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;disas for number++
mov eax, [number]
add eax,1
mov [number],eax
;disas for number--
mov ecx, [number]
sub ecx,1
mov [number],ecx

Why number++ uses EAX while number-- uses ECX ?

What's the convention for dispatching registers ?

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For disassembly, did you do both ++ and -- in a single test (i.e. same file), or did you do two separate tests? –  Joel Lee May 1 '11 at 4:38
    
Yes,in a single test. –  kern May 1 '11 at 8:19

4 Answers 4

Register allocation is up to the compiler. Usually, it'll depend primarily on the surrounding code, not on the operation(s) you carry out.

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Isn't register allocation specified in assembly/binary ? –  kern May 1 '11 at 7:10
    
@kern: when you write assembly language, you can mostly use registers as you see fit. A few instructions have specific source and/or destination registers (depending on the instruction set you're programming for), but beyond that it's up to you. –  Jerry Coffin May 1 '11 at 15:56

There is no convention for these operations. Most registers are general purpose, and can be used for common arithmetic operations.

The compiler is just using a register that happens to be free at that point in the code.

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Your missing the assembly around those extracts, which is probably the most important part, else you can't tell if other registers where in use or not (or if calling conventions played a role).

With the surrounding pieces its a little easier to tell whether the allocation was partly arbitrary(graph coloring) or a more uniform linear scan etc. The compiler flags will also affect this too, because both your above examples can be don't without the use of registers.

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See all of the other answers saying that it is compiler and code dependent, there is no rule.

unsigned int x;

void one ( void )
{
  x++;
}
void two ( void )
{
 x--;
}

with optimizations

one:
    addl    $1, x(%rip)
    ret
two:
    subl    $1, x(%rip)
    ret

same compiler, same code, same day, no optimizations, eax is used for both

one:
    pushq   %rbp
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
    movl    x(%rip), %eax
    addl    $1, %eax
    movl    %eax, x(%rip)
    leave
    ret
two:
    pushq   %rbp
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
    movl    x(%rip), %eax
    subl    $1, %eax
    movl    %eax, x(%rip)
    leave
    ret
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