Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm new to inheritance and all of the previous discussions about inheritance and Python's super() function are a bit over my head. I currently use the following code to update a parent object's value.

#!/usr/bin/env python
# test.py

class Master(object):
    mydata = []
    def __init__(self):
        s1 = Sub1(self)
        s2 = Sub2(self)

class Sub1(object):
    def __init__(self,p):
        self.p = p
        self.p.mydata.append(1)

class Sub2(object):
    def __init__(self,p):
        self.p = p
        self.p.mydata.append(2)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    m = Master()
    print m.mydata

This command line returns as follows:

user@host:~$ ./test.py
[1, 2]

Is there a better way to do this with super() instead of passing the the "self" reference to the child?

share|improve this question
    
Did you intend to make mydata a class-level mutable? After your code runs, Master.mydata is [1, 2]. –  Martijn Pieters May 1 '11 at 14:59
    
There’s no inheritance here, only composition. –  Josh Lee May 1 '11 at 14:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's how you would do it by inheritance. You first have Master which is the parent class, then Sub1 and Sub2 will inherit from Master and become subclasses. All subclasses can access methods and variables in the parent class. This might be a duplicate of: How to call a parent class's method from child class in python?

#!/usr/bin/env python
# test.py

class Master(object):
    mydata = []
    def __init__(self):
        s1 = Sub1()
        s2 = Sub2()

class Sub1(Master):
    def __init__(self):
        super(Sub1, self).mydata.append(1)

class Sub2(Master):
    def __init__(self):
        super(Sub2, self).mydata.append(2)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    m = Master()
    print m.mydata
share|improve this answer
1  
+1, you just need to remove the self being passed to the subclasses. –  Gustav Larsson May 1 '11 at 15:08
    
Thanks for pointing that out to me :) –  rzetterberg May 1 '11 at 15:10
1  
There really isn't any point in using super() to access data attributes like that, even if they're class attributes. You can just use self.mydata.append(1). –  Thomas Wouters May 1 '11 at 15:20
    
Thank you Ancide and Gustav. This is exactly what I was looking for. FYI, I read your possible duplicate, but the code was fragmented and I couldn't get it to work. @Martijn: Yes, in this case my intention is for mydata to be a class-level mutable although I acknowledge it is not desirable in many cases. Thanks. –  tahoar May 1 '11 at 15:22

super only applies to class inheritance structures, where Sub1 and Sub2 are subclasses of Master.

In your example, you use a containment structure, Sub1 and Sub2 are attributes of Master, and you have no use for super calls.

Also, you generally really do not want to use a mutable list as a class attribute; appending to it will alter the one copy of the list (defined in the class) globally, not per instance; initiate the list in the Master.__init__ method instead:

class Master(object):
    mydata = None
    def __init__(self):
        self.mydata = []

The __init__ function is called to set up a new instance, and by assigning a new empty list to self there, you ensure that each instance has it's own copy.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.