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I'm not sure why this regex pattern ('\s+') is not ignoring whitespace: the code below searches all of the .txt and .log files in a directory and returns the matched string entered by the user. It takes the string and converts it into hex and ASCII, then concurrently searches all .txt and .log files for the string, hex, and ASCII match. I entered the values of a converted string in 3 different .txt files: string in one, hex in another, and ascii in the third. Initially, all files were matched. However, I added the regex.search(re.sub(r'\s+', '', line)) below in the second major if statement, and went into the .txt file where the string converted to ASCII was entered, and I added a space in the string. I then attempted another search with the same string and only found two matches: string and hex. The search "ignoring whitespace" did not match the altered ASCII string. Am I overlooking or doing something wrong?

Enter string: Rozelle07 (matched) Hex conversion: 526f7a656c6c653037 (matched) ascii conversion: 821111221011081081014855 (matched)

Altered ascii string: 8211112210110810810148 55 (regexp did not match when I tried this).

 print "  Directory to be searched: c:\Python27 "
          directory = os.path.join("c:\\","SQA_log")
          userstring = raw_input("Enter a string name to search: ")
          userStrHEX = userstring.encode('hex')
          userStrASCII = ''.join(str(ord(char)) for char in userstring)
          regex = re.compile(r"(%s|%s|%s)" % ( re.escape( userstring ), re.escape( userStrHEX ), re.escape( userStrASCII )))
          choice = raw_input("Type 1: search with respect to whitespace. Type 2: search ignoring whitespace: ")
          if choice == '1':
               for root,dirname, files in os.walk(directory):
                  for file in files:
                      if file.endswith(".log") or file.endswith(".txt"):
                         f=open(os.path.join(root, file))
                         for i,line in enumerate(f.readlines()):
                             result = regex.search(line)
                             if regex.search(line):
                                print " "
                                print "Line: " + str(i)
                                print "File: " + os.path.join(root,file)
                                print "String Type: " + result.group()
                                print " "


                         f.close()
          re.purge()              
          if choice == '2':
             for root,dirname, files in os.walk(directory):
                 for file in files:
                     if file.endswith(".log") or file.endswith(".txt"):
                        f=open(os.path.join(root, file))
                        for i,line in enumerate(f.readlines()):
                            result = regex.search(re.sub(r'\s+', '',line))
                            if regex.search(line):
                               print " "
                               print "Line: " + str(i)
                               print "File: " + os.path.join(root,file)
                               print "String Type: " + result.group()
                               print " "

                        f.close()   
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@user706808 Short suggestion... Could you edit your question and maybe add some commandline input? I think it would clarify the matter in a way your description might not. –  Gressie May 1 '11 at 13:53
2  
A tip: If you want to run a regex many times, you should probably compile it with re.compile() and then use the compiled expression. –  thomasa88 May 1 '11 at 13:58
    
@thomas Of course that's not the only optimization that could be applied to this code, but a valid one! –  Gressie May 1 '11 at 14:12
    
@ Gressie - can you point out other optimization? @thomasa88 Thanks! - I'm learning .... –  suffa May 1 '11 at 14:28
    
First one is to not repeat yourself, the algorithm of both options is the same except for the part where you do the search, so you could base the assignment of result on the answer to '1' or '2'. Furthermore, you can use '\n' instead of using a print statement for each line. Probably there are more :) –  Gressie May 1 '11 at 15:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For option one you wrote:

result = regex.search(line)
   if regex.search(line):

for option two you wrote:

result = regex.search(re.sub(r'\s+', '',line))
   if regex.search(line):

If your have a result variable, then use it in your if-statement. I'm sorry to say it, but you've got a copy-paste error here in my opinion.

For clarity

if choice == '1':
for root,dirname, files in os.walk(directory):
    for file in files:
    if file.endswith(".log") or file.endswith(".txt"):
        f=open(os.path.join(root, file))
        for i,line in enumerate(f.readlines()):
            result = regex.search(line)
            if result: # FIX 1
                print " "
                print "Line: " + str(i)
                print "File: " + os.path.join(root,file)
                print "String Type: " + result.group()
                print " "


    f.close()
re.purge()              
    if choice == '2':
    for root,dirname, files in os.walk(directory):
        for file in files:
        if file.endswith(".log") or file.endswith(".txt"):
            f=open(os.path.join(root, file))
            for i,line in enumerate(f.readlines()):
                result = regex.search(re.sub(r'\s+', '',line))
                if result: # FIX 2
                    print " "
                    print "Line: " + str(i)
                    print "File: " + os.path.join(root,file)
                    print "String Type: " + result.group()
                    print " "

                    f.close()
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It worked –  suffa May 1 '11 at 14:30

I haven't tested it myself, but I think if regex.search(line): should be if result:

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1  
This site is for providing answers, not guesses. Your answer would be much better and have a better chance of being accepted if you took a few moments to verify your statements. –  Bryan Oakley May 1 '11 at 14:29

When you do this:

result = regex.search(re.sub(r'\s+', '',line))
if regex.search(line):
    ...

... you are stripping out whitespace from line, and the result of that is being passed to regex.search(). The result of that search is stored in result. Then you ignore the result and perform the regex.search() on the unmodified original string. re.sub() does not modify the original line, it returns a string that is the result of the substitution.

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