Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I need your help with a little problem. I have four labels and I want to display on them random value between 0 to 100, and the sum of them must be 100.

This is my code :

private void randomly_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    double alpha = 0, beta = 0, gamma = 0, delta = 0;
    double temp;
    int tempDouble;

    Random rnd = new Random();

    alpha = rnd.Next(0, 100);

    temp = 100 - alpha;
    tempDouble = (int)temp;
    beta = rnd.Next(0, tempDouble);

    temp = 100 - (alpha + beta);
    tempDouble = (int)temp;
    gamma = rnd.Next(0, tempDouble);

    temp = 100 - (alpha + beta + gamma);
    tempDouble = (int)temp;
    delta = rnd.Next(0, tempDouble);

    temp = alpha + beta + delta + gamma;
    temp = 100 - temp;
    temp = temp / 4;

    alpha = alpha + temp;
    beta = beta + temp;
    gamma = gamma + temp;
    delta = delta + temp;

    cInsertion.Text = alpha.ToString();
    cMoyens.Text = beta.ToString();
    cInternational.Text = gamma.ToString();
    cRecherche.Text = delta.ToString();
}   

The problem is that I'm giving to the alpha the chance to have the biggest value, and for delta the lowest value.

Is there any way to give them all the same chance to have a real random value?

share|improve this question
    
A real random number? In short, no. Only a pseudo-random number. The random number generator operates off clock cycles and it is typical to see repeated sequences. The seed used depends on the .Tick property of the current DateTime.Now (if I remember correctly). There are a lot of decent random number generators and APIs for .Net.I would recommend searching for those if you feel like you don't have the time or desire to put into rolling your own. – IAbstract Apr 30 '11 at 16:00
up vote 43 down vote accepted

You could do something like this:

double alpha = 0, beta = 0, gamma = 0, delta = 0, k = 0;
Random rnd = new Random();

alpha = rnd.Next(0, 100);
beta = rnd.Next(0, 100);
gamma = rnd.Next(0, 100);
delta = rnd.Next(0, 100);

k = (alpha + beta + gamma + delta) / 100;

alpha /= k;
beta /= k;
gamma /= k;
delta /= k;

cInsertion.Text = alpha.ToString();
cMoyens.Text = beta.ToString();
cInternational.Text = gamma.ToString();
cRecherche.Text = delta.ToString();

This way you're saying let's take a random value for all 4 variables, and then we'll scale them by a factor k that'll make their sum be 100.

share|improve this answer
5  
+1 very clever. – Puddingfox Apr 30 '11 at 15:47
2  
+1 clear and simple... – geek Apr 30 '11 at 16:33

What if you stick all four values in an array, then shuffle them, then assign them according to their ordinal position? That way each variable (gamma, theta, etc.) has equal probability of getting a high vs low number.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 Were you the only one to actually read the question? ;) – Guffa Apr 30 '11 at 15:27
1  
This gives all four values the same distribution, but it's a very weird distribution. – Ben Voigt Apr 30 '11 at 16:16

It's a very interesting problem. I like @Ivan_Ferić's solution, I think, it's perfect, but I have another idea:

int total = 100;
Random rand = new Random();

int half = rand.next(0,total);   // the line

a = rand.Next(0,half);
b = max - a;
c = rand.Next(0,half);
d = max - c;

(Not tested, maybe +/-1 must be added to some of vars.) Also, you may shuffle values.

The interesting part is coming now. If we change "the line":

min = <some_value>
max = <another_value>;
int half = rand.next(min,max);

...then we can finetune the result:

  • min = 0; max = 100: original;
  • min = 20; max = 80: avoid little numbers;
  • min = 33; max = 100: force two numbers to be less than 32.
share|improve this answer
    
Even when min=0, max=100, this is not the same as Ivan's solution because if half < 5, say, which happens 5% of the time, then two numbers will sum to less than 5. For that to happen in Ivan's solution, two numbers would have to be less than 5, and two would have be greater than 50, which only happens 3/8 of a percent of the time. – Neil G Apr 30 '11 at 17:48

Instead of generating the individual numbers randomly, generate the partial sums, then calculate the parts:

double alpha, beta, gama, delta = 0;

var rnd = new System.Random();
var cuts = new List<double>();

cuts.Add(Math.Floor(rnd.Next(0, 101)));
cuts.Add(Math.Floor(rnd.Next(0, 101)));
cuts.Add(Math.Floor(rnd.Next(0, 101)));

cuts.Sort();

alpha = cuts[0];
beta = cuts[1] - cuts[0];
gamma = cuts[2] - cuts[1];
delta = 100 - cuts[2];
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Why was this even downvoted? In fact thats a good solution that doesnt have to rely on divisions/multiplications. – Philip Daubmeier Jun 26 '12 at 13:45
1  
Thanks @Philip. One would normally expect tricks learnt in grad-level probability and statistics classes to compare favorably with off-the-cuff solutions, but I guess naive voters prefer the naive solutions they would have proposed themselves. – Ben Voigt Jun 26 '12 at 14:09
    
I would very much doubt that alpha and delta have the same distribution as beta and gamma, unlike Ivan's. – gnasher729 Mar 30 '14 at 17:05

If the numbers that you want represent probabilities of mutually exclusive outcomes, you can imagine them as a multinomial distribution. Since you want a random probability vector, you should sample that from the conjugate prior of the multinomial distribution: the Dirichlet distribution.

In code, you just what Ivan suggested, except that alpha, beta, gamma, and delta should all be drawn from Gamma distributions with shape paramaters alpha_shape, beta_shape, gamma_shape, and delta_shape respective. (Let the other parameter of the Gamma distribution be 1.) These shape parameters control the expected relative proportions.

share|improve this answer

A real random number? In short, no. Only a pseudo-random number.

The random number generator operates off clock cycles and it is typical to see repeated sequences. The seed used depends on the .Tick property of the current DateTime.Now (if I remember correctly). There are a lot of decent random number generators and APIs for .Net.I would recommend searching for those if you feel like you don't have the time or desire to put into rolling your own.

Moved up to comments as it seems more appropriate.

share|improve this answer
    
with my code you can say it's a pseudy random number. – Wassim AZIRAR Apr 30 '11 at 15:19
    
...the problem with the standard P-RNG is that it will execute with little to no deviation because of the cyclic nature of the clock. – IAbstract Apr 30 '11 at 15:22
    
-1. What you say about PRNGs is true, but offtopic – finnw Apr 30 '11 at 15:53
    
@finnw: no it's not: "Is there any way to give them all the same chance to have a real random value." – IAbstract Apr 30 '11 at 15:56
    
@finnw: initially, when I wrote my answer his title was: Generate random value – IAbstract Apr 30 '11 at 15:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.