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In my code I have private E[] arrCirc; and in my constructor I have arrCirc = (E[]) new Object[capacity]; but when I try to compile it I get an warning:

[unchecked] unchecked cast
found : java.lang.Object
required: E[]

Error and I'm not sure why.

public class Array12<E> implements LimCapList<E>{

  private int size = 0;
  private int capacity = 0;
  private int front;
  private int back;
  private E[] arrCirc;

  public Array12(int capacity){
     if( capacity <= 0)
       throw new IllegalArgumentException();
     arrCirc = (E[]) new Object[capacity];
     front = 0;
     back = 1;
  }
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2 Answers

Can you make your arrCirc of type Object[] (like most generic collections in openJDK do) ?

( and do arrCirc = new Object[capacity]; )

Otherwise for the warning, you can just use SupressWarning.

        @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
        public Array12(int capacity){
             if( capacity <= 0)
               throw new IllegalArgumentException();
             arrCirc = (E[]) new Object[capacity];
             front = 0;
             back = 1;
          } 
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My assignment said I should only have a single argument constructor of type int. Otherwise I could use this. –  user714003 May 1 '11 at 3:47
    
I made my arrCirc into an Object[] type but I still get the warning. –  user714003 May 1 '11 at 4:02
    
@user in that case, you would not need the casting to (E[]). –  Bala R May 1 '11 at 4:04
    
I doubt this casting work. You cannot say that a array of object is Of type E[]. I think this is flawed. –  Edwin Dalorzo May 1 '11 at 4:04
    
@edalorzo There will be no casting if it's Object[] but the array should be private. It's like the array can contain anything Object[] arr = new Object[10]; arr[1] = "kjdklsf"; arr[2] = 1;. Ofcourse it's not type safe ; You'll have to do type checking in your add, remove and get methods. –  Bala R May 1 '11 at 4:06
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Java uses Type Erasure to implement generics, so it can't know at Runtime what you mean with (E[]), that's why you get the warning of a potentially unsafe cast.

Take a look at Sun (erm... Oracle) documentation: http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/generics/erasure.html

You can always use @SuppressWarnings(value = "unchecked") to make the warning go away.

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