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EDIT:
What time complexity has algorithm implemented in this assembly ?

    .file   "a.c"
    .section    .rodata
.LC0:
    .string "%d\n"
.LC1:
    .string "%d"
    .text
.globl main
    .type   main, @function
main:
    pushl   %ebp
    movl    %esp, %ebp
    andl    $-16, %esp
    subl    $32, %esp
    cmpl    $1, 8(%ebp)
    jg  .L2
    movl    $.LC0, %eax
    movl    $-1, 4(%esp)
    movl    %eax, (%esp)
    call    printf
    jmp .L8
.L2:
    movl    $.LC1, %edx
    movl    12(%ebp), %eax
    addl    $4, %eax
    movl    (%eax), %eax
    leal    24(%esp), %ecx
    movl    %ecx, 8(%esp)
    movl    %edx, 4(%esp)
    movl    %eax, (%esp)
    call    __isoc99_sscanf
    testl   %eax, %eax
    jne .L4
    movl    $.LC0, %eax
    movl    $-2, 4(%esp)
    movl    %eax, (%esp)
    call    printf
    jmp .L8
.L4:
    movl    24(%esp), %eax
    testl   %eax, %eax
    jns .L5
    movl    $.LC0, %eax
    movl    $-3, 4(%esp)
    movl    %eax, (%esp)
    call    printf
    jmp .L8
.L5:
    movl    $0, 28(%esp)
    jmp .L6
.L7:
    addl    $1, 28(%esp)
.L6:
    movl    24(%esp), %eax
    cmpl    %eax, 28(%esp)
    jl  .L7
    movl    $.LC0, %eax
    movl    28(%esp), %edx
    movl    %edx, 4(%esp)
    movl    %eax, (%esp)
    call    printf
.L8:
    leave
    ret
    .size   main, .-main
    .ident  "GCC: (Ubuntu 4.4.3-4ubuntu5) 4.4.3"
    .section    .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Do you understand what time complexity means? –  nbt Apr 30 '11 at 18:48
    
Speculatively added the [homework] tag. –  Stephen Canon Apr 30 '11 at 18:51
    
No, it's not homework, it's just interesting puzzle to ASM and CS gurus... –  Agnius Vasiliauskas May 1 '11 at 9:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

There is only a small section of your assembly where control flows in a way other than straight-ahead execution or forward jumps (or calls to printf or sscanf with a format string of "%d"). Since those sections of the code are only executed once, they have complexity O(1).

So the only interesting complexity is in the place where a backwards jump is possible:

.L5: movl    $0,    28(%esp)
     jmp     .L6
.L7: addl    $1,    28(%esp)
.L6: movl 24(%esp),    %eax
     cmpl    %eax,  28(%esp)
     jl      .L7

This is just a basic for loop; in C it would look like this:

for (int i=0; i<n; ++i);

An aside: this brings up a danger of using "abstract pseudocode" to talk about the complexity of assembly; this loop does nothing so the abstract pseudocode equivalent, in some sense, is empty and has complexity O(1). The actual code, however, has complexity O(n).

So this loop takes O(n) time, where n is the value of the input to the program as an integer. Since the rest of the program takes O(1) time, the program as a whole runs in O(n).

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent, thanks ! –  Agnius Vasiliauskas May 5 '11 at 7:42

Time-complexity is about algorithm, not implementations, therefore you have to "reverse-engineer" it back.

You have to do it with every language, assembly being just one of those.

The fact that understanding an algorithm expressed with - say - java is easier than doing it with ASM doesn't change the state of affairs.

Edit: parts of this answer is just copied from my comments below.

share|improve this answer
2  
First you'd need to "reverse engineer" the x86 code back to a higher level abstraction, e.g. pseudo code, then do the analysis on that. –  Paul R Apr 30 '11 at 18:57
    
@0x69: you have to understand what the algorithm is with every language, assembly being one of those. The fact that understanding the algorithm with - say - java is easier doesn't change the state of affairs. –  akappa Apr 30 '11 at 19:13
1  
There's no need to "reverse engineer" anything. Assembly is a perfectly fine unambiguous description language for an algorithm, no different from pseudocode. You can perform exactly the same analysis on the raw assembly source to determine the time or space complexity. –  Stephen Canon Apr 30 '11 at 19:16
1  
@akappa: You need to understand it, not abstract it. Time complexity is a property of the abstract algorithm, but it is not actually necessary to operate at that level of abstraction. Some people may find it easier, however. –  Stephen Canon Apr 30 '11 at 19:30
1  
But what is irrelevant is in the eye of the beholder. If your guru level is high enough, you don't need to reverse engineer asm, you will eating it for breakfast. But I won't argue that for most people analyzing an abstract high level algorithm is easier than to analyze the whole thing including all gory details. But you risk always leaving out important details you don't recognize as important and so your analysis may become flawed. Anyway, there exists no general algorithm to prove that the run time of an algorithm is finite,and that can be proven - but unfortunately thereisnotenoughroomleft –  hirschhornsalz Apr 30 '11 at 22:26

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