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I'm writing some code that uses a Tree (a regular tree that can have an unlimited number of nodes, but no crossover, i.e. two parent nodes will not point the the same child node). Anyway, two things:

1) Are there any well-known algorithms for finding a sub-tree within a tree.

2) Are there any Java libraries (or any libraries for that matter) that already implement this algorithm? Even if there are none, can anyone recommend any good general purpose Java tree library?

I want to use these trees for holding data in a tree format, not for their searching capabilities.

To expand a bit: I'm using the tree as part of game to keep a history of what happens when a certain events happen. For example, an A can hit a B which can hit two A's which can hit another two A's etc.

That would look something like:

    A
    |
    B
   /
  A 
 / \  
A   A
   / \
  A   A

Of course there's more than just A and B. What I want to do is (for an achievement system) is be able to tell when, say an A has hit two A's:

  A
 / \
A   A

I want to be able to easily know if the first tree contains that subtree. And I don't want to have to write all the code for doing so if I don't have to :)

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Looks like a straightforward algorithm: Find the root of the search tree in the game tree and check whether the children of the search tree are a subset of the children in the game tree.

From your explanations, I'm not sure whether the search tree

  A
 / \
A   A

should match this tree:

  A
 /|\
A C A

(i.e. if non-matching children are supposed to be ignored.)

Anyway, here's the code I just toyed around with. It's a fully running example and comes with a main method and a simple Node class. Feel free to play with it:

import java.util.Vector;

public class PartialTreeMatch {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
    	Node testTree = createTestTree();
    	Node searchTree = createSearchTree();

    	System.out.println(testTree);
    	System.out.println(searchTree);

    	partialMatch(testTree, searchTree);
    }

    private static boolean partialMatch(Node tree, Node searchTree) {
    	Node subTree = findSubTreeInTree(tree, searchTree);
    	if (subTree != null) {
    		System.out.println("Found: " + subTree);
    		return true;
    	}
    	return false;
    }

    private static Node findSubTreeInTree(Node tree, Node node) {
    	if (tree.value == node.value) {
    		if (matchChildren(tree, node)) {
    			return tree;
    		}
    	}

    	Node result = null;
    	for (Node child : tree.children) {
    		result = findSubTreeInTree(child, node);

    		if (result != null) {
    			if (matchChildren(tree, result)) {
    				return result;
    			}
    		}
    	}

    	return result;
    }

    private static boolean matchChildren(Node tree, Node searchTree) {
    	if (tree.value != searchTree.value) {
    		return false;
    	}

    	if (tree.children.size() < searchTree.children.size()) {
    		return false;
    	}

    	boolean result = true;
    	int treeChildrenIndex = 0;

    	for (int searchChildrenIndex = 0;
    	         searchChildrenIndex < searchTree.children.size();
    	         searchChildrenIndex++) {

    		// Skip non-matching children in the tree.
    		while (treeChildrenIndex < tree.children.size()
    		      && !(result = matchChildren(tree.children.get(treeChildrenIndex),
    		                                  searchTree.children.get(searchChildrenIndex)))) {
    			treeChildrenIndex++;
    		}

    		if (!result) {
    			return result;
    		}
    	}

    	return result;
    }

    private static Node createTestTree() {
    	Node subTree1 = new Node('A');
    	subTree1.children.add(new Node('A'));
    	subTree1.children.add(new Node('A'));

    	Node subTree2 = new Node('A');
    	subTree2.children.add(new Node('A'));
    	subTree2.children.add(new Node('C'));
    	subTree2.children.add(subTree1);

    	Node subTree3 = new Node('B');
    	subTree3.children.add(subTree2);

    	Node root = new Node('A');
    	root.children.add(subTree3);

    	return root;
    }

    private static Node createSearchTree() {
    	Node root = new Node('A');
    	root.children.add(new Node('A'));
    	root.children.add(new Node('A'));

    	return root;
    }
}

class Node {
    char value;
    Vector<Node> children;

    public Node(char val) {
    	value = val;
    	children = new Vector<Node>();
    }

    public String toString() {
    	StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    	sb.append('(');
    	sb.append(value);

    	for (Node child : children) {
    		sb.append(' ');
    		sb.append(child.toString());
    	}

    	sb.append(')');

    	return sb.toString();
    }
}
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2  
Better edit that before the 'Vector' police get you! ;-) –  Outlaw Programmer Feb 25 '09 at 18:04
    
Let them come! :) –  gclj5 Feb 25 '09 at 18:35
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Are you looking for any particular constraints on a subtree? If not, a simple traversal should suffice for identifying subtrees (basically treat each node as the root of a subtree).

I believe you'll find that the API you'll want for a tree varies a great deal by your particular application -- so much that generic implementations are not very useful. Perhaps if you could tell us what kind of application the tree will be used for, we could provide particulars.

Also, if you're just using a tree for data storage, you might want to ask yourself why you need a tree. That answer should also answer the question in my previous paragraph.

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I updated my question to elaborate. –  cdmckay Feb 25 '09 at 4:30
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I wonder if there's an extension of the Knuth algorithm that would be more efficient than a naive traversal...

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Pretty sure that's not possible, since all "tree algorithms" are based on having each node contain some information about its children (such as their maximum and minimum values), and that's not the case here. –  Michael Borgwardt Feb 25 '09 at 10:58
    
I don't see how that follows. A char in a str doesn't contain info about future chars. In this case, the root A matches the root of the target, but its child B doesn't match, and now I should be able to skip checking B against the root-A of the target pattern. –  Ken Feb 25 '09 at 15:41
    
citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.21.3770 uses a string representation of the tree to give sub-linear matching. –  Pete Kirkham Feb 25 '09 at 17:19
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If there is one big, static, tree and you will be searching for many subtrees in the same big tree, you might want to annotate each node with the set of hashes of all of its subtrees to a given depth depending on how much storage you're willing to expend on that functionality. Then build a map from hash values to the set of nodes that are roots of a subtree with that hash value. Then just check each one of those, presumably much cheaper than a traversal, for the hash of the root of the query tree to that same depth.

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