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In Delphi you can speed up your code by passing parameters as const, e.g.

function A(const AStr: string): integer;

//or

function B(AStr: string): integer;

Suppose both functions have the same code inside, the speed difference between them is negligible and I doubt it can even be measured with a cycle-counter like:

function RDTSC: comp;
var
  TimeStamp: record case byte of
    1: (Whole: comp);
    2: (Lo, Hi: Longint);
  end;
begin
  asm
    db $0F; db $31;
    mov [TimeStamp.Lo], eax
    mov [TimeStamp.Hi], edx
  end;
  Result := TimeStamp.Whole;
end;

The reason for this is that all the const does in function A is to prevent the reference count of AStr to be incremented.
But the increment only takes one cycle of one core of my multicore CPU, so...

Why should I bother with const?

share|improve this question
3  
@RRUZ: I don't think it is a duplicate. This is const vs. nothing, not const vs. var. –  Andreas Rejbrand Apr 30 '11 at 22:15
1  
@all, thank you for enlightening me on the try finally issue. I do have one more issue about const. But maybe I should bring that up in a separate question. (is const thread safe?) –  Johan May 1 '11 at 12:32

7 Answers 7

up vote 29 down vote accepted

If there is no other reason for the function to contain an implicit try/finally, and the function itself is not doing much work, the use of const can result in a significant speedup (I once got one function that was using >10% of total runtime in a profiling run down to <2% just by adding a const in the right place).

Also, the reference counting takes much much more than one cycle because it has to be performed with the lock prefix for threadsafety reasons, so we are talking more like 50-100 cycles. More if something in the same cache line has been modified by another core in between.

As for not being able to measure it:

program Project;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  Windows,
  SysUtils,
  Math;

function GetThreadTime: Int64;
var
  CreationTime, ExitTime, KernelTime, UserTime: TFileTime;
begin
  GetThreadTimes(GetCurrentThread, CreationTime, ExitTime, KernelTime, UserTime);
  Result := PInt64(@UserTime)^;
end;

function ConstLength(const s: string): Integer;
begin
  Result := Length(s);
end;

function NoConstLength(s: string): Integer;
begin
  Result := Length(s);
end;

var
  s : string;
  i : Integer;
  j : Integer;

  ConstTime, NoConstTime: Int64;

begin
  try
    // make sure we got an heap allocated string;
    s := 'abc';
    s := s + '123';

    //make sure we minimize thread context switches during the timing
    SetThreadPriority(GetCurrentThread, THREAD_PRIORITY_TIME_CRITICAL);

    j := 0;
    ConstTime := GetThreadTime;
    for i := 0 to 100000000 do
      Inc(j, ConstLength(s));
    ConstTime := GetThreadTime - ConstTime;

    j := 0;
    NoConstTime := GetThreadTime;
    for i := 0 to 100000000 do
      Inc(j, NoConstLength(s));
    NoConstTime := GetThreadTime - NoConstTime;

    SetThreadPriority(GetCurrentThread, THREAD_PRIORITY_NORMAL);

    WriteLn('Const: ', ConstTime);
    WriteLn('NoConst: ', NoConstTime);
    WriteLn('Const is ',  (NoConstTime/ConstTime):2:2, ' times faster.');
  except
    on E: Exception do
      Writeln(E.ClassName, ': ', E.Message);
  end;
  if DebugHook <> 0 then
    ReadLn;
end.

Produces this output on my system:

Const: 6084039
NoConst: 36192232
Const is 5.95 times faster.

EDIT: it gets a bit more interesting if we add some thread contention:

program Project;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  Windows,
  SysUtils,
  Classes,
  Math;

function GetThreadTime: Int64;
var
  CreationTime, ExitTime, KernelTime, UserTime: TFileTime;
begin
  GetThreadTimes(GetCurrentThread, CreationTime, ExitTime, KernelTime, UserTime);
  Result := PInt64(@UserTime)^;
end;

function ConstLength(const s: string): Integer;
begin
  Result := Length(s);
end;

function NoConstLength(s: string): Integer;
begin
  Result := Length(s);
end;

function LockedAdd(var Target: Integer; Value: Integer): Integer; register;
asm
        mov     ecx, eax
        mov     eax, edx
   lock xadd    [ecx], eax
        add     eax, edx
end;

var
  x : Integer;
  s : string;

  ConstTime, NoConstTime: Integer;

  StartEvent: THandle;

  ActiveCount: Integer;
begin
  try
    // make sure we got an heap allocated string;
    s := 'abc';
    s := s + '123';

    ConstTime := 0;
    NoConstTime := 0;

    StartEvent := CreateEvent(nil, True, False, '');

    ActiveCount := 0;
    for x := 0 to 2 do
      TThread.CreateAnonymousThread(procedure
      var
        i : Integer;
        j : Integer;
        ThreadConstTime: Int64;
      begin
        //make sure we minimize thread context switches during the timing
        SetThreadPriority(GetCurrentThread, THREAD_PRIORITY_HIGHEST);

