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I would like to create a block tridiagonal matrix starting from three numpy.ndarray. Is there any (direct) way to do that in python?

Thank you in advance!

Cheers

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1  
Do you want the result to be another ndarray, or are you open to using a sparse array for the result? – talonmies May 1 '11 at 8:48

With "regular" numpy arrays, using numpy.diag:

def tridiag(a, b, c, k1=-1, k2=0, k3=1):
    return np.diag(a, k1) + np.diag(b, k2) + np.diag(c, k3)

a = [1, 1]; b = [2, 2, 2]; c = [3, 3]
A = tridiag(a, b, c)
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You can also do this with "regular" numpy arrays through fancy indexing:

import numpy as np
data = np.zeros((10,10))
data[np.arange(5), np.arange(5)+2] = [5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
data[np.arange(3)+4, np.arange(3)] = [1, 2, 3]
print data

(You could replace those calls to np.arange with np.r_ if you wanted to be more concise. E.g. instead of data[np.arange(3)+4, np.arange(3)], use data[np.r_[:3]+4, np.r_[:3]])

This yields:

[[0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]
 [0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0]
 [0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 0 0]
 [0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 0]
 [1 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 0]
 [0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]
 [0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]
 [0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]
 [0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]
 [0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]]

However, if you're going to be using sparse matrices anyway, have a look at scipy.sparse.spdiags. (Note that you'll need to prepend fake data onto your row values if you're placing data into a diagonal position with a positive value (e.g. the 3's in position 4 in the example))

As a quick example:

import numpy as np
import scipy as sp
import scipy.sparse

diag_rows = np.array([[1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1],
                      [2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2],
                      [0, 0, 0, 0, 3, 3, 3]])
positions = [-3, 0, 4]
print sp.sparse.spdiags(diag_rows, positions, 10, 10).todense()

This yields:

[[2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0]
 [0 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0]
 [0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0]
 [1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0]
 [0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0]
 [0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0]
 [0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0]
 [0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0]
 [0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0]
 [0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0]]
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Thank you guys! – Matteo Parsani May 2 '11 at 16:03

@TheCorwoodRep's answer can actually be done in a single line. No need for a seperate function.

np.eye(3,3,k=-1) + np.eye(3,3)*2 + np.eye(3,3,k=1)*3

This produces:

array([[ 2.,  3.,  0.],
       [ 1.,  2.,  3.],
       [ 0.,  1.,  2.]])
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Since tridiagonal matrix is a sparse matrix using a sparse package could be a nice option, see http://pysparse.sourceforge.net/spmatrix.html#matlab-implementation, there are some examples and comparisons with MATLAB even...

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My answer builds of @TheCorwoodRep's answer. I am just posting it because I made a few changes to make it more modular so that it would work for different orders of matrices and also changing the values of k1,k2,k3 i.e which decide where the diagonal appears, will take care of the overflow automatically. While calling the function you can specify what values should appear on the diagonals.

import numpy as np
def tridiag(T,x,y,z,k1=-1, k2=0, k3=1):
    a = [x]*(T-abs(k1)); b = [y]*(T-abs(k2)); c = [z]*(T-abs(k3))
    return np.diag(a, k1) + np.diag(b, k2) + np.diag(c, k3)

D=tridiag(10,-1,2,-1)
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