Singleton.INSTANCE and not Singleton.class there won't be a problem.

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Double-checked locking is broken in every language, not just Java.

I tend to eschew singletons, but you can use the holder pattern just fine if you need them, as recommended in Brian Goetz's Java Concurrency in Practice:

public class Foo
{
  static class Holder
  {
    static final Foo instance = new Foo();
  }

  public static Foo getInstance()
  {
    return Holder.instance;
  }

  private Foo()
  {
  }

  // ...
}
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You can dependency inject the singleton instance, override the getInstance() from the unit test code, use aspect oriented programming to intercept the method call and return a different object, or use a tool like jmockit which lets you mock pretty much anything, including statics, final classes, constructors, and all the stuff people normally say is "untestable."

One approach I've taken in legacy systems (where I wanted to make something testable with a minimal impact on the system's architecture) was to modify the factory methods (getInstance) to check a system property for an alternate implementation that I would instantiate instead. This was set to an alternate, mock object in the unit test suite.

As for the "double checked locking is broken" statement, that's not really true anymore, if you use the volatile keyword, and Java >= 1.5. It was broken (even with volatile) with 1.4 and earlier, but if you know your code will be run on only recent JVMs, I wouldn't worry about it. But I also wouldn't use a singleton anyway: having a DI/IOC container manage the lifecycle of the object would solve both of your problems (testability and synchronized accessor bottleneck) much more elegantly.

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hmm I like the idea of a System Property which could flag for unit testing. Ideally it would be nice to change to not use the Singleton but that its a bit above me , large old code base and no time to re-factor :(. –  bluphoenix May 1 '11 at 12:11

How about you lazy initialize in the build phase where you execute the unit tests. Then you change the code back to inline initialize before it's compiled for distribution.

Your production code is inline initialized, except during your tests. Perhaps this discrepancy btw production and testing code could introdude bugs, but which?

(Of course if this is a solution, we let a build phase + tool do the work. I see this facilitated with maven and dp4j).

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