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In practising multithreading, I had wished to simply build an application that could calculate all possible combinations of a character set (i.e. brute force cracking/matching) and distributing work among threads, to really get to measure and see first hand how the threading can affect the algorithm's time on different systems.

The algorithm to calculate this, has been a great challenge to me so far. On a recent thread (What would be an efficient way to add multithreading to this simple algorithm?) I seemed to get down what I needed to do (easily pass specific parts of each character range to distribute work) although the algorithm simply did not work, and I did not understand the complexity enough to fix it in my application.

In a simple, iterative manner, how could I compute every combination of a given character set, with a specific length (i.e. 5 in length?)

in example:

unsigned char range[] = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789";
brute_force(range, len); //character set, length of string to compute all combinations of
//...

I would be very thankful to relieve some stress on finding the proper concepts of doing this.

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Do you want combinations or permutations? That is, is abcde the same as edcba? –  Jim Mischel Apr 30 '11 at 16:59
    
By the way, the numbers you're dealing with are pretty large. If order matters (i.e. you're doing permutations), then 36 items taken 5 at a time will be about 45.2 million. Taken 12 at a time it's almost 600,000,000,000,000,000. –  Jim Mischel Apr 30 '11 at 17:02
    
Jerome already provided the implementation in a simple, iterative manner; just set len = 5 stackoverflow.com/questions/1749657/… –  J.F. Sebastian Apr 30 '11 at 18:49
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3 Answers

One approach:

void brute_force(String range, int len) {
        for (int i = 0; i < range.length(); ++i) {
           final String x  = "" + range.charAt(i);
           Thread t = new Thread(){
               public void run() { brute_force(x, range[].replace(x, ""), len); };
            };
            t.start();
        }
}

Where brute_force(String, String, int) will generate the combinations.

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Straightfoward iterative bruteforcing for 5 elements:

for c1 in set {
for c2 in set {
for c3 in set {
for c4 in set {
for c5 in set {
    test(c1,c2,c3,c4,c5);
}}}}}

To divide the work between threads, just bive a sepatare "beggining part" for each thread. So first thread handles all wards startting with 'a', second takes the 'b's and so on. (If you have more than 26 threads, then first one gets 'aa' second 'ab' and so on...


If you want a solution that scales better with the length, then it is better to phrase the problem recursevely (If you want, this could be converted into a version using explicit stacks instead):

unsigned char charset = /**/
unsigned int setsize = sizeof charset;

bool test(combination);   

function bruteforce(output, n){
  /* Goes through all character combinations of length n,
     writing them in output and calling test on them afterwards */
  if(n == 0){
    test(output);
  }else{
    for(int i=0; i<setsize; i++){
      output[n-1] = charset[i];
      bruteforce(output, n-1);
    }
  }
}

unsigned char my_output[final_length];
bruteforce(my_output, final_length);
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There are several ways, but easy one to write is following:

# include <stdio.h>

void rec(char set[], char result[], int position, int starting_index)
{
    if(position == sizeof(result))
    {
        printf("%s\n", result);
        return;
    }
    for(int i = starting_index; i < sizeof(set); ++i)
    {
        result[position] = set[i];
        rec(set, result, position + 1, i + 1);
    }
}

int main()
{
    char set[] = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789";
    const int len = 5;
    char result[len + 1];
    result[len] = 0;
    //rec will print all subsequences with length len
    rec(set, result, 0, 0);
    return 0;
}

EDIT:

Also you can take other string with length of set fill to it sizeof(set) - len 0s (positions of elements from set which are not in current subset) and len 1s(positions of elements from set from current subset). Then change this string using algorithm of next permutation and each time get new subset.

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