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Assuming I have a left outer join as such:

from f in Foo
join b in Bar on f.Foo_Id equals b.Foo_Id into g
from result in g.DefaultIfEmpty()
select new { Foo = f, Bar = result }

How would I express the same task using extension methods? E.g.

Foo.GroupJoin(Bar, f => f.Foo_Id, b => b.Foo_Id, (f,b) => ???)
    .Select(???)
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4 Answers

up vote 88 down vote accepted
var qry = Foo.GroupJoin(
          Bar, 
          foo => foo.Foo_Id,
          bar => bar.Foo_Id,
          (x,y) => new { Foo = x, Bars = y })
    .SelectMany(
          x => x.Bars.DefaultIfEmpty(),
          (x,y) => new { Foo=x.Foo, Bar=y});
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14  
Lord help us... –  Ian Warburton Aug 13 '13 at 14:55
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You can use Reflector to decompile the generated code and see which extension methods are used.

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17  
+1 for teaching a man to fish... –  LaserJesus Feb 25 '09 at 6:52
5  
FYI Resharper will also let you switch back and forth between them real easy –  Nik Jun 26 '09 at 12:45
4  
Even better: use LINQPad to write these queries and it will show you the expression tree (with extension methods), IL, and the SQL generate (if writing against a DB). –  Kevin Babcock Jul 19 '13 at 6:22
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You can create extension method like:

public static IEnumerable<TResult> LeftOuterJoin<TSource, TInner, TKey, TResult>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, IEnumerable<TInner> other, Func<TSource, TKey> func, Func<TInner, TKey> innerkey, Func<TSource, TInner, TResult> res)
    {
        return from f in source
               join b in other on func.Invoke(f) equals innerkey.Invoke(b) into g
               from result in g.DefaultIfEmpty()
               select res.Invoke(f, result);
    }
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Since this seems to be the de facto SO question for left outer joins using the method (extension) syntax, I thought I would add an alternative to the currently selected answer that (in my experience at least) has been more commonly what I'm after

// Option 1: Expecting either 0 or 1 matches from the "Right"
// table (Bars in this case):
var qry = Foos.GoupJoin(
          Bars,
          foo => foo.Foo_Id,
          bar => bar.Foo_Id,
          (f,bs) => new { Foo = f, Bar = bs.SingleOrDefault() });

// Option 2: Expecting either 0 or more matches from the "Right" table
// (courtesy of currently selected answer):
var qry = Foos.GroupJoin(
                  Bars, 
                  foo => foo.Foo_Id,
                  bar => bar.Foo_Id,
                  (f,bs) => new { Foo = f, Bars = bs })
              .SelectMany(
                  fooBars => fooBars.Bars.DefaultIfEmpty(),
                  (x,y) => new { Foo = x.Foo, Bar = y });

To display the difference using a simple data set (assuming we're joining on the values themselves):

List<int> tableA = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3 };
List<int?> tableB = new List<int?> { 3, 4, 5 };

// Result using both Option 1 and 2. Option 1 would be a better choice
// if we didn't expect multiple matches in tableB.
{ A = 1, B = null }
{ A = 2, B = null }
{ A = 3, B = 3    }

List<int> tableA = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3 };
List<int?> tableB = new List<int?> { 3, 3, 4 };

// Result using Option 1 would be that an exception gets thrown on
// SingleOrDefault(), but if we use FirstOrDefault() instead to illustrate:
{ A = 1, B = null }
{ A = 2, B = null }
{ A = 3, B = 3    } // Misleading, we had multiple matches.
                    // Which 3 should get selected (not arbitrarily the first)?.

// Result using Option 2:
{ A = 1, B = null }
{ A = 2, B = null }
{ A = 3, B = 3    }
{ A = 3, B = 3    }    

Option 2 is true to the typical left outer join definition, but as I mentioned earlier is often unnecessarily complex depending on the data set.

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