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For example, I have such a code:

<?php
$A = array(
    'echoSmth' => function(){ 
        echo 'Smth';
    }
);

$A['echoSmth']();  // 'Smth'
?>

It works fine! But If $A is not just a variable, but a Class method - than this doesn't work:

<?php

class AA {

    public $A = array(
        'echoSmth' => function(){ // Parse Error here!
            echo 'Smth';
        }
    );

}

// Fixed call:
$t = new AA();
$t->A['echoSmth']();
// no matter what call, because error occurs early - in describing of class

?>

Why doesn't it work? It displays: Parse error: syntax error, unexpected T_FUNCTION

P.S. Sorry, I've made some mistakes in the way I call the method, I was in hurry. But there's no matter how I call. Error ocurrs even if I just declare class, without calling

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2  
try $t->a['echoSmth'](); without the dollar sign –  usoban Apr 30 '11 at 15:04
3  
@usoban: a in uppercase. –  Marcel Korpel Apr 30 '11 at 15:09
    
@marcel right, I was looking at the last line, where a is lowercase. my bad :) –  usoban Apr 30 '11 at 15:11
    
Yes, I had mistakes in call of function. But I forgot to say, that error occurs when describing class. Without calling it occurs too –  Innuendo Apr 30 '11 at 15:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As far as I'm aware, you can't have anything dynamic when defining a class member, you can however set it dynamically as below. So basically, you can't do it for the same reason that you can't do this: public $A = functionname();

Also, your call signature was incorrect, I've fixed it in my example.

<?php
class AA {
    public $A = array();

    public function __construct() {
        $a = function() {
            echo 'Smth';
        };
        $this->A['echoSmth'] = $a;
    }
}

$t = new AA();
$t->A['echoSmth']();

Alternatively, you could define the whole array within __construct(), containing the method (so basically shift your code).

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I got this to work. Not sure why direct declaration is not permitted though.

class AA {
    var $A;
    public function __construct() {
        $this->A = array(
            'echoSmth' => function(){
                echo 'Smth';
            }
        );
    }
}

$t = new AA();
$t->A['echoSmth']();

EDIT: I also saw and corrected $t->$a first, but I needed to move the declaration as well to make it work.

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2  
He has an error, he's using $t->$a instead of $t->a. You got the code right, the OP didn't. There's no php issue here, just a simple mistake when accessing the member. –  Michael J.V. Apr 30 '11 at 15:07
1  
@Michael Incorrect, there's a parse error for defining a closure when defining the value of $A (But yes that was an error). –  Rudi Visser Apr 30 '11 at 15:08
    
That one is also true rudi, I skimmed trough the class and assumed he did make sure he hasn't got parse errors - apparently, you can't trust anyone these days, thanks for pointing that out :) –  Michael J.V. Apr 30 '11 at 15:10
    
@Michael Yes when I first looked it over I was thinking the same thing, but the reasoning is as defined in my answer! :-) –  Rudi Visser Apr 30 '11 at 15:11
    
@Michael J.V. Just that change (or even removing the last row) still gives the error: Parse error: syntax error, unexpected T_FUNCTION. –  Gustav Larsson Apr 30 '11 at 15:14

well , it kinda works ...

<?php

    class Bleh
    {

        public $f = array();

        public function register( $name , $func )
        {

            $this->f[ $name ] =  $func;

        }

    }   


    $foo = new Bleh;
    $foo->register( 'bar' , function(){ echo 'foobar'; } );

    $foo->f['bar']();

?>
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