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why segmentation fault in this program

int main()
{
        char *a="asdasd";
        int i;

        for(i=0;i<6;i++)
        {
                (*a)++;
                printf("\n%s",a);

        }
}

Output Segmentation fault

int main()
{
        char a[]="asdasd";
        int i;

        for(i=0;i<6;i++)
        {
                (*a)++;
                printf("\n%s",a);

        }
}

No segmentation fault

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marked as duplicate by Gabe, Tim Cooper, mu is too short, Bertrand Marron, Etienne de Martel Apr 30 '11 at 23:43

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Segmentation fault in the first program because you were lucky. No segmentation fault in the 2nd program because you were unlucky. Calling printf() (or any function accepting a variable number of parameters) without a prototype in scope invokes Undefined Behaviour. One of the manifestations of Undefined Behaviour is a segmentation fault (a good manifestation); another is everything working as you expect (a bad manifestation) ... Oh, and you're trying to change a non modifiable array in the first program too: another case of Undefined Behaviour –  pmg Apr 30 '11 at 23:18
    
@pmg Can you provide some links about the manifestations of Undefined Behaviour? –  bacchus Apr 30 '11 at 23:22
    
@bacchus: c2.com/cgi/wiki?UndefinedBehavior –  pmg Apr 30 '11 at 23:32
    
@pmg Thank you. –  bacchus Apr 30 '11 at 23:34
    
Can I say that when i declare char a[] = "asdasd" the pointer to array a is constant pointer or in exact sense decays to constant pointer but when i declare char *a="sadasd" it is a variable pointer to char but the string is a constant. Is there a way to modify this string? –  simar May 2 '11 at 7:41
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2 Answers

In the first one, you're declaring a pointer to char and assigning the value of a pointer to a constant char to in. In the second one, you're declaring an array of char and giving it it an initial value, but it ends up to not be a constant. In the loop, you try to increment the value at the location of the pointer or the first index of the array. Since the pointer one points to a constant char, it fails: you can't change a constant. The array, however, can be modified, and therefore, does not fail.

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In C string literals (of type char[]) decay to char*, not const char* as your answer suggests. I think it is a good idea to add const to the pointer (const char *a = "foo";) but that is irrelevant to the issue –  pmg Apr 30 '11 at 23:21
    
But isn't icktoofay's point that the string literal is 'constant' (i.e. non-modifiable) - it's not about 'const' the keyword. –  Will Dean Apr 30 '11 at 23:23
    
@pmg: I'm sorry, I was trying to say that the array was modifiable, but the one defined as a char * but assigned with a const char * value wasn't. Perhaps I wasn't as clear as I could have been. –  icktoofay Apr 30 '11 at 23:23
1  
In C, "foobar" is of type char[7] (Standard 6.4.5/5), I believe in C++ the same string literal if of type const char[7]. In C some implementations may allow changes to such arrays. –  pmg Apr 30 '11 at 23:30
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The architecture you're using implements char *a="asdasd"; by storing the constant string "asdasd" in pages that are marked read-only because it really is const char* even though you said otherwise. This is a good thing because it makes it easier for your operating system to share these pages across multiple processes (like it can do with code).

If you're using gcc you can use -Wwrite-strings to have the compiler warn you when you do this, or if you're using an older version (pre-4.0), -fwritable-strings (or -traditional) to not use the read-only page mapping.

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Hmm .. in C string literals are char[], not const char[] or const char*. Using gcc -Wwrite-strings makes gcc a compiler implementation for a language similar to C, but not quite C. –  pmg Apr 30 '11 at 23:36
    
@pmg String literals have formal type char [] but semantic type const char []. C++ changed it with their last iteration, C compilers are bound to follow. –  geocar Apr 30 '11 at 23:46
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