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I realise the second one avoids the overhead of a function call (update, is actually a language construct), but it would be interesting to know if one is better than the other. I have been using unset() for most of my coding, but I've recently looked through a few respectable classes found off the net that use $var = null instead.

Is there a preferred one, and what is the reasoning?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 101 down vote accepted

As (it was in 2009) mentioned in unset (now 2013, that man page don't include that anymore)

unset() does just what its name says - unset a variable. It does not force immediate memory freeing. PHP's garbage collector will do it when it see fits - by intention as soon, as those CPU cycles aren't needed anyway, or as late as before the script would run out of memory, whatever occurs first.

If you are doing $whatever = null; then you are rewriting variable's data. You might get memory freed / shrunk faster, but it may steal CPU cycles from the code that truly needs them sooner, resulting in a longer overall execution time.

Note that until php5.3, if you have two objects in circular reference, such as in a parent-child relationship, calling unset() on the parent object will not free the memory used for the parent reference in the child object. (Nor will the memory be freed when the parent object is garbage-collected.) (bug 33595)


The question "difference between unset and = null" details some differences:


unset($a) also removes $a from the symbol table; for example:

$a = str_repeat('hello world ', 100);
unset($a);
var_dump($a);

Outputs:

Notice: Undefined variable: a in xxx
NULL

But when $a = null is used:

$a = str_repeat('hello world ', 100);
$a = null;
var_dump($a);
Outputs:

NULL

It seems that $a = null is a bit faster than its unset() counterpart: updating a symbol table entry appears to be faster than removing it.


  • when you try to use a non-existent (unset) variable, an error will be triggered and the value for the variable expression will be null. (Because, what else should PHP do? Every expression needs to result in some value.)
  • A variable with null assigned to it is still a perfectly normal variable though.
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8  
Note that if $whatever points to an object, $whatever = null overwrites the pointer, not the object itself, so it acts basically the same as unset(). –  Double Gras Mar 11 '13 at 20:23
    
@VonC: the unset quote on php.net you're referring to doesn't exist anymore. –  Jürgen Thelen Nov 29 '13 at 12:08
    
@JürgenThelen true, but the content of that old answer still seems relevant, no? –  VonC Nov 29 '13 at 12:14
    
@VonC: Definitely. I'm just not sure about "CPU cycles aren't needed" and "before .. out of memory" triggers garbage collection. See stackoverflow.com/q/20230626/693207. Maybe you can shed some light? –  Jürgen Thelen Nov 29 '13 at 12:19
    
@JürgenThelen isn't what stackoverflow.com/q/13667137/6309 tries to explain? –  VonC Nov 29 '13 at 12:26

unset is not actually a function, but a language construct. It is no more a function call than a return or an include.

Aside from performance issues, using unset makes your code's intent much clearer.

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That's why I always used them, personally I thought they looked better than $var = null. By the way, I've always used NULL full caps... but now I don't know why ? –  alex Feb 25 '09 at 11:48
1  
@VonC: Yeah, I figured that, but why can you use lowercase true, false and null? –  alex Feb 25 '09 at 22:55
3  
@alex, you can sort of do that with unset. For example "$test = 4; (unset) $test;" - strange but true, and it returns the value of $test before unsetting it. Regardless, the PHP manual does confirm that it is a language construct. –  thomasrutter May 15 '09 at 7:22
2  
@alex: PSR-2 requires lowercase for all keywords. –  Tgr Nov 23 '12 at 9:57
1  
@alex - PHP keywords are case-insensitive; you could also spell unset as UnSeT, for instance. The community has settled on all-lowercase as a matter of style, but other casings still work. –  Mark Reed May 1 '13 at 16:41
<?php
$start = microtime(true);
for ($i = 0; $i < 10000000; $i++) {
    $a = 'a';
    $a = NULL;
}
$elapsed = microtime(true) - $start;

echo "took $elapsed seconds\r\n";



$start = microtime(true);
for ($i = 0; $i < 10000000; $i++) {
    $a = 'a';
    unset($a);
}
$elapsed = microtime(true) - $start;

echo "took $elapsed seconds\r\n";
?>

Per that it seems like "= null" is faster.

PHP 5.4 results:

  • took 0.88389301300049 seconds
  • took 2.1757180690765 seconds

PHP 5.3 results:

  • took 1.7235369682312 seconds
  • took 2.9490959644318 seconds

PHP 5.2 results:

  • took 3.0069220066071 seconds
  • took 4.7002630233765 seconds

PHP 5.1 results:

  • took 2.6272349357605 seconds
  • took 5.0403649806976 seconds

Things start to look different with PHP 5.0 and 4.4.

5.0:

  • took 10.038941144943 seconds
  • took 7.0874409675598 seconds

4.4:

  • took 7.5352551937103 seconds
  • took 6.6245851516724 seconds

Keep in mind microtime(true) doesn't work in PHP 4.4 so I had to use the microtime_float example given in php.net/microtime / Example #1.