        InterlockedIncrement(ActiveCount);
        WaitForSingleObject(StartEvent, INFINITE);
        j := 0;
        ThreadConstTime := GetThreadTime;
        for i := 0 to 100000000 do
          Inc(j, ConstLength(s));
        ThreadConstTime := GetThreadTime - ThreadConstTime;

        SetThreadPriority(GetCurrentThread, THREAD_PRIORITY_NORMAL);

        LockedAdd(ConstTime, ThreadConstTime);
        InterlockedDecrement(ActiveCount);
      end).Start;

    while ActiveCount < 3 do
      Sleep(100);

    SetEvent(StartEvent);

    while ActiveCount > 0 do
      Sleep(100);

    WriteLn('Const: ', ConstTime);

    ResetEvent(StartEvent);

    for x := 0 to 2 do
      TThread.CreateAnonymousThread(procedure
      var
        i : Integer;
        j : Integer;
        ThreadNoConstTime: Int64;
      begin
        //make sure we minimize thread context switches during the timing
        SetThreadPriority(GetCurrentThread, THREAD_PRIORITY_HIGHEST);

        InterlockedIncrement(ActiveCount);
        WaitForSingleObject(StartEvent, INFINITE);
        j := 0;
        ThreadNoConstTime := GetThreadTime;
        for i := 0 to 100000000 do
          Inc(j, NoConstLength(s));
        ThreadNoConstTime := GetThreadTime - ThreadNoConstTime;

        SetThreadPriority(GetCurrentThread, THREAD_PRIORITY_NORMAL);

        LockedAdd(NoConstTime, ThreadNoConstTime);
        InterlockedDecrement(ActiveCount);
      end).Start;

    while ActiveCount < 3 do
      Sleep(100);

    SetEvent(StartEvent);

    while ActiveCount > 0 do
      Sleep(100);

    WriteLn('NoConst: ', NoConstTime);
    WriteLn('Const is ',  (NoConstTime/ConstTime):2:2, ' times faster.');
  except
    on E: Exception do
      Writeln(E.ClassName, ': ', E.Message);
  end;
  if DebugHook <> 0 then
    ReadLn;
end.

On a 6 core machine, this gives me:

Const: 19968128
NoConst: 1313528420
Const is 65.78 times faster.

EDIT2: replacing the call to Length with a call to Pos (I picked the worst case, search for something not contained in the string):

function ConstLength(const s: string): Integer;
begin
  Result := Pos('x', s);
end;

function NoConstLength(s: string): Integer;
begin
  Result := Pos('x', s);
end;

results in:

Const: 51792332
NoConst: 1377644831
Const is 26.60 times faster.

for the threaded case, and:

Const: 15912102
NoConst: 44616286
Const is 2.80 times faster.

for the non-threaded case.

share|improve this answer
2  
thankfully the try finally penalty will largely vanish in x86-64. –  David Heffernan May 1 '11 at 3:31
    
of course this benchmark is very artificial because the function does nothing –  David Heffernan May 1 '11 at 4:05
7  
I strongly disagree that the benchmark is "very artificial". Because the function does something. It returns the length of the string. That's hardly nothing is it? But I've added benchmark results for a more complex case which still shows significant speed difference. On the topic of try/finally overhead. The overhead for try/finally is identical between the threaded and non-threaded cases, so the huge difference in performace you can see there is the result of cache lines ping-ponging between cores and will not go away with x64. –  Thorsten Engler May 1 '11 at 4:28
    
+1 because it shows perfectly what I've already seen about multi-thread scaling problem with the lock asm prefix used in the RTL. –  Arnaud Bouchez May 1 '11 at 18:06
1  
@Thorsten Most real world programs modify strings. It's at that point that issues with contention are much more serious. FastMM doesn't do a great job of allocating under contention. –  David Heffernan May 2 '11 at 15:47

Don't forget that const isn't only there to provide those tiny performance improvements.

Using const explains to anybody reading or maintaining the code that the value shouldn't be updated, and allows the compiler to catch any accidental attempts to do so.

So making your code more readable and maintainable can also make it marginally faster. What good reasons are there for not using const?

share|improve this answer
2  
One good reason for not using const is that you need to create temporary vars if you want to manipulate the string before passing it on or doing something with it. These additional vars make your procedure longer, harder to read and longer to type. And besides everyone knows that parameters are passed by values by default and only declaring them as var makes them returnable. In fact the only reason const exists is because people figured out that var passing was faster and started misusing var passing to gain (often) tiny speedgains at high risks. –  Johan May 1 '11 at 21:19
    
Thats right. Const is part of a good system for strong typing. –  Warren P May 2 '11 at 20:53

Using const prevents an implicit try/finally block which on x86 is rather more expensive than reference counting. That's really a separate issue to the semantic meaning of const. It's a shame that performance and semantics are mixed up in this way.

share|improve this answer
    
So, how would you go about separating the performance and semantics implications? –  Thorsten Engler May 1 '11 at 1:57
    
@thorsten I don't have a solution. I just think it's a shame. –  David Heffernan May 1 '11 at 3:29
5  
Then you might as well think it's a shame that the earth is a ball orbiting around the sun instead of a disc on the back of 4 elephants standing on a turtle floating through space. :) –  Thorsten Engler May 1 '11 at 4:30
    
+1 for short and simple answer –  Johan May 1 '11 at 21:22
    
A very valuable insight David. –  Warren P May 2 '11 at 20:54

The type String is a special case, because it is managed by Delphi (copy on demand), and therefore not ideal to answer your question.

