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I have a .py file that takes a list, finds the lowest number, puts it into a new array, removes the lowest number from the first array, and repeats until the original array returns contains no more items:

def qSort(lsort):
    listlength = len(lsort)
    sortedlist = list()
    if listlength == 0:
        return lsort
    else:
        while listlength > 0:
            lmin = min(lsort)
            sortedlist.append(lmin)
            lsort.remove(lmin)
            listlength = len(lsort)
        return sortedlist

Now another .py file imports the qSort and runs it on some list, saving it to a variable. Then I try to use the .reverse() command on the list and I end up getting it as a NoneType. I try to use reversed(), but all it does is say "<listreverseiterator object at 0xSomeRandomHex>":

from qSort import qSort #refer to my first Pastebin

qSort = qSort([5,42,66,1,24,5234,62])
print qSort #this prints the sorted list
print type(qSort) #this prints <type 'list'>
print qSort.reverse() #this prints None
print reversed(qSort) #this prints "<listreverseiterator object at 0xSomeRandomHex>"

Can anyone explain why I can't seem to reverse the list, no matter what I do?

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3 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

As jcomeau mentions, the .reverse() function changes the list in place. It does not return the list, bur rather leaves qSort altered.

If you want to 'return' the reversed list, so it can be used like you attempt in your example, you can do a slice with a direction of -1

So replace print qSort.reverse() with print qSort[::-1]


You should know slices, its useful stuff. I didn't really see a place in the tutorial where it was all descriibed at once, ( http://docs.python.org/tutorial/introduction.html#lists doesnt really cover everything) so hopefully here is an illustrative examples.

Syntax is: a[firstIndexInclusive:endIndexExclusive:Step]

>>> a = range(20)
>>> a
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19]
>>> a[7:] #seventh term and forward
[7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19]
>>> a[:11] #everything before the 11th term
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
>>> a[::2] # even indexed terms.  0th, 2nd, etc
[0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18]
>>> a[4:17]
[4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16]
>>> a[4:17:2]
[4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16]
>>> a[::-1]
[19, 18, 17, 16, 15, 14, 13, 12, 11, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0]
>>> a[19:4:-5]
[19, 14, 9]
>>> a[1:4] = [100, 200, 300] #you can assign to slices too
>>> a
[0, 100, 200, 300, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19]
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"Slices"? You're speaking Greek right now. However, your method works and it works with fewer keystrokes, so it's good for me. –  ssiddi38 May 1 '11 at 2:45
    
slices let you take a piece of an array. it works like a[beginIndexIncluded:endIndexExcluded:Step] a[0:4] gives the list with terms 0 thru 3 of a. a[3::2] gives the list with term 3, 5, 7... to the end. a[::-1] includes all elements of a, but starts with the last one and ends with the first (reversal) –  jon_darkstar May 1 '11 at 2:51
    
+1, an accepted answer deserves an upvote, and I agree that's the best solution –  jcomeau_ictx May 1 '11 at 2:51
    
Oh, wow. That's really useful. I just learning Python today, so I'm not very knowledgeable on it yet. –  ssiddi38 May 1 '11 at 2:53
    
That makes a ton of sense now. –  ssiddi38 May 1 '11 at 3:02
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list.reverse() reverses in-place and returns nothing (None). so you don't say:


mylist = mylist.reverse()

you say:


mylist.reverse()

or alternatively:


mylist = list(reversed(mylist))
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To create an iterator that will loop over the list in reverse order, use the reversed function: reversed(mylist) returns a list. –  Samir Talwar May 1 '11 at 2:32
    
@Samir: reversed(mylist) returns, as you first said, an iterator, and not a list. –  jcomeau_ictx May 1 '11 at 2:34
    
Apologies, poor choice of words. You're correct. –  Samir Talwar May 1 '11 at 11:25
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The reverse() list method sorts the list in place and returns None to remind you of that (according to note 7 in the documentation). The built-in reversed() function returns an iterator object, which can be turned into a list object by passing it to the list() constructor function like this: list(reversed(qSort)). You can accomplish the same thing by creating a slice with a step size of negative one so it goes backwards, i.e qSort[::-1].

BTW, list's also have a sort() method (but be careful, it also returns None ;-).

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