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6  
I think your test is flawed. The first loop is simple reassignment and the second loop destroys and recreates the same symbol. If the test is redone with an array unset is faster. I have a test which later checks for existence in the unset case. In that test setting it to null is marginally faster. Test: pastebin.com/fUe57C51 –  Knyri Jul 19 '13 at 14:12
3  
@ansur, always call gc_collect_cycles before starting the timer to get more accurate results. –  Pacerier Aug 7 '13 at 21:16

By doing an unset() on a variable, you've essentially marked the variable for 'garbage collection' (PHP doesn't really have one, but for example's sake) so the memory isn't immediately available. The variable no longer houses the data, but the stack remains at the larger size. Doing the null method drops the data and shrinks the stack memory almost immediately.

This has been from personal experience and others as well. See the comments of the unset() function here.

I personally use unset() between iterations in a loop so that I don't have to have the delay of the stack being yo-yo'd in size. The data is gone, but the footprint remains. On the next iteration, the memory is already being taken by php and thus, quicker to initialize the next variable.

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10  
Setting something to NULL can be of benefit if the memory required to hold the value NULL is less than that required to hold whatever value it was previously holding. For example, a long string. If the string wasn't a constant and its reference count drops to zero, then that memory should be freed. Unset is cleaner - it no longer maintains a reference. You do have to wait for garbage collection, but it's safe to treat it as occupying no memory, because a low memory condition will trigger garbage collection. –  thomasrutter May 15 '09 at 7:29

It makes a difference with array elements.

Consider this example

$a = array('test' => 1);
$a['test'] = NULL;
echo "Key test ", array_key_exists('test', $a)? "exists": "does not exist";

Here, the key 'test' still exists. However, in this example

$a = array('test' => 1);
unset($a['test']);
echo "Key test ", array_key_exists('test', $a)? "exists": "does not exist";

the key no longer exists.

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It works in different way for varaiables copied by reference:

$a = 5;
$b = &$a;
unset($b); //just say $b should not pointer to any var
print $a; // 5


$a = 5;
$b = &$a;
$b = null; //rewrite value of $b (and $a)
print $a; // nothing, because $a = null
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3  
I have been coding php a few years now and never seen "&" about referencing the original var. Thanks + 1 :) –  Chris Sep 24 '12 at 23:56
    
$a=78; $b=$a; unset($a); var_dump($b);//78; var_dump($a);//Undefined variable: a –  zloctb Sep 27 '13 at 15:58

Regarding objects, especially in lazy-load scenario, one should consider garbage collector is running in idle CPU cycles, so presuming you're going into trouble when a lot of objects are loading small time penalty will solve the memory freeing.

Use time_nanosleep to enable GC to collect memory. Setting variable to null is desirable.

Tested on production server, originally the job consumed 50MB and then was halted. After nanosleep was used 14MB was constant memory consumption.

One should say this depends on GC behaviour which may change from PHP version to version. But it works on PHP 5.3 fine.

eg. this sample (code taken form VirtueMart2 google feed)

for($n=0; $n<count($ids); $n++)
{
    //unset($product); //usefull for arrays
    $product = null
    if( $n % 50 == 0 )
    {
        // let GC do the memory job
        //echo "<mem>" . memory_get_usage() . "</mem>";//$ids[$n];
        time_nanosleep(0, 10000000);
    }

    $product = $productModel->getProductSingle((int)$ids[$n],true, true, true);
    ...
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I still doubt about this, but I've tried it at my script and I'm using xdebug to know how it will affect my app memory usage. The script is set on my function like this :

function gen_table_data($serv, $coorp, $type, $showSql = FALSE, $table = 'ireg_idnts') {
    $sql = "SELECT COUNT(`operator`) `operator` FROM $table WHERE $serv = '$coorp'";
    if($showSql === FALSE) {
        $sql = mysql_query($sql) or die(mysql_error());
        $data = mysql_fetch_array($sql);
        return $data[0];
    } else echo $sql;
}

And I add unset just before the return code and it give me : 160200 then I try to change it with $sql = NULL and it give me : 160224 :)

But there is something unique on this comparative when I am not using unset() or NULL, xdebug give me 160144 as memory usage

So, I think giving line to use unset() or NULL will add process to your application and it will be better to stay origin with your code and decrease the variable that you are using as effective as you can .

Correct me if I'm wrong, thanks

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I think while you're returning $data[0] item, the whole array is referenced / but it's just the hypothesis. Try to copy $data[0] to local variable, set the array to null and return the local variable. Good background is here tuxradar.com/practicalphp/18/1/11 and ofc. php.net/manual/en/features.gc.php –  OSP Apr 2 '13 at 5:25

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