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I am using debug toolbar with django and would like to add it to project if two conditions are true:

  • settings.DEBUG is True
  • module itself exists

It's not hard to do the first one

# adding django debug toolbar
if DEBUG:
    MIDDLEWARE_CLASSES += 'debug_toolbar.middleware.DebugToolbarMiddleware',
    INSTALLED_APPS += 'debug_toolbar',

But how do I check if module exists?

I have found this solution:

try:
    import debug_toolbar
except ImportError:
    pass

But since import happens somewhere else in django, I need if/else logic to check if module exists, so I can check it in settings.py

def module_exists(module_name):
    # ??????

# adding django debug toolbar
if DEBUG and module_exists('debug_toolbar'):
    MIDDLEWARE_CLASSES += 'debug_toolbar.middleware.DebugToolbarMiddleware',
    INSTALLED_APPS += 'debug_toolbar',

Is there a way to do it?

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marked as duplicate by Bakuriu Jul 2 at 21:51

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2 Answers 2

up vote 21 down vote accepted

You can use the same logic inside your function:

def module_exists(module_name):
    try:
        __import__(module_name)
    except ImportError:
        return False
    else:
        return True

There is no performance penalty to this solution becuase modules are imported only once.

share|improve this answer
    
Couldn't you use __import__(module_name, fromlist=[module_name]) instead of import debug_toolbar? –  Dan D. May 1 '11 at 11:03
    
@Dan D.: Wouldn't that be equivalent to from debug_toolbar import debug_toolbar? But even if it worked, what's the advantage? –  Sven Marnach May 1 '11 at 12:34
    
no, oddly it's the same as import debug_toolbar; i've tested this on python 2.5.2; the advantage is that you can then use module_exists("some_other_module"). –  Dan D. May 1 '11 at 12:43
    
@Dan D.: You are right, I'm completely ignoring the parameter to the function! I'll fix it -- I don't need the fromlist argument, so I'll just omit it. –  Sven Marnach May 1 '11 at 12:47
    
note fromlist= argument is required if you want __import__ to return email.utils as without it'll return email and not email.utils; but this doesn't matter here as although it won't return the right module it will still raise ImportError if it doesn't exist. –  Dan D. May 1 '11 at 12:57
def module_exists(module_name):
    if globals().get(module_name, False):
        return True
    return False
share|improve this answer
3  
I think the OP's statement "But since import happens somewhere else in django [...]" means that the import happens in a different module (that's at least my interpretation). In that case, your approach won't work. In any case, an equivalent version of your code is return module_name in globals(). –  Sven Marnach May 1 '11 at 14:35
    
@Sven yes, I made the assumption that he already has it in the global namespace. –  Mike Pennington May 1 '11 at 14:41
    
I regret having upvoted this. I tracked down a longstanding bug in my app as having come down to me using this exact code to check if the module exists. This answer is worse than useless and people should downvote it until @MikePennington deletes it. –  ArtOfWarfare Jul 2 at 15:17

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