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Greetings everyone...

If I have the following interface:

interface IMyInterface
{
    int property { get; set; }
}

And the following implementation:

class MyClass : IMyInterface
{
// anything
}

How can I hide the set method of property from the instances of MyClass... In other words, I don't want the set method of property to be public, is that possible?

It would be easy to do with abstract class:

abstract class IMyInterface
{
    int property { get; protected set; }
}

Then I could only set the property within the class that implements the abstract class above...

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you use the following interface the set method will be unavailable when classes are manipulated via the interface:

interface IMyInterface
{ 
   int property { get; }
}

You could then implement the class like this:

class MyClass : IMyInterface
{
  int property { get; protected set; }
}
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Wouldn't that hide the "property" from the interface? –  Girardi Apr 30 '11 at 20:36
    
It will remove the setter from the interface, you can still read the property. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Apr 30 '11 at 20:38
    
The setter in the implemented class will not be visible as it is nit entered in th interface. The setter will be available within the implemented class. –  Roja Buck Apr 30 '11 at 20:47

Don't have the set in the interface to begin with. You can still implement it as private.

You can't "hide" it, it's part of the contract. If you don't want it to be part of the contract, don't define it.

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Sorry, I don't get you... –  Girardi Apr 30 '11 at 20:29
    
@Girardi - What don't you get? If you define it in an interface, it has to be implemented. If you don't want to implement it, don't define it in an interface. –  Oded Apr 30 '11 at 20:32
    
I want the set method to be implemented, but I want it to be visible only inside the class that implements the interface, while the property should be visible even outside that class... –  Girardi Apr 30 '11 at 20:35
    
What is visible inside of the class is a question of implementation and therefore should not be declared in interface. It's up to concrete classes. Interface only specifies public contract. –  Dan Abramov Apr 30 '11 at 20:38

Assuming you need the setter to be part of the interface but for some reason it does not make sense for it to be used on a particular implementer (in this case MyClass) you can always throw an exception in the setter (such as an InvalidOperationException). This will not protect you at compile time, only at run time. It is a bit strange though, as code that operates on the interface has no idea whether calling the setter is allowed.

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If some implementations will only implement some parts of an interface, it may be a good idea to subdivide the interface into the parts which each implementation will either implement completely or not at all, and then define interfaces which inherit all the common combinations of them. Adapting your example:

interface IMyReadableInterface
{
    int property { get; }
}
interface IMyFullInterface : IMyReadableInterface
{
    new int property { get; set; }
}

Classes which want to support read-write access should implement IMyFullInterface; those which want to only support read access should only implement IMyReadableInterface. This segregation will not require any extra work for implementations of either interface which are written in C# and implement property implicitly. Code which implements property in VB, or explicitly implements property in C#, will have to define two implementations of property--a read-only one and a read-write one, but such is life. Note that while one could define an IMyWritableInterface which just had a setter, and have IMyFullInterface inherit both IMyReadableInterface and IMyWritableInterface, IMyFullInterface would still have to define a read-write property of its own, and when using explicit implementation one would then have to define three properties (I really don't understand why C# can't use a read-only and write-only property together as thought they were a read-write property, but it can't).

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There is no protected or private in interface, everything is public. Either you don't define any set or use it as public.

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