If you test your function with other types that are bigger than a pointer, records or arrays for example, you should see a bigger time difference, because with const only a pointer is passed, without const the record would be copied before passing to the function.

Using the keyword const, you can leave the decision of optimization to the compiler.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 - makes sense –  jefflunt May 4 '11 at 23:23
1  
I asked about string, because that was my whole point, strings always get passed by reference, so what's the fuss (now I know). –  Johan May 6 '11 at 21:33

The documentation says:

Using const allows the compiler to optimize code for structured- and string-type parameters.

So, it is better, thus rational, to use const for string parameters, simply because the manual says so. ;)


Now, this may be well enough an answer for the questioner, but it is even more interesting to look at the general question whether to use const parameters or not.

Again, the documentation says at just one click away from the Delphi Language Guide Index:

Value and constant (const) parameters are passed by value or by reference, depending on the type and size of the parameter:

Note the apparent equality of value and constant parameters in this sentence. This concludes that using const for parameters, being not string- or structured-typed, makes no difference in performance nor code-size. (A short test, derived from Thorsten Engler's test code, indeed shows an average indifference between with and without const for parameters of ordinal and real types.)

So it turns out that whether or not using const only makes a difference to the programmer, not the executable.

As follow-up, and as LukeH already asked: What good reasons are there for not using const?

  1. To follow Delphi's own syntax:

    function FindDragTarget(const Pos: TPoint; AllowDisabled: Boolean): TControl;
    function UpperCase(const S: string): string;
    function UpCase(Ch: Char): Char;
    function EncodeDate(Year, Month, Day: Word): TDateTime;
    
  2. To produce more compact are therefore possibly slightly more readable code. For instance: using constant parameters in property setters really is superfluous, which surprisingly often leads to single line declarations instead of double, if you like to honour a line length limit.

  3. To comfortably provide variables to virtual methods and event handlers. Note that none of the VCL event handler types use const parameters (for other than string- or record-typed members). It is just nice service for the users of your code or your components.

Of course, there also may be fine reasons for using const:

  1. As LukeH already answered, if there is really no need at all to change the value of the parameter.

  2. For (personal) protection, like the documentation says:

    Using const also provides a safeguard against unintentionally passing a parameter by reference to another routine.

Partial origin of this answer: http://www.nldelphi.com.

share|improve this answer

Generally, I would avoid any optimizations (in any language) that don't solve real problems that you can measure. Profile your code, and fix the problems that you can actually see. Optimizing for theoretical issues is just a waste of your time.

If you suspect that something is wrong, and this somehow fixes it/speeds it up, then great, but implementing these kinds of micro optimizations by default are rarely worth the time.

share|improve this answer
7  
Is it a waste of time writing five letters (const)? –  Andreas Rejbrand Apr 30 '11 at 22:16
7  
As my benchmark shows, a speedup of the factor 6 for simple leaf functions isn't exactly "zero value", is it? –  Thorsten Engler May 1 '11 at 1:51
3  
And never forger the 'const' helps auto-documentation. –  Clóvis Valadares Junior May 1 '11 at 13:32
4  
I like const because it is one more way to limit scope. And limiting scope is a Good Thing(tm). –  Nick Hodges May 2 '11 at 4:56
2  
Think about why you shouldn't do premature optimization, it's because you shouldn't add more complexity to your code, for nothing more than a bit of speed gain. The const keyword does the opposite, it can (in the right circumstances) speed things up and makes your code even more readable. You shouldn't ignore optimizations as well. –  martinstoeckli May 4 '11 at 6:50

One of the most important fact that people omitted. Interlock ... instruction is very costly in Multicore CPUs of x86 instruction. Read Intel manual. The cost is when refcounter var is taken placed and it is not in cpu cache, ALL other CPUs must be stopped for instruction to carried out.

Cheers

share|improve this answer
7  
That's not right. Interlocked operations do not "stop all other cpu's". They are slower because they enforce cache coherency for the involved cache line on all cores which have this line in their cache right now. But the naive implementation of "make all cpu's in the system stop, then perform the operation, then release them" hasn't been seen in hardware on the x86 platform for at least a decade. For some more information, read e.g. blogs.sun.com/dave/entry/biased_locking_in_hotspot starting at 'A common myth is that each CAS operation "goes on the bus"' –  Thorsten Engler May 1 '11 at 2:44
    
Doesn't really answer the question at all. –  Warren P May 2 '11 at 20:54

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