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I have a question about union in C Language. The variables declared in a union will share the same memory, ok, I understand. for example,

union student {
   int i;
   int j;
}x;

how could we access the i and j? if we have: x.i = 1; and then we printf("%d",j); what will happen? compiler error? Ok then what about the following case:

union student {
       int i;
       float j;
    }x;

if we assign x.i = 2; what is the value of x.j?

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1  
No, it won't compile unless you meant print("%s", x.j); –  Federico Culloca Apr 30 '11 at 14:42
1  
@ratzip Why not you try this your self? :) –  fardjad Apr 30 '11 at 14:42
1  
@fardjad, I tried, but I can not figure it out how union works! –  user707549 Apr 30 '11 at 14:52
1  
@fardjad: With a language with as many pitfalls as C, learning the limits and semantics of the language by experimentation is not a good approach. –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 30 '11 at 15:02
    
@ratzip, my answer addresses your update as well. To some extent, I will update now with more detail. –  Chris Taylor Apr 30 '11 at 15:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Assuming you use

printf("%d", x.j); 

You will see the same value you assigned to x.i, since both variables occupy the same area of memory. It would not be typical to make both variables of the same type like you have done. More typically you would do this so that you can view the same data but as different data types.

Imagine for example that you wanted to treat a double both as a double and at times directly access the bits (1s and 0s) that represent the double, you would do that with the following union.

union DoubleData
{
    double d;
    char b[8];
} x;

Now you can assign/access the double directly through the d member or manipulate the same value through the 8 bytes that represent the double in memory.

Using your recent update to the question,

union student 
{       
  int i;
  float j;    
}x;

Lets make an assumption about your platform, an int is 4 bytes and a float is 4 bytes. In this case when you access x.j you will manipulate and treat the 4 bytes as a double, when you access x.i you will manipulate and treat the 4 bytes as an integer.

So both variables are overlaid in the same memory area, but what will differ is how you interpret the bit pattern in that memory area. Keep in mind that any 4 byte bit pattern is a valid int, BUT not any 4 byte bit pattern is a valid float.

Lets make another assumption about your platform, and int is 2 bytes and a float is 4 bytes. In this case when you access x.i you will only be manipulating half of the bit pattern that is overlaid by the float, because x.i in this case would only partially overlay x.j since x.j covers more bytes.

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1  
And be careful because whether this is safe depends on the implementation; it is, in fact, UB in the language. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 30 '11 at 14:58
    
You forgot trailing 'f': printf("%d", x.j); –  user2431763 Mar 9 at 11:32
    
user2431763 - Fixed, thanks. –  Chris Taylor Mar 9 at 20:02

Both i and j will be sharing the same memory so whatever you assign to one will be available in other member as well.

x.i  = 1;
// x.j = 1
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This is "undefined behaviour".

You may not write to i and then read from j. You can only "use" one of the elements at a time.

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Sometimes you need to use implementation specific details. Just because it is not portable C does not mean it should be cast into the outer darkness. –  David Heffernan Apr 30 '11 at 14:55
    
@David: I've love to see a "need" to write to an int in a union and read from a different int in the same union. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 30 '11 at 14:57
1  
There's no need. Sometimes it's just convenient. Don't worry, I'm just waging my own personal battle in defence of implementation specific, non-portable C. ;-) –  David Heffernan Apr 30 '11 at 14:58